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  • Save Fort Pitt!

    Article here: Save Fort Pitt

    "The original remains of Fort Pitt are imminently endangered and could disappear from view at any moment. It's not too late to save them.

    Through an unfortunate series of misconceptions combined with misguided goals for the renovation of Point State Park, some of the leaders of our city, region and state have decided to erase one of the most important above-ground parts of the 'Forks of the Ohio National Historic Landmark' in the park."

    "What Pittsburgh will be given in exchange is simply more flat lawn and a redundant performance space, dubiously abutting a noisy highway bridge ramp. It means loud music on the business, hotel and residential side of Point Park and an uninspired slab surface outline of the great fort bastion that was. Indeed, it will be the nation's loss as well."

    http://www.savefortpitt.org/
    "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

  • #2
    If you are interested in saving this important part of America's military history there is an online petition you can sign here.
    "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

    Comment


    • #3
      A New Battle at Fort Pitt

      "You don't put a concert in the middle of Arlington" National Cemetery, said Nathan Kobuck, a society member. "Why put one in the middle of Fort Pitt?"
      "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

      Comment


      • #4
        Fort Pitt Bricks May Get Buried

        By Allison M. Heinrichs
        TRIBUNE-REVIEW
        Thursday, November 2, 2006

        Work could begin within weeks to bury the only visible remnant of Fort Pitt, a state official said, even though preservationists are pressing to preserve "a national treasure."

        The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission met Wednesday with historians and archaeologists from the Fort Pitt Preservation Society and three organizations readying to spend $35 million to revamp Point State Park -- the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, the Riverlife Task Force and the Allegheny Conference on Community Development.

        The conflict involves the "trench" that bisects the park and exposes a few original bricks from Fort Pitt, which was built in the mid-1700s to protect about 600 men, women and children during the French and Indian War.

        The trench would be filled in with dirt, creating a flat lawn suitable for concerts and festivals. The location of the fort would be outlined in granite, with plaques and sculptures to explain its historical significance.

        "It's no different than reburying the Sphinx," said Michael V. Nixon, a historic preservation lawyer with the preservation society. The society is prepared to file a lawsuit if the state follows through with its plans to bury the bricks, he said.

        Filling the trench would protect the bricks from the park's visitors, and weathering, said Lisa Shroeder, director of the Riverlife Task Force, a nonprofit organization developing a plan to revitalize Pittsburgh's three rivers and shorelines.

        Andy Masich, president of the Senator John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center, suggested preserving the 50-foot section of the trench containing the original bricks and burying the section with modern bricks -- a compromise members of the preservation society appeared to favor.

        Gene Comoss, DCNR's chief engineer, said he would present the idea to department officials, but wouldn't commit to it. He said officials held at least 40 public meetings before developing a master plan for the park.

        David Boyce, a Leesburg, Va., preservationist in town for the National Trust for Historic Preservation's annual meeting, visited Point State Park during a break yesterday to see the trench. He marveled at the colonial bricks, which he said were laid with a period technique called English brick bonding.

        "I think it would be a regrettable loss of an historic resource if this were filled in," he said. "I really think it would be a huge loss for not only the community of Pittsburgh, but a loss nationally."

        Allison M. Heinrichs can be reached at [email protected] or (412) 380-5607.
        "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

        Comment


        • #5
          Group unhappy with plan to dump on Fort Pitt

          Preservationists say concrete, asphalt debris to be used to fill in moat will damage 250-year-old bricks

          Thursday, December 07, 2006
          By Don Hopey, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

          Plans to bury Fort Pitt's historic Music Bastion wall as part of Point State Park's $35 million renovation project have sunk to a rocky bottom, according to opponents of the controversial interment.

          They say the state's park construction contract allows filling of the 8-foot-deep moat along the wall with concrete, asphalt debris and rock -- a chunky mixture of rubble likely to damage the almost 250-year-old handmade bricks in the reconstructed wall outlining the original fort.

