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  • Rosie the Riveter Museum

    This museum is small but packed full of WWII history. It provides detailed history of mobilization on the "home front" during World War II, with emphasis on the city of Richmond, California and its Kaiser shipyards that built Liberty and Victory ships in support of the war effort during WWII.

    The museum show & tell the culture of women workers during WWII. The top floor has a rich collection of text, artifacts and stories about the entrance of thousands of women into the labor force and how they worked male dominated occupations to contribute to the war effort. The bottom floor shows films and has speakers. The day I went, there were a few elderly volunteers who talked about their own experiences as workers. That was an extra treat.


    Rosie The Riveter Trust
    As the U.S. faced a new and daunting challenge of a global war in the 1940s, people on the home front came together as never before. The stories of their struggles, which broke barriers and shaped many of today’s best social innovations, chart a path for new vision today.

    Rosie the Riveter is a reminder to all of us to try new things, test our limits, and believe in ourselves and others. These tales of dedication and courage can inspire us!

    An unusual urban national park, the Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historical Park is located on the waterfront in Richmond, CA. It is the flagship national park for telling stories of the home front efforts across the United States. Park sites you can visit include the Oil House Visitor Center, the Rosie the Riveter Memorial, the historic Ford Assembly plant, Maritime Childcare Center, and more. Visit us and learn!

    http://www.rosietheriveter.org
    Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front
    National Historical Park - California
    http://www.nps.gov/rori/index.htm
    "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

  • #2
    BTW...admission is FREE.

    They do have a donation box at the entrance that every visitor should contribute to.
    "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

    Comment


    • #3
      Interestingly in the UK we had Rosies and Annies the Armourer's etc etc as early as WW1 but no museums in part due to the unions who didn't want to admit to what women could do.
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

      Comment


      • #4
        Rare Color Photographs of Women at Work During WW2
        http://www.boredpanda.com/women-at-w...estored-color/
        "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

        "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

        Comment


        • #5
          Rare WWII Colour Photos: 1940s Working Women
          http://anthonylukephotography.blogsp...s-working.html
          "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

          "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

          Comment


          • #6
            The real Rosie the Riveter...




            Janice Rickard was a 19-year-old Rosie the Riveter who built B-17 bombers during World War II.

            Now 92, she expressed amazement that it has been 74 years since she wielded a riveting gun at Boeing’s Seattle aircraft plant.

            Rickard joined millions of women who worked in the war effort, producing airplanes, ships, tanks, weapons and more.

            “It was a thrill to be part of the women on the home front,” she said Tuesday at her home in Vancouver. “It didn’t pay much, but it was patriotic work, so it was priceless. My best memories,” Rickard said, touching the embroidered Boeing badge on the lapel of her crisp navy blue jacket.

            “Telling the aircraft riveting story was important to me,” she said. “We mostly hear about the (Kaiser) shipyard workers in this area.”

            The small-town girl originally from La Grande, Ore., graduated from Centralia High School in 1941, about six months before Japan bombed the U.S. Navy fleet at Pearl Harbor and catapulted the U.S. into the war. Shortly after her graduation, Rickard read a Boeing advertisement recruiting women to attend an aircraft worker training program in nearby Chehalis.

            “I signed up as soon as I saw the ads,” she said. “That was a great opportunity for me.”

            Rickard was trained to become a riveter and rivet bucker. Standing inside the plane, a rivet bucker held a small metal bar against the airplane skin so that the riveter working outside the plane had a solid surface to work against.

            “Women’s small hands are ideal for riveting planes,” Rickard said. “Aircraft rivets can be very tiny.”

            After her training, she moved to Seattle and shared an apartment with a co-worker.

            “We rode a bus crammed full of people who worked at Boeing,” she recalled.

            Initially, she was paid 62 1/2 cents per hour, but by the time she left the job to start her family, she was paid 93 cents per hour.

            Rickard discovered early on that she had an aptitude for mechanics and working with power tools. Her shop did minor assemblies.

            “The largest component of the B-17 we assembled in that shop was the camera well. It fits underneath the B-17,” Rickard said. “Otherwise, what we were doing was putting in the big struts that go across the plane that hold the plane together.”

            Early in the war, Boeing produced 60 aircraft per month, but later production increased to 362 aircraft per month.

            http://www.columbian.com/news/2016/a...ncouver-woman/
            "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

            "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by MarkV View Post
              Interestingly in the UK we had Rosies and Annies the Armourer's etc etc as early as WW1 but no museums in part due to the unions who didn't want to admit to what women could do.
              We also had women working in the factories during WW1 & WW2 some on my fathers side worked building shells, riveting, welding etc...
              Canada Car had a female Mechanical Engineer at the time Elsie MacGill (Queen of the Hurricanes).
              Rosies of the North: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosies_of_the_North
              Canada Car & Foundry in Fort William, Ontario: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Car_and_Foundry
              I believe that the British designed Hurricane was the basis for fighter aircraft like the Curtis-Wright Helldiver.
              Enemy air craft or designs were hard to copy as they were few and far between.
              Constructing an air frame, engine, weapons system, landing gear & testing the lot took lots of time easier to copy an aircraft already built and proven like Avro Arrow much latter...

              Regards,Patrick

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                Interestingly in the UK we had Rosies and Annies the Armourer's etc etc as early as WW1 but no museums in part due to the unions who didn't want to admit to what women could do.
                Interesting observation. American unions would have felt the same way. My history classes study major changes in working conditions during the Industrial Age, but most of them were decades before WWII.

                It seems like there was revitalization on Women's war efforts over time in the 90s. I think that's when the Women's War Museum opened in DC.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
                  Interesting observation. American unions would have felt the same way. My history classes study major changes in working conditions during the Industrial Age, but most of them were decades before WWII.

                  It seems like there was revitalization on Women's war efforts over time in the 90s. I think that's when the Women's War Museum opened in DC.
                  The role of women here on the home front usually involved work on assembly lines as early as WW1.
                  It could be in Artillery, Aircraft or Ship manufacturing at Northern Engineering & Supply Company, Canada Car or Port Arthur Ship Building Company.
                  http://news.ourontario.ca/results?fsu=Ammunition

                  Some men refused to work along side of women on the factory floor.

                  Regards,Patrick

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I did some research on the subject as part of my recent MA. The Unions in Britain in 1914 were by and large against employing women to replace men who had gone off to the forces, mainly because they said the men might not get their jobs back after the war and women wouldn't be any good anyway (which seems to be an argument that contradicts itself). The Railway unions were particularly truculent over this. The government had to promise that a] the women would be let go when the men came home and b] they wouldn't be trained in really skilled jobs like operating lathes or driving locomotives. As the war went on more and more women were employed in more and more jobs traditionally seen as mens' work. Plenty of women operated lathes although none got further on the footplate than cleaning out the firebox. At least one railway recruited and trained women for the railway police and there is a photo of a squad of women police in British Railways at War 1914-1918. Interestingly this is dated a year earlier than the first 'official' date for a policewoman and doubly interesting one is an asian lady. (The female railway police were apparently better at dealing with drunken soldiers on leave than the male coppers as the latter often found themselves drawn into a fight).
                    In Germany the unions also objected but for different reasons. Under German law conscientious objectors did not exist and the only way, other than ill health, to avoid military service was if ones's job was essential and no one, not liable for service, could do it. If women could do men's jobs equally well then a lot more men would end up at the front. This is well covered in "The War from Within". In general fewer women worked in industry in Germany than in Britain.
                    Last edited by MarkV; 20 Apr 16, 12:11.
                    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                      I did some research on the subject as part of my recent MA. The Unions in Britain in 1914 were by and large against employing women to replace men who had gone off to the forces, mainly because they said the men might not get their jobs back after the war and women wouldn't be any good anyway (which seems to be an argument that contradicts itself). The Railway unions were particularly truculent over this. The government had to promise that a] the women would be let go when the men came home and b] they wouldn't be trained in really skilled jobs like operating lathes or driving locomotives. As the war went on more and more women were employed in more and more jobs traditionally seen as mens' work. Plenty of women operated lathes although none got further on the footplate than cleaning out the firebox. At least one railway recruited and trained women for the railway police and there is a photo of a squad of women police in British Railways at War 1914-1918. Interestingly this is dated a year earlier than the first 'official' date for a policewoman and doubly interesting one is an asian lady. (The female railway police were apparently better at dealing with drunken soldiers on leave than the male coppers as the latter often found themselves drawn into a fight).
                      In Germany the unions also objected but for different reasons. Under German law conscientious objectors did not exist and the only way, other than ill health, to avoid military service was if ones's job was essential and no one, not liable for service, could do it. If women could do men's jobs equally well then a lot more men would end up at the front. This is well covered in "The War from Within". In general fewer women worked in industry in Germany than in Britain.
                      Some of the jobs were more dangerous than others one could get killed doing them right here on the home front.
                      Fire Wipes Out Whole Plant of Copps Stove Co. Corner of Syndicate & Walsh Streets, Fort William, Ontario.
                      Munitions Manufacturing 4.5 Inch High Explosive Shells...
                      http://news.ourontario.ca/28356341/data?n=12
                      http://www.tbpl.ca/coppstove

                      Happy Birthday Queen Elizabeth!


                      Regards, Patrick
                      Last edited by SmackUm; 21 Apr 16, 11:21.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SmackUm View Post
                        Some of the jobs were more dangerous than others one could get killed doing them right here on the home front.
                        Fire Wipes Out Whole Plant of Copps Stove Co. Corner of Syndicate & Walsh Streets, Fort William, Ontario.
                        Munitions Manufacturing 4.5 Inch High Explosive Shells...
                        http://news.ourontario.ca/28356341/data?n=12

                        Happy Birthday Queen Elizabeth!


                        Regards, Patrick
                        Indeed there were a number of major munition plants explosions in the UK and the USA and hundreds killed
                        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                          Indeed there were a number of major munition plants explosions in the UK and the USA and hundreds killed
                          Yes...I could see that happening here and there all it takes is a little distraction when dealing with manufacturing of explosives...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SmackUm View Post
                            Yes...I could see that happening here and there all it takes is a little distraction when dealing with manufacturing of explosives...
                            There was a strong possibility of sabotage in one of the US explosions
                            Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                            Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                              There was a strong possibility of sabotage in one of the US explosions
                              There could be cases of Sabotage whether on purpose or not the damage done would have equal results.
                              I can remember hearing about full rods being used as fill during the welding process in the Port Arthur Ship Building Company.
                              On further examination when the hull was arc aired full length welding rods fell out of the hull of one Corvette hull prior to back passing w/7018.
                              Well in stead of trying to figure out who did it they fired the whole welding crew and started a new checking the entire hull over again.
                              Nothing worse than having a welded hull like a Liberty Ship crack in half in the middle of the North Atlantic.

                              Cheers, Patrick

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