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  • G David Bock
    replied
    More indirect ref. material;
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/StarForce:_Alpha_Centauri
    https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/...r-conflict-25t
    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=starforce+...ages&ia=images

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Interesting addition for consideration;

    Jul 25, 2015,10:03am EDT

    A 300 Year Old Mystery Solved: Why Saturn's Moon Iapetus Is Half-Light, Half-Dark

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/ethansi.../#2073dc164e47

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  • G David Bock
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    So an assortment of related material and links (some repeats from earlier);
    ◄ FICTIONAL STARSHIPS Size COMPARISON ► 3D

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTPwbVqU6lc

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard_K._O%27Neill
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...ady-feel-stale
    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=o%27neil+a...ages&ia=images

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...for_Zero_Point

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...-soul-survivor

    https://www.enterprisemissions.com/
    https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/l...unaiapetus.htm
    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=iapetus+-+...ages&ia=images



    https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/l...apetus_077.jpg
    Last edited by G David Bock; 09 Oct 20, 05:34.

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
    The problems with the Tappist-1 system start with it having a red dwarf star at its center.

    For the planets to be in the habitable zone they have to be close enough that they are likely tidally locked to the star. Then you toss in that the star emits far more and much stronger solar flares and radiation than our star with the planets being much closer to it. This is likely to fry the side facing the star, if not most of the planet with radiation. Tidal locking is also likely to cause a more rapid cooling of a planet's core leading to a loss of any magnetic field shielding it. This too would argue that the planets are more likely to be like Mercury or Mars than Earth with little atmosphere, no magnetic shield, and fried on one side, frigid on the other.

    In our system had Jupiter been smaller Mars would likely have ended up larger and more like a cold Earth.
    This may tie in with above, FWIW.
    There remains the issue of Venus retrograde revolution on it's axis still, and the long "day", for a start.

    September 30, 2020
    Venus might be habitable today, if not for Jupiter

    https://phys.org/news/2020-09-venus-...y-jupiter.html

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    This piece goes into the issue of if life has to be carbon based ... therefore the question of finding such if we don't recognize it ...
    Are Aliens Hiding in Plain Sight?

    Several missions this year are seeking out life on the red planet. But would we recognize extraterrestrials if we found them?

    ....
    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/a...=pocket-newtab

    There's "life".
    Then there's intelligent life (as seen with livestock and pets).
    Then there's intelligent life able to make fire and melt metal.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
    The problems with the Tappist-1 system start with it having a red dwarf star at its center.

    For the planets to be in the habitable zone they have to be close enough that they are likely tidally locked to the star. Then you toss in that the star emits far more and much stronger solar flares and radiation than our star with the planets being much closer to it. This is likely to fry the side facing the star, if not most of the planet with radiation. Tidal locking is also likely to cause a more rapid cooling of a planet's core leading to a loss of any magnetic field shielding it. This too would argue that the planets are more likely to be like Mercury or Mars than Earth with little atmosphere, no magnetic shield, and fried on one side, frigid on the other.

    In our system had Jupiter been smaller Mars would likely have ended up larger and more like a cold Earth.
    That might well be a case. Challenge is the limited exploration done on the surfaces of other planets in our system to know more of their past/history.

    Venus might have been another Earth, or had that potential, but it appears to have been subject to major impact or other upheaval, literal flip, causing extreme changes in surface conditions and atmosphere.

    Mars also shows hint of damaging impact events though it might at one time be a sort of minimal Earth like habitability.

    BTW, from the Mars thread in Science...

    Ancient underground lakes discovered on Mars
    Mars could be home to more liquid water than we originally thought.
    ...
    Be sure to pack some arm floaties and a really big drill when you fly to Mars. There may be a whole world of water-filled ponds hiding beneath the southern ice cap on the dry and dusty planet.

    A new study led by researchers at Roma Tre University in Italy strengthens the case for a 2018 discovery of a hidden lake under the Martian polar ice, and then extends the find to include three new ponds.
    ...
    https://www.cnet.com/news/ancient-un...found-on-mars/
    ....

    In either case, I'd dispute the claims of orbital shape a major factor as cited in that link in my post preceding yours. Venus and Mars have as much circular as Earth. While Jupiter has it's gravitational influence, evidence suggests something else large and massive at one time put many of our planets askew.
    Last edited by G David Bock; 01 Oct 20, 13:28.

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  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    The problems with the Tappist-1 system start with it having a red dwarf star at its center.

    For the planets to be in the habitable zone they have to be close enough that they are likely tidally locked to the star. Then you toss in that the star emits far more and much stronger solar flares and radiation than our star with the planets being much closer to it. This is likely to fry the side facing the star, if not most of the planet with radiation. Tidal locking is also likely to cause a more rapid cooling of a planet's core leading to a loss of any magnetic field shielding it. This too would argue that the planets are more likely to be like Mercury or Mars than Earth with little atmosphere, no magnetic shield, and fried on one side, frigid on the other.

    In our system had Jupiter been smaller Mars would likely have ended up larger and more like a cold Earth.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Some stars could host seven habitable planets

    ...
    By creating a model to simulate planets of different sizes in orbit around a star, a team lead by astrobiologist Stephen Kane from UC Riverside was able to calculate that a star like the Sun could potentially support up to six habitable worlds, while larger stars could support seven.

    The researchers also determined that the reason our solar system only has one habitable world is because the planets' orbits aren't circular enough and Jupiter is hogging up a lot of the space.

    "It has a big effect on the habitability of our solar system because it's massive and disturbs other orbits," said Kane.
    ....
    https://www.unexplained-mysteries.co...itable-planets

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    The Lost Languages Discovered in One of the World’s Oldest Continuously Run Libraries

    Centuries-old texts were erased, and then written over, by monks at Saint Catherine’s Monastery in Egypt.

    ....
    Saint Catherine’s Monastery, a sacred Christian site nestled in the shadow of Mount Sinai, is home to one of the world’s oldest continuously used libraries. Thousands of manuscripts and books are kept there—some of which contain hidden treasures.

    Now, as Jeff Farrell reports for the Independent, a team of researchers is using new technology to uncover texts that were erased and written over by the monks who lived and worked at the monastery. Many of these original texts were written in languages well known to researchers—Latin, Greek, Arabic—but others were inscribed in long-lost languages that are rarely seen in the historical record.

    Manuscripts with multiple layers of writing are known as palimpsests, and there are about 130 of them at St. Catherine’s Monastery, according to the website of the Early Manuscript Electronic Library, which has been leading the initiative to uncover the original texts. As Richard Gray explains in the Atlantic, with the rise of Islam in the 7th century, Christian sites in the Sinai Desert began to disappear, and Saint Catherine’s found itself in relative isolation. Monks turned to reusing older parchments when supplies at the monastery ran scarce.

    To uncover the palimpsests’ secret texts, researchers photographed thousands of pages multiple times, illuminating each page with different-colored lights. They also photographed the pages with light shining onto them from behind, or from an oblique angle, which helped “highlight tiny bumps and depressions in the surface,” Gray writes. They then fed the information into a computer algorithm, which is able to distinguish the more recent texts from the originals.
    ....
    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/l...=pocket-newtab

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    And another ....
    The Case for Making Low-Tech ‘Dumb’ Cities Instead of ‘Smart’ Ones

    High-tech smart cities promise efficiency by monitoring everything from bins to bridges. But what if we ditched the data and embraced ancient technology instead?

    ....
    Ever since smartphones hooked us with their limitless possibilities and dopamine hits, mayors and city bureaucrats can’t get enough of the notion of smart-washing their cities. It makes them sound dynamic and attractive to business. What’s not to love about whizzkids streamlining your responsibilities for running services, optimising efficiency and keeping citizens safe into a bunch of fun apps?

    There’s no concrete definition of a smart city, but high-tech versions promise to use cameras and sensors to monitor everyone and everything, from bins to bridges, and use the resulting data to help the city run smoothly. One high-profile proposal by Google’s sister company, Sidewalk Labs, to give 12 acres of Toronto a smart makeover is facing a massive backlash. In September 2019, an independent report called the plans “frustratingly abstract”; in turn US tech investor Roger McNamee warned Google can’t be trusted with such data, calling the project “surveillance capitalism”.

    There are practical considerations, too, as Shoshanna Saxe of the University of Toronto has highlighted. Smart cities, she wrote in the New York Times in 2019, “will be exceedingly complex to manage, with all sorts of unpredictable vulnerabilities”. Tech products age fast: what happens when the sensors fail? And can cities afford expensive new teams of tech staff, as well as keeping the ground workers they’ll still need? “If smart data identifies a road that needs paving,” she writes, “it still needs people to show up with asphalt and a steamroller.”

    Saxe pithily calls for redirecting some of our energy toward building “excellent dumb cities.” She’s not anti-technology, it’s just that she thinks smart cities may be unnecessary. “For many of our challenges, we don’t need new technologies or new ideas; we need the will, foresight and courage to use the best of the old ideas,” she says.

    Saxe is right. In fact, she could go further. There’s old, and then there’s old – and for urban landscapes increasingly vulnerable to floods, adverse weather, carbon overload, choking pollution and an unhealthy disconnect between humans and nature, there’s a strong case for looking beyond old technologies to ancient technologies.
    ....
    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/t...=pocket-newtab

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Another temporary hold/archive;
    The Headquarters of Neo-Marxism

    Samuel Freeman

    March 23, 2017 Issue

    Marx argued that economic systems have always involved the exploitation of workers for the benefit of a privileged class that owns and controls “the means of production.” As a result, according to Marx, workers are “alienated” from their labor, from the products they make, from other people, and ultimately from their own humanity since their lives and labor are determined not by themselves but by the demands of a privileged class and impersonal market forces.

    Workers tolerate this apparent injustice, Marx explains, because exploitation is hidden from everyone’s view by a complex web of illusions he calls “ideology.” Significant obfuscations under capitalism include a wage contract that allegedly gives workers the fair value of their labor, as well as “ideological nonsense about right” such as “free and fair exchange,” “fair distribution,” and the claim that capitalists make a contribution on a par with labor. These and other illusions, along with religion and the state, all sustain capitalism as a system of exploitation and alienation.

    Marx’s account of ideology or “false consciousness” is his most enduring legacy in the West. It provides the intellectual foundations for the work of the Marxists who founded the Frankfurt School in the 1920s and continued developing it until the 1970s. They provided the basis for what is called “critical theory,” which, drawing on Marxist and Freudian ideas, emphasizes the underlying, often hidden forces that determine the shape of culture. The three books reviewed here survey the lives and ideas of the most famous members of the Frankfurt School.

    The Institute for Social Research, known as the Frankfurt School, opened in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1924 as a neo-Marxist institute devoted to examining and criticizing contemporary capitalist society. It was endowed by the world’s largest grain trader, Hermann Weil; his son Felix asked him to fund a multidisciplinary academic institute that would explain why the Communist revolution had failed in Germany and how it might succeed in the future. From 1930 to 1958, the philosopher Max Horkheimer was director of the institute. His tenure included the Frankfurt School’s period of exile in the United States from 1934, after the Nazis took power, until the early 1950s.

    The leading thinkers of the Frankfurt School were Horkheimer, the philosophers Theodor Adorno and Herbert Marcuse, and the psychoanalyst Erich Fromm.1 The literary critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin, though not officially a member of the institute, was closely associated with it and strongly influenced its thinking. All of these figures, except Fromm, were the children of successful Jewish businessmen. Like Felix Weil, they rejected their capitalist fathers’ material success while simultaneously benefiting from it.
    ....
    [Rest of article is exclusive content for subscribers only, but this provides a jist]
    https://www.nybooks.com/articles/201...s-neo-marxism/

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    As a usual holding place/archive, going into this thread for now;

    Can Science Explain Religion?

    Robert Wright’s “The Evolution of God” both surveys the history of religion and offers a new theory to explain why this history unfolded as it did.

    ....
    One


    Robert Wright is not afraid to think big thoughts. Wright, who contributes regularly to a host of magazines including Slate and Time and who edits the Web site Bloggingheads.tv, has written several intellectually ambitious books. In TheMoral Animal (1997), for example, he considered the young (and controversial) science of evolutionary psychology. And in Nonzero (2001), he offered a heady tour of human history and argued that ideas from the mathematical field of game theory reveal how much of that history was driven by the mutual benefits that accrue from human cooperation. In his latest book, Wright takes on an even grander subject: religion. In The Evolution of God, he both surveys the history of religion and, more important, offers a new theory to explain why this history unfolded as it did.

    According to Wright’s theory, although religion may seem otherworldly—a realm of revelation and spirituality—its history has, like that of much else, been driven by mundane “facts on the ground.” Religion, that is, changes through time primarily because it responds to changing circumstances in the real world: economics, politics, and war. Wright thus offers what he emphasizes is a materialist account of religion. As he further emphasizes, the ways in which religion responds to the world make sense. Like organisms, religions respond adaptively to the world.

    More formally, Wright argues that religious responses to reality are generally explained by game theory and evolutionary psychology, the subjects of his previous books. Subtle aspects of the human mind, he claims, were shaped by Darwinian natural selection to allow us to recognize and take advantage of certain social situations. The most important of these—and the centerpiece of Wright’s theory—are what game theorists call non-zero-sum interactions. Unlike zero-sum games, wherein one player’s gain is another player’s loss, in some games both players can win; hence “non-zero-sum.” The classic example is economic trade. In a free market, trade occurs when both parties benefit from exchange (otherwise they wouldn’t engage in it).

    As technologies, particularly transportation, improved throughout history, cultures collided and human beings encountered more and more of these non-zero-sum opportunities. Religion, Wright says, responded rationally to these encounters. For example, religious doctrine grew more tolerant of other faiths when tolerance helped smooth economic or political interactions that were potentially win-win: it’s wise to respect the other fellow’s gods when you want to trade or form military alliances with him. (Wright suggests that these responses were often unconscious, not cynical.) One consequence of the growing number of non-zero-sum interactions was that, through time, the “moral circle” expanded. While primitive man tended to view only his clan or tribe as fully human and so worthy of moral consideration, the ties forged among peoples via their cooperative interactions encouraged them to expand the moral circle from tribe, to ethnic group, to nation, and ultimately to all human beings.
    ....
    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/c...=pocket-newtab

    This post originally appeared on The New York Review of Books and was published January 13, 2010. This article is republished here with permission.

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  • G David Bock
    replied
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
    In the case of Venus, the lack of rotation ensures that one side of the planet cooks and creates a convection current with the cold side. Faster rotation in either direction would ensure a more even heating of the planet and a greater chance it would have some cooling effect as well. The lack of a moon again would be an issue as it would allow some instability in rotational axis.
    Actually Venus does rotate, but it takes about and orbit and half for one "day" to occur. And while the other planets and most of their moons rotate in counter-clockwise motion, looking down from the "North Star", Venus rotates in a clockwise direction. Biggest challenge with Venus might be this:
    ...
    Roughly two-thirds of the Venusian surface is covered by flat, smooth plains that are marred by thousands of volcanoes, some of which are still active today, ranging from about 0.5 to 150 miles (0.8 to 240 kilometers) wide, with lava flows carving long, winding canals that are up to more than 3,000 miles (5,000 km) in length — longer than on any other planet.
    ....
    https://www.space.com/44-venus-secon...ar-system.html

    Meanwhile, having a large moon nearly the size of a planet and close in size to it's parent planet seems a bit of a novelty, in our solar system anyway. That and a couple of other items covered in this thread;
    Earth is not the Metric ...

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  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    In the case of Venus, the lack of rotation ensures that one side of the planet cooks and creates a convection current with the cold side. Faster rotation in either direction would ensure a more even heating of the planet and a greater chance it would have some cooling effect as well. The lack of a moon again would be an issue as it would allow some instability in rotational axis.

    Leave a comment:

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