          The state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources contract requires only that the contractor compact the fill in eight-inch layers and that a "geotextile fabric" separate the debris from the wall. That thin drape will provide no protection for the fragile brick and could trap water against the wall that would cause damage, according to Michael Nixon, a historic preservation consultant and attorney for the Fort Pitt Preservation Society.

          "They're using [the moat] as a garbage pit," Mr. Nixon said. "It's incredible what they're doing and very telling about how they don't care about this site."

          The state's renovation plan, sponsored by the Riverlife Task Force and the Allegheny Conference on Community Development, calls for filling in the moat to create a level lawn and more usable concert venue on the "city side" of the 18-acre, 35-year-old park.

          Mr. Nixon said that "preservation entombment" -- the reburying of previously excavated historic sites to preserve them for future recovery -- is rarely done, but when it is, it requires use of specific fill protocols that use soft materials, like clays or colored sands, to prevent damage to the resource.

          "But none of that is being done here because it's inconvenient to the so-called master plan for the park," Mr. Nixon said. "They've sold the soul of Pittsburgh, cashed it out to make a retail place out of the park."

          Similar concerns about the preservation of the Music Bastion were raised over the last few months by the state Historical and Museum Commission, which requested that sand and loam be used to fill the moat around the historic bastion where the fort's buglers played.

          "This is an issue that needs to be resolved between the two state agencies," said Laura Fisher, a member of the commission.

          "No one has the intention to damage the site, but it's appropriate to raise this issue and appropriate to insist on an answer."

          Gene Comoss, DCNR's chief engineer, said the state is aware of those concerns but can't afford to truck in those materials, which would add $300,000 or more to the cost of the park renovation.

          Mr. Comoss said the state brought a Pittsburgh-area geological firm to the park yesterday to assess whether the fill material will damage the historic site.

          "They've already talked to me and in their opinion our fill won't damage the artifacts," he said. A formal report on the fill material will be made to DCNR early next week.

          Mr. Comoss said the department has proposed a "middle ground" approach that would put a foot-thick layer of sand at the bottom of the moat and also against the bastion wall, then fill the rest of the moat with the crushed and compacted materials allowed in the contract.

          "That would cost a couple of thousand dollars," he said. "But to spend $300,000, well that's a lot of money and we have to look at alternatives."

          Richard Lang, an anthropologist who was crew chief on the excavation that uncovered the bastion in 1953, said the state should renegotiate its contract and do what's necessary to protect the restoration and original materials of the fort.

          "They've been saying all along that they planned to protect the fort for future excavation, but there have been no guidelines set up," Mr. Lang said.

          "Now the DCNR is scrambling to produce some protocols that would reduce the impact of all this heavy grade stuff it wants to compact in the moat, but it's not following the recommendations of its archeological consultant."

          Mr. Nixon said the DCNR's treatment of the nationally recognized historic fort and colonial-era battleground site is a violation of the state agencies' trustee duties under the Pennsylvania Constitution and the state history code.

          "It's a battleground where men fought and died," he said, "and to treat it like a dump for demolition debris, old concrete trash cans and pieces of sidewalk and roadway is disrespectful."
          "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by HiredGoon View Post
            Group unhappy with plan to dump on Fort Pitt

            Preservationists say concrete, asphalt debris to be used to fill in moat will damage 250-year-old bricks

            Thursday, December 07, 2006
            By Don Hopey, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

            Plans to bury Fort Pitt's historic Music Bastion wall as part of Point State Park's $35 million renovation project have sunk to a rocky bottom, according to opponents of the controversial interment.

            They say the state's park construction contract allows filling of the 8-foot-deep moat along the wall with concrete, asphalt debris and rock -- a chunky mixture of rubble likely to damage the almost 250-year-old handmade bricks in the reconstructed wall outlining the original fort.

            The state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources contract requires only that the contractor compact the fill in eight-inch layers and that a "geotextile fabric" separate the debris from the wall. That thin drape will provide no protection for the fragile brick and could trap water against the wall that would cause damage, according to Michael Nixon, a historic preservation consultant and attorney for the Fort Pitt Preservation Society.

            "They're using [the moat] as a garbage pit," Mr. Nixon said. "It's incredible what they're doing and very telling about how they don't care about this site."

            The state's renovation plan, sponsored by the Riverlife Task Force and the Allegheny Conference on Community Development, calls for filling in the moat to create a level lawn and more usable concert venue on the "city side" of the 18-acre, 35-year-old park.

            Mr. Nixon said that "preservation entombment" -- the reburying of previously excavated historic sites to preserve them for future recovery -- is rarely done, but when it is, it requires use of specific fill protocols that use soft materials, like clays or colored sands, to prevent damage to the resource.

            "But none of that is being done here because it's inconvenient to the so-called master plan for the park," Mr. Nixon said. "They've sold the soul of Pittsburgh, cashed it out to make a retail place out of the park."

            Similar concerns about the preservation of the Music Bastion were raised over the last few months by the state Historical and Museum Commission, which requested that sand and loam be used to fill the moat around the historic bastion where the fort's buglers played.

            "This is an issue that needs to be resolved between the two state agencies," said Laura Fisher, a member of the commission.

            "No one has the intention to damage the site, but it's appropriate to raise this issue and appropriate to insist on an answer."

            Gene Comoss, DCNR's chief engineer, said the state is aware of those concerns but can't afford to truck in those materials, which would add $300,000 or more to the cost of the park renovation.

            Mr. Comoss said the state brought a Pittsburgh-area geological firm to the park yesterday to assess whether the fill material will damage the historic site.

            "They've already talked to me and in their opinion our fill won't damage the artifacts," he said. A formal report on the fill material will be made to DCNR early next week.

            Mr. Comoss said the department has proposed a "middle ground" approach that would put a foot-thick layer of sand at the bottom of the moat and also against the bastion wall, then fill the rest of the moat with the crushed and compacted materials allowed in the contract.

            "That would cost a couple of thousand dollars," he said. "But to spend $300,000, well that's a lot of money and we have to look at alternatives."

            Richard Lang, an anthropologist who was crew chief on the excavation that uncovered the bastion in 1953, said the state should renegotiate its contract and do what's necessary to protect the restoration and original materials of the fort.

            "They've been saying all along that they planned to protect the fort for future excavation, but there have been no guidelines set up," Mr. Lang said.

            "Now the DCNR is scrambling to produce some protocols that would reduce the impact of all this heavy grade stuff it wants to compact in the moat, but it's not following the recommendations of its archeological consultant."

            Mr. Nixon said the DCNR's treatment of the nationally recognized historic fort and colonial-era battleground site is a violation of the state agencies' trustee duties under the Pennsylvania Constitution and the state history code.

            "It's a battleground where men fought and died," he said, "and to treat it like a dump for demolition debris, old concrete trash cans and pieces of sidewalk and roadway is disrespectful."

            I already read this on an archaeology site and I think the whole idea is an abortion and a horrible idea. To think they would cover up such a historically important site in order to build a concert venue for the sake of some money grubbing businessmen sickens me to the core.

            I've got a better idea. Why don't they reconstruct BOTH Fort Pitt and Fort Duquesne on their original sites and dedicate the entire area towards the historical pertainence and perservation of the whole site.
            "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

            Comment


            • #7
              11th-hour pitch made to save Fort Pitt wall

              Preservation group, critical of renovation effort, offers plan as work crews continue at Point State Park

              Friday, January 05, 2007

              By Don Hopey, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


              The Fort Pitt Preservation Society has floated an "alternative plan" aimed at preserving a big portion of the historic Music Bastion wall that would be buried by the ongoing $35 million state park renovation project.

              The plan, unveiled at a morning news conference yesterday at the Hilton Pittsburgh hotel across the street from the 18-acre park, would preserve more than two-thirds of the moat and wall in its current configuration except for a 100-to-150-foot section at the north end that would be filled in.

              It also proposes a pedestrian drawbridge and walkway over the moat, at the original location of the fort's main gate, that would help facilitate pedestrian movement, a stated goal of the existing renovation plan for the 35-year-old park.

              The 11th-hour proposal was made as work crews continued to rip out old landscaping, concrete and asphalt in the 18-acre park. Although some of that concrete and asphalt has been dumped into the north end of the moat and crushed, no new debris has been dumped into the moat trench for the past two days.

              "The state should immediately stop all demolition, land clearing and excavation at this Historic Landmark," said Michael Nixon, an historic preservation consultant and attorney for the Preservation Society, "and prepare a comprehensive archeological and cultural resource management plan ... and adjust their work plans accordingly."

              The restored Music Bastion is the only existing remnant of the original Fort Pitt, the largest British fort in North America, and contains original, 250-year-old hand-made bricks in a wall that sits atop the fort's original 71/2-foot-thick stone foundation.

              The current renovation plan would fill in the entire moat to create a flat "great lawn" on the city-side of the park for concerts. A narrow, inlaid stone outline of the Fort Pitt walls would be imbedded in the lawn.

              "The plan to bury the bastion is an abysmal idea, an historical sacrilege," said Richard Lang, an archeologist who was crew chief on the excavation that uncovered the bastion in 1953. "Pittsburgh is throwing away its roots if it buries this. A surface outline doesn't give any sense of Fort Pitt like this wall does."

              Mr. Lang was highly critical of the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources' final cultural resources report on the park's archeological values, and of, what he called, the state's hastily conceived plan to protect the historic wall from damage as the adjacent moat is filled in with construction debris.

              Mr. Nixon said the burial of the Music Bastion wall was a violation of the state constitution and historic preservation laws, but stopped just short of saying that the society would go to court to stop the filling of the moat -- the trench around the outline of Fort Pitt -- and the bastion's burial.

              The DCNR has one last chance to recognize the historical significance of the National Historic Landmark and change its park renovation plan, Mr. Nixon said, "before they're ordered to do so by a higher authority."

              He said the DCNR, which owns the state park property and is overseeing the renovation work, has recently refused to meet with the preservation society about its concerns.

              Christina Novak, a spokeswoman for the DCNR, said the department won't respond specifically to the alternative proposal until it receives a copy from the preservation society and has a chance to review it. Mr. Nixon said a copy of the group's proposal will be sent to the department today.

              "We would be happy to take a look at it, with the understanding that a contract with deadlines and a budget for the first phase of work at Point State Park is already in motion," Ms. Novak said.

              Wilford Rouleau, engineering professor emeritus at Carnegie Mellon University and a preservation society board member, said the group's alternative proposal is a practical solution to the impasse, and, if addressed immediately, won't entail additional costs.

              "While we can't prevent the damage done already to the historic resources on site, it's not too late for Governor Rendell and DCNR Secretary Michael DiBerardinis to do the right thing," Mr. Rouleau said. "We look forward to an invitation to meet with them again to resolve this major controversy."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Magnusmagic View Post
                11th-hour pitch made to save Fort Pitt wall

                Preservation group, critical of renovation effort, offers plan as work crews continue at Point State Park

                Friday, January 05, 2007

                By Don Hopey, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


                The Fort Pitt Preservation Society has floated an "alternative plan" aimed at preserving a big portion of the historic Music Bastion wall that would be buried by the ongoing $35 million state park renovation project.

                The plan, unveiled at a morning news conference yesterday at the Hilton Pittsburgh hotel across the street from the 18-acre park, would preserve more than two-thirds of the moat and wall in its current configuration except for a 100-to-150-foot section at the north end that would be filled in.

                It also proposes a pedestrian drawbridge and walkway over the moat, at the original location of the fort's main gate, that would help facilitate pedestrian movement, a stated goal of the existing renovation plan for the 35-year-old park.

                The 11th-hour proposal was made as work crews continued to rip out old landscaping, concrete and asphalt in the 18-acre park. Although some of that concrete and asphalt has been dumped into the north end of the moat and crushed, no new debris has been dumped into the moat trench for the past two days.

                "The state should immediately stop all demolition, land clearing and excavation at this Historic Landmark," said Michael Nixon, an historic preservation consultant and attorney for the Preservation Society, "and prepare a comprehensive archeological and cultural resource management plan ... and adjust their work plans accordingly."

                The restored Music Bastion is the only existing remnant of the original Fort Pitt, the largest British fort in North America, and contains original, 250-year-old hand-made bricks in a wall that sits atop the fort's original 71/2-foot-thick stone foundation.

                The current renovation plan would fill in the entire moat to create a flat "great lawn" on the city-side of the park for concerts. A narrow, inlaid stone outline of the Fort Pitt walls would be imbedded in the lawn.

                "The plan to bury the bastion is an abysmal idea, an historical sacrilege," said Richard Lang, an archeologist who was crew chief on the excavation that uncovered the bastion in 1953. "Pittsburgh is throwing away its roots if it buries this. A surface outline doesn't give any sense of Fort Pitt like this wall does."

                Mr. Lang was highly critical of the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources' final cultural resources report on the park's archeological values, and of, what he called, the state's hastily conceived plan to protect the historic wall from damage as the adjacent moat is filled in with construction debris.

                Mr. Nixon said the burial of the Music Bastion wall was a violation of the state constitution and historic preservation laws, but stopped just short of saying that the society would go to court to stop the filling of the moat -- the trench around the outline of Fort Pitt -- and the bastion's burial.

                The DCNR has one last chance to recognize the historical significance of the National Historic Landmark and change its park renovation plan, Mr. Nixon said, "before they're ordered to do so by a higher authority."

                He said the DCNR, which owns the state park property and is overseeing the renovation work, has recently refused to meet with the preservation society about its concerns.

                Christina Novak, a spokeswoman for the DCNR, said the department won't respond specifically to the alternative proposal until it receives a copy from the preservation society and has a chance to review it. Mr. Nixon said a copy of the group's proposal will be sent to the department today.

                "We would be happy to take a look at it, with the understanding that a contract with deadlines and a budget for the first phase of work at Point State Park is already in motion," Ms. Novak said.

                Wilford Rouleau, engineering professor emeritus at Carnegie Mellon University and a preservation society board member, said the group's alternative proposal is a practical solution to the impasse, and, if addressed immediately, won't entail additional costs.

                "While we can't prevent the damage done already to the historic resources on site, it's not too late for Governor Rendell and DCNR Secretary Michael DiBerardinis to do the right thing," Mr. Rouleau said. "We look forward to an invitation to meet with them again to resolve this major controversy."
                Yup. I read this earlier on an archaeology site and I only hope that they will listen to the pro-Ft. Pitt people. They are risking throwing away or severly damaging a priceless archaeological site.
                "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Disrespecting a park & Pittsburgh's history

                  By Richard M. Voelker

                  PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW

                  Tuesday, January 16, 2007


                  Burying the remnants of old Fort Pitt is pretty much a done deal. Unfortunately, we never seem to learn.

                  Well, there you have it. Despite commonwealth promises to "walk the site again," it's now too late to save the Fort Pitt wall remnants at Point State Park.

                  The "stay out" fencing is all in place, the "no trespassing" signs have all been hung, the half-century-old trees have been felled and the threatening piles of concrete rubble are poised at graveside, awaiting the final death knell to begin filling.

                  So just in a few months shy of the fort's 250th anniversary, its remains will be buried under a newly leveled carnival site.

                  But did this site have to sit so flagrantly astride what little is left of our city's rapidly shrinking, international heritage -- our unique historic location that "transformed the world"? Talk about irreverence.

                  Shame on those who aided and abetted this process. And most particularly, shame on the following:

                  Gov. Ed Rendell ("Ed," our friend in Harrisburg): He could have stopped this senseless process with just one phone call. But he didn't.

                  Michael DiBerardinis, secretary of the state Department of Conservation & Natural Resources: It's always easier to say "yes" than "no" to a longtime political buddy like the governor, particularly when he's your boss. Therefore, for his sake in future situations, I suggest he try to remember that the hard choice is frequently the right one. So try to commit this phrase to memory: "Speak truth to power."

                  Barbara Franco, director of the Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission: When Point State Park was turned over to the commission for safekeeping, its adopted master plan stipulated that it be managed for passive use and historic interpretation. But at the behest of the Riverlife Task Force, Ms. Franco knowingly ignored these policy guidelines, a decision that was not only arrogant, but potentially illegal, given recent court findings involving similar disrespectful impacts of the Gettysburg Tower on the adjacent Gettysburg National Military Park.

                  Christine Davis, archaeological consultant to the Riverlife Task Force: It was a career-enhancing "no-brainer" to write a report that condoned the Department of National Resources' plan to "cover over" the exposed fort wall sections to create a more level day-use recreation site.

                  However, since the region's sole claim to fame is currently linked to these same, now-visible artifacts, isn't it counterproductive to bury them just to provide a safer noshing environment for chubby festival-goers?

                  Marion Pressley, the Boston-area landscape design consultant: It takes more than a modicum of chutzpah for an out-of-town design consultant to come to Pittsburgh and ignore an existing historical park's 50-year-old management policies. Particularly since they were developed by Ralph Griswold, a Pittsburgh landscape architect, who's also world-renowned for his site restoration work at Williamsburg, Va. After this audacious beginning, Ms. Pressley then wrote a report sanctioning DNR's plan to rebury the previously excavated fort remains.

                  And that's about it. Despite numerous stories in local papers and on television, local preservation organizations (like the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, the History & Landmarks Foundation and The Heinz History Center) were conspicuously absent from public discussion. Their combined silence was indeed deafening, almost as loud as that coming from the young mayor's office.

                  So, it's pretty much a done deal. Unfortunately, we never seem to learn. But if we're real, real lucky, maybe after another 30 years or so of Point State Park's jarring fireworks, screaming jet skis and disruptive rock "concerts," some fed-up Pittsburgher might finally exclaim, "Hey, enough with the noise! I can't think! Let's go back to something quieter.
                  "How about digging up some history?"

                  Richard M. Voelker, a semi-retired open space planner and advocate, lives on the North Side.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    And the drama continues....


                    Point State Park find may be part of Fort Pitt

                    Preservation expert believes workers hit fort's casement

                    Friday, April 13, 2007
                    By Mark Belko, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

                    Crews digging in Point State Park may have unearthed a true treasure.

                    While excavating in the park recently, workers discovered a piece of log that appears to be part of the original Fort Pitt, said Christina Novak, spokeswoman for the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, the park's owner.

                    But members of one local group critical of the way the Downtown park's renovation work has been handled said the state initially did not know what a priceless find it had on its hands. They're worried it might not take adequate measures to document and protect such treasures.

                    The fort, dating to the earliest days of Pittsburgh's history, was a British stronghold during the French and Indian War and headquarters for the western theater during the American Revolutionary War.

                    One historic preservation consultant, Michael Nixon, believes workers struck one of the fort's casements. Some of the casements were used to store gunpowder and weapons, but this one would have been used for food and provisions. The discovery was made near the portal bridge on the city side of the park.

                    The casement would have been part of the fort's north wall, apparently the same wall unearthed during work in the park in 1953 and then buried again.

                    This particular casement, on the Allegheny River side of the fort, is significant because it would have included an underground passage to a sally port, which served as a secret entry and exit from the outpost.

                    Ms. Novak could not confirm that what was discovered during the digging was part of the casement. She said the state is awaiting a report and recommendation from Brooke Blades, an archaeologist working at Point State Park for consultant A.D. Marble & Co.

                    Richard Lang, a retired archaeologist, said the casement and the Music Bastion, which is being buried as part of the park's renovation, are the only two points that can be tied to the overall form of the original fort.

                    "What is left of the fort is a mosaic of pieces intermixed with 20th-century and 19th-century disturbances, so any piece is precious," he said. "It's a miracle that it survived to this point."

                    Mr. Nixon and Mr. Lang, founding members of SaveFortPitt.org, have criticized the $35 million park improvement project, with Mr. Nixon saying the state is converting "hallowed ground" into a "carnival site."

                    They were dissatisfied with the safeguards put in place by state officials to protect the Music Bastion during its filling and have complained that the commonwealth is not taking proper care in dealing with the park's historic artifacts.

