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  • Big Gods Came After the Rise of Civilizations, Not Before, Finds Study Using Huge Historical Database

    God only started watching over us quite recently, according to a study that analyzed 414 societies from 30 world regions.

    ..........
    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/b...=pocket-newtab
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
    Present Current Events are the Future's History

    Comment


    • Here for now, though another sub-forum/thread may apply later;

      The last of the Zoroastrians
      A funeral, a family, and a journey into a disappearing religion.
      By Shaun Walker
      ........
      In the days after the funeral, it struck me with some sadness that my grandfather, who had spent almost a century devoted to the Zoroastrian faith, would be the final Parsi in his family line. Growing up in Britain, I’d read a bit about the history of Zoroastrianism, but only knew the basics: it was one of the oldest religions, based on the teachings of the prophet Zarathustra, who lived thousands of years ago, though nobody knew exactly where or when (Iran, central Asia, perhaps what is now southern Russia; and about 1500 BC, give or take a few centuries). The faith he preached, of an epic battle between a powerful deity and an evil spirit, in which his followers should do everything in thoughts, words and deeds to aid the side of light, was passed down orally for centuries before it was committed to parchment. It became the dominant religion of Persia for more than a millennium, until the advent of Islam in the seventh century. Some Zoroastrians who refused to convert fled, and ended up in Gujarat in western India, where they became known as Parsis after their Persian origins. They built new temples to house their sacred fires, which were tended to by priests and could never be extinguished.

      The Parsis promised their Hindu hosts they would not proselytise, and over the centuries this morphed into a dogmatic aversion to conversion. The rigorous tribalism kept the small community alive and distinct for more than a millennium, but in today’s world, the same intransigence is killing it off. “You’ve seen four weddings and a funeral – well, for Parsis, it’s four funerals and a wedding,” says Jehangir Patel, who has edited the community’s monthly magazine, Parsiana, for almost 50 years. When he finally retires, he fears the magazine will simply close, as more of its readers are dying off each year. India’s Parsi population shrank from 114,000 in 1941 to 57,000 at the last census in 2011. Projections suggest that by the end of the century, there will be just 9,000 left.
      ....
      The following morning, in a lecture at Mistree’s apartment, he laid out the basic tenets of Zoroastrianism. I was impressed with its answer to the agnostic’s most vexing question: why, if there is an almighty God, is there so much suffering on earth? The Zoroastrian God, Ahura Mazda, is locked in a permanent battle with Ahriman, an evil spirit. Ahura Mazda is omniscient but not omnipotent, meaning that famine, disease, killings and other evils are not the work of a jealous and vengeful God, but are instead the temporary triumph of Ahriman. Early Zoroastrianism had a great influence on other major religions, and some scholars believe that Jewish eschatology grