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Sci-Fi Authors: Favorites and those of note

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  • Sci-Fi Authors: Favorites and those of note

    While my favorite is the Grand Master, Robert A. Heinlein, and I intend to write about him in near future, this is one mentioned on the google page that pops up when I first go on the 'net; Octavia E. Butler

    Frankly, I don't recall knowing of her or having read any of her works, but she and her writings sound interesting. Some basic links;
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octavia_E._Butler
    https://www.goodreads.com/author/sho...tavia_E_Butler
    https://www.cnn.com/2018/06/22/cultu...ler/index.html
    https://heavy.com/news/2018/06/octavia-e-butler/
    https://www.inverse.com/article/4631...-works-to-read
    Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

  • #2
    I have so many but here are some

    Larry Niven
    Cyril Kornbluth
    Keith Laumer.
    Ian M Banks
    Eric Frank Russell
    John Varley

    and there are others who I regard as having written some brilliant books but also some stinkers

    These include
    Robert Heinlein
    Harry Harrison
    Fredrick Pohl
    Jack Vance
    Philip José Farmer


    and there is Philip K Dick where I think I am add odds with many as I didn't enjoy many of the books people rave about but did some that they don't - like The Eye in the Sky

    but there are also non SF authors who still wrote some prophetic SF stories such as

    E M Forster - The Machine Stops
    Rudyard Kipling -With the Night Mail, As Easy as ABC

    Forster predicts a world with tomorrows Intedrnet access and shoping and Kipling cold fusion, remote controlled and automious machines as well as mazers and sonic weapons and all before WW1.
    Last edited by MarkV; 22 Jun 18, 18:59.
    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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    • #3
      Douglas Adams (Hitchhiker's et al.)
      Jack Chalker
      Piers Anthony
      C J Cherryh

      to add a few

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      • #4
        Many of the above as well as David Weber.
        Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedy. -- Ernest Benn

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        • #5
          David Webber is really good, Travis S. Taylor is a physics major who really brings the science into scifi.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Travis_S._Taylor
          Credo quia absurdum.


          Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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          • #6
            Good authors so far. I would like to mention SM Sterling, David Drake, and George RR Martin. Many struggle with extending a story line after the first couple of books. Poor Martin is especially having a problem.

            Pruitt
            Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

            Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

            by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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            • #7
              William H. Keith Jr.
              Who writes under a bewildering number of pen names; Ian Douglas, Robert Cain, H. Jay Riker and Keith Douglass just to name a few

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_H._Keith_Jr.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willia...._bibliography




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              • #8
                As i pointed out in the OP here, I consider Robert Anson Heinlein to have been THE "Grand Master" of "modern Sci-Fi", c. mid 1930s to 1940-50s+, and one whom set and defined many memes within such;

                Robert A. Heinlein
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_A._Heinlein

                Another of NOTE I've only recently stumbled upon in past few years, has been around for some decades now and is considered by many to be the successor to RAH;

                Spider Robinson
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spider_Robinson

                More on both of these later; ... for now, just more archiving ...
                Last edited by G David Bock; 01 Jul 18, 01:40.
                Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                Comment


                • #9
                  Another for consideration, iconic as it may seem, and of note for a few other pursuits and interests/activities, would be ;

                  L. Ron Hubbard
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L._Ron_Hubbard

                  Though best known for starting his (for profit) "religion" of Scientology (Dynatetics); Hubbard started out as a science fiction author of some style and note. By the mid to late 1940s, his association with Jack Whiteside Parsons and the "MoonChild Project" to which it seems RAH had some level of association, would result in one of the more "stranger than truth" events of more recent~modern times ...

                  Jack Parsons (rocket engineer)
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_P...ocket_engineer)

                  Other reference notes;

                  Strange Angel: The Otherworldly Life of Rocket Scientist John Whiteside Parsons
                  https://www.amazon.com/Strange-Angel.../dp/0156031795 Ordo Templi Orientis

                  Aleister Crowley Scientology, L. Ron Hubbard, Marjorie Cameron Parsons, Jack Whiteside Parsons, Kenneth Anger ... Science Fiction/Fantasy

                  http://www.parareligion.ch/dplanet/staley/staley11.htm

                  John Whiteside Parsons: Sex, Rockets, and Magick
                  http://www.ghosttheory.com/2013/03/1...ets-and-magick

                  Just some items of interest to get a ball rolling ...




                  Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                  Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I want to give a shout out to one of my favorites, Robert Howard. He created "Conan".

                    Pruitt
                    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ^ Good one! Wish I'd thought of him.
                      Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                      Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The Honor Harrington series is some of the best of the space opera genre. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honor_Harrington
                        Credo quia absurdum.


                        Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
                          I want to give a shout out to one of my favorites, Robert Howard. He created "Conan".

                          Pruitt
                          And Kull of Atlantis along with Bran MacMorn of the Celts.

                          Heinlein, A. E.Van Vogt, Pohl Anderson, Phillip K. Dick, Edgar Rice Burroughs - the entire Warlord of Mars series among others - and Verne, one of the fathers of the genre along with people like A.E. Merrit and H.P. Lovecraft.

                          And, of course, the authors of the Berserker series and the BOLO series.
                          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                          • #14
                            Isaac Asimov: Becoming Educated
                            ...
                            If there is one thing we can conclusively say about Isaac Asimov, it’s that he could write.

                            His body of work extends to over 500 books, many that he edited and quite a few that he penned. To add to that, he was never bound to a specific domain. Although most famous as a science fiction writer, he also published on religion, history, and many more topics.

                            It was his insatiable curiosity and his unrelenting drive to push himself that took him from a young Russian immigrant to maybe one of the most beloved US authors of the 20th-century.

                            The signs were always there, of course. As a young kid, he spent his days lost in his mind asking questions and creating imaginary worlds. He read books, and he loved knowledge.

                            If anyone in his general vicinity had a question they needed an answer to, you could reliably bet that Asimov would have an answer or at the very least point you in the right direction.

                            Part of this related to his gifted mind, but a bigger part was that he was simply well-educated.

                            Many tend to think of being educated as something that has to do with the number of years of schooling we have or the degrees we earn. Asimov did indeed meet those criteria, but his real education was broader than that. It was deeper than what he learned from instruction.1

                            In fact, this real education is what added to the subtle depth of his fiction, and perhaps more importantly, it’s what allowed him to reliably write about so many diverse, interesting topics. Fortunately, exploring his story, we can dissect precisely how he did that by:

                            • Expanding the boundaries of the imagination

                            • Learning at the edge of his knowledge

                            • Respecting the importance of self-education

                            Becoming educated is a gift of the modern times we live in. And it’s a gift anyone can earn.
                            ...
                            The belief that the purpose of school and teachers is to disseminate knowledge is exactly backward. Nobody learns by passive consumption. They learn when they want to learn.

                            They greatest curriculums and the greatest educators aren’t those that can fill your brain with the highest number of facts. It goes deeper than that. The best of the best only have one job: to evoke a sense of curiosity in you and to teach you to enjoy learning for its own sake.

                            There is no such thing as an education passing on knowledge. There is only self-education, which means that once a seed is planted in front of you, you will want to water it yourself.
                            ...
                            https://www.designluck.com/becoming-educated/
                            Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                            Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Why Science Fiction Is the Most Important Genre
                              ....
                              Yuval Noah Harari, author of the best-selling books Sapiens and Homo Deus, is a big fan of science fiction, and includes an entire chapter about it in his new book 21 Lessons for the 21st Century.

                              “Today science fiction is the most important artistic genre,” Harari says in Episode 325 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. “It shapes the understanding of the public on things like artificial intelligence and biotechnology, which are likely to change our lives and society more than anything else in the coming decades.”

                              Because science fiction plays such a key role in shaping public opinion, he would like to see more science fiction that grapples with realistic issues like AI creating a permanent ‘useless class’ of workers. “If you want to raise public awareness of such issues, a good science fiction movie could be worth not one, but a hundred articles in Science or Nature, or even a hundred articles in the New York Times,” he says.
                              ...
                              https://www.wired.com/2018/09/geeks-...l-noah-harari/
                              Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                              Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                              Comment

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