                    Both argued that the recent discovery is a perfect example, claiming officials initially dismissed the find as non-18th-century because of its well-preserved condition and allowed crews to continue digging, damaging some of the fort's logs. Mr. Nixon said it was only after he and Mr. Lang approached the state that it decided to investigate further.

                    Mr. Lang said he saw three to four of the logs sticking out of the trench when he walked the site about two weeks ago. When he returned Friday, "a foot or two" of the logs had been cut off, he said.

                    That was unfortunate, he said, because he had warned the state last fall that there could be historic remains in the section of the park where the work was being done.

                    In fact, a section of the fort's north wall was excavated in 1953 as part of parkway work and then reburied. Mr. Nixon and Mr. Lang believe the same section was unearthed in the most recent digging.

                    Ms. Novak disputed their version of events, saying that Mr. Blades believes the damage to the logs occurred in the past, not with the recent work. She said the area where the discovery was made has been filled in while the state awaits recommendations from the archaeologist.

                    Mr. Lang, who was part of the 1964 excavation of the Music Bastion, is concerned about what steps the state will take to protect and document the latest Fort Pitt discovery. He said he was told Friday that the plan was to dig one foot to either side of the wall, figure out the orientation, and "let it go at that."

                    He believes extensive measurements should be taken, that there should be an investigation of the sally port, and that extreme care should be taken in filling in the site so it is well-preserved for future generations.

                    "We have the benefit of knowing what it is. It is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, quite literally," he said.

                    Ms. Novak said the state is awaiting recommendations from its archaeologist as to how to document the discovery and whether any further investigation is necessary.

                    "I don't think we've ruled anything out," she said.

                    She added, though, that the state must balance the historical significance of the park with community interests. She said there has been significant support for the improvements being done.

                    There are plans, she said, to do a better job in identifying the park's historic features and explaining its historic significance.

                    "We do respect that there is real historical significance to that area and we're acting on that," she said.
                    "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks for posting this Hiredgoon. I had no idea this was going on. It doesnt suprise me though. This state is full of money grubbing Buisnessmen/Politicians. Our illustrious Gov. Ed Rendell, tried a few years ago to build a Casino on part of the Gettysburg Battlefield, thank God that didnt happen.
                      http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/d...200pixwide.jpg

                      Kampfgruppe - A Wargaming Clan Since 1998

                      NorbertSnyderJr.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I will be seriously ashamed of Americans if they don't step up and save this site.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The "Save Fort Pitt" website now has pics of the work to cover up the bastion with concrete and asphalt debris. You can also still sign the online petition and voice your concerns in the comments section. Unfortunately it looks like the PA gov. including the Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources don't give a crap about our national history and are going ahead with the project no matter what anyone says or what historical features they have to destroy.
                          "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by HiredGoon View Post
                            The "Save Fort Pitt" website now has pics of the work to cover up the bastion with concrete and asphalt debris. You can also still sign the online petition and voice your concerns in the comments section. Unfortunately it looks like the PA gov. including the Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources don't give a crap about our national history and are going ahead with the project no matter what anyone says or what historical features they have to destroy.
                            I posted this story on my clans websited Hiredgoon and managed to russle up about 10 signatures in a day or so. I know its not much but its 10 more than they a few days ago. Also i have some contacts in Pittsburgh, being a resident of PA. myself, and i have contacted them and informed them of the website and they are organizing a signup drive as well.
                            http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/d...200pixwide.jpg

                            Kampfgruppe - A Wargaming Clan Since 1998

                            NorbertSnyderJr.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              What a joke Pittsburgh is

                              A song and a dance for Pittsburgh's 250th birthday could be eligible for a $25,000 grant from the Allegheny Regional Asset District, officials said.

                              A grant program totalling $250,000 will provide money to "students of all ages" for projects to be completed as part of the city's birthday celebration next year.


                              I wonder if the money could be used to uncover Fort Pitt instead of a stupid song & dance?

                              Heres the link to whole article

                              http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pitt.../s_506936.html

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