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  • #31
    Lastest redux ...

    Sci-Fi Writer Jules Verne Wrote Predictions About The Future – And He Was Eerily Accurate

    https://historicalpost.com/anthropol...rm=3908217&l=a

    Slide show warning ...
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

    Comment


    • #32
      That was like two dozen ads before I even got to the predictions...
      Wisdom is personal

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      • #33
        Clicking on the "next page" took me right to it. Must be either your server or computer
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
        “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

        Comment


        • #34
          The Rise of Dismal Science Fiction

          To understand our economic system, we need speculative stories.
          .............


          After William Gibson coined the term cyberspace in his 1984 novel Neuromancer, it almost immediately entered our everyday vocabulary. A play on information theorist Norbert Wiener’s idea of cybernetics, cyberspace became shorthand for the world inside our networked computers, that digital landscape where we met to chat, play games, and exchange intimate secrets. Today, cyber is part of our political language, too, used to describe everything from digital warfare to online intelligence gathering. What often gets forgotten about the origin story of this term is that Gibson wasn’t just talking the future of computers, but of a world where tech corporations rule every aspect of our lives.

          We’re used to science fiction providing us with commentary on technology, and vocabulary to discuss its more worrisome consequences. But underlying our fears of robots stealing our jobs or corporations turning us into consumer droids are more basic anxieties about money—and science fiction is increasingly reflecting that. For audiences grappling with the fear of poverty, or simply bewildered by postmodern economics, stories like Game of Thrones, Black Panther, and Malka Older’s critically acclaimed novel Infomocracy function like Aesop’s Fables for the 21st century.
          .......
          https://getpocket.com/explore/item/t...=pocket-newtab
          Last edited by G David Bock; 29 Jul 20, 18:18.
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
          “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

          Comment


          • #35
            Best place for now .....
            Eight Go Mad in Arizona: How a Lockdown Experiment Went Horribly Wrong

            In the 1990s, a troupe of hippies spent two years sealed inside a dome called Biosphere 2. They ended up starving and gasping for breath. As a new documentary Spaceship Earth tells their story, we meet the ‘biospherians.’

            .....
            It sounds like a sci-fi movie, or the weirdest series of Big Brother ever. Eight volunteers wearing snazzy red jumpsuits seal themselves into a hi-tech glasshouse that’s meant to perfectly replicate Earth’s ecosystems. They end up starving, gasping for air and at each other’s throats – while the world’s media looks on.

            But the Biosphere 2 experiment really did happen. Running from 1991 to 1993, it is remembered as a failure, if it is remembered at all – a hubristic, pseudo-scientific experiment that was never going to accomplish its mission. However, as the new documentary Spaceship Earth shows, the escapade is a cautionary tale, now that the outside world – Biosphere 1, if you prefer – is itself coming to resemble an apocalyptic sci-fi world. Looking back, it’s amazing that Biosphere 2 even happened at all, not least because the people behind it started out as a hippy theatre group.

            “Just the fact that the same number of people came out as went in is a triumph,” says Mark Nelson, one of the original eight “biospherians”. Far from a failure, he regards Biosphere 2 as an unsung achievement in human exploration, as do many others. “I like to say we built it not because we had the answers. We built it to find out what we didn’t know.”
            .......
            https://getpocket.com/explore/item/e...=pocket-newtab
            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
            “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

            Comment


            • #36
              The thing that did the participants in most effectively were the ants and cockroaches that took over the facility... Both were put in the mix for some reason and both thrived in the environment.

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              • #37
                I am actually wondering with the rush to do everything online the world of the strangely prescient shot story of 1909 (!) by E.M. Forster "The Machine Stops" or the elite Asimov's "The Naked Sun" isn't where we are going...

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by LtCol View Post
                  The first mention of a mobile phone that I know was the 1947 book Space Cadet by Robert Heinlein. One of the characters phone rings and he takes it out of his pocket while another remarks that he had left his in his suitcase so that his mother could not keep calling
                  Duck Tracey got his first wrist communicator in 1946. Ironic connection to the current police state perhaps.
                  We hunt the hunters

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by wolfhnd View Post

                    Duck Tracey got his first wrist communicator in 1946. Ironic connection to the current police state perhaps.
                    My wife has a wristwatch cellphone. What's the connection to a "police state"?

                    Frankly, I'd rather have Superman around fighting crime.
                    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                      Lastest redux ...

                      Sci-Fi Writer Jules Verne Wrote Predictions About The Future – And He Was Eerily Accurate

                      https://historicalpost.com/anthropol...rm=3908217&l=a

                      Slide show warning ...
                      Some people think Verne was walk-in, like da Vinci and others thrughout history. People who seem to know what's coming.
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

                        My wife has a wristwatch cellphone. What's the connection to a "police state"?

                        Frankly, I'd rather have Superman around fighting crime.
                        Our electronic gadget addiction has made us so much easier to spy on, track, and manipulate.
                        We hunt the hunters

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by wolfhnd View Post

                          Our electronic gadget addiction has made us so much easier to spy on, track, and manipulate.
                          Unquestionably, and yet it isn't enough. Many in government, and some dirtbags like Gates, want to microchip us.

                          BTW - keep in mind that much of the electronics that now are used against us are manufactured and sold to us by Japan.
                          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Why Futurism Has a Cultural Blindspot

                            We predicted cell phones, but not women in the workplace.

                            ....
                            In early 1999, during the halftime of a University of Washington basketball game, a time capsule from 1927 was opened. Among the contents of this portal to the past were some yellowing newspapers, a Mercury dime, a student handbook, and a building permit. The crowd promptly erupted into boos. One student declared the items “dumb.”

                            Such disappointment in time capsules seems to run endemic, suggests William E. Jarvis in his book Time Capsules: A Cultural History. A headline from The Onion, he notes, sums it up: “Newly unearthed time capsule just full of useless old crap.” Time capsules, after all, exude a kind of pathos: They show us that the future was not quite as advanced as we thought it would be, nor did it come as quickly. The past, meanwhile, turns out to not be as radically distinct as we thought.

                            In his book Predicting the Future, Nicholas Rescher writes that “we incline to view the future through a telescope, as it were, thereby magnifying and bringing nearer what we can manage to see.” So too do we view the past through the other end of the telescope, making things look farther away than they actually were, or losing sight of some things altogether.

                            These observations apply neatly to technology. We don’t have the personal flying cars we predicted we would. Coal, notes the historian David Edgerton in his book The Shock of the Old, was a bigger source of power at the dawn of the 21st century than in sooty 1900; steam was more significant in 1900 than 1800.
                            As Amazon experiments with aerial drone delivery, its “same day” products are being moved through New York City thanks to that 19th-century killer app: the bicycle.

                            But when it comes to culture we tend to believe not that the future will be very different than the present day, but that it will be roughly the same. Try to imagine yourself at some future date. Where do you imagine you will be living? What will you be wearing? What music will you love?

                            Chances are, that person resembles you now. As the psychologist George Lowenstein and colleagues have argued, in a phenomenon they termed “projection bias,”1 people “tend to exaggerate the degree to which their future tastes will resemble their current tastes.”
                            ....
                            This over- and under-predicting is embedded into how we conceive of the future. “Futurology is almost always wrong,” the historian Judith Flanders suggested to me, “because it rarely takes into account behavioral changes.” And, she says, we look at the wrong things: “Transport to work, rather than the shape of work; technology itself, rather than how our behavior is changed by the very changes that technology brings.” It turns out that predicting who we will be is harder than predicting what we will be able to do.
                            ...
                            Like the hungry person who orders more food at dinner than they will ultimately want—to use an example from Lowenstein and colleagues—forecasters have a tendency to take something that is (in the language of behavioral economics) salient today, and assume that it will play an outsized role in the future. And what is most salient today? It is that which is novel, “disruptive,” and easily fathomed: new technology.

                            As the theorist Nassim Nicholas Taleb writes in Antifragile, “we notice what varies and changes more than what plays a larger role but doesn’t change. We rely more on water than on cell phones, but because water does not change and cell phones do, we are prone to thinking that cell phones play a larger role than they do.”
                            .....
                            In the same way that our focus on recent innovations causes people to overemphasize their importance, to see them as hastening a radically transformed future—like Google Glass was supposed to—the backward look is distorted so that technologies are rendered prematurely obsolete. The prescience of near-future speculations, like Bladerunner, comes less from uncannily predicting future technologies (it shows computer identification of voices, but Bell Labs was working on spectrographic analysis of human voices in the 1940s5) than in anticipating that new and old will be jarringly intermingled. Films that depict uniformly futuristic worlds are subtly unconvincing—much like historical period films in which cars on the street are all perfect specimens (because those are the only ones that have survived). Dirt and ruin are as much a part of the future as they are the past.

                            People in the innovation-obsessed present tend to overstate the impact of technology not only in the future, but also the present. We tend to imagine we are living in a world that could scarcely have been imagined a few decades ago. It is not uncommon to read assertions like: “Someone would have been unable at the beginning of the 20th century to even dream of what transportation would look like a half a century later.”6 And yet zeppelins were flying in 1900; a year before, in New York City, the first pedestrian had already been killed by an automobile. Was the notion of air travel, or the thought that the car was going to change life on the street, really so beyond envisioning—or is it merely the chauvinism of the present, peering with faint condescension at our hopelessly primitive predecessors?
                            ....
                            https://getpocket.com/explore/item/w...=pocket-newtab
                            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                            “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz

                            Comment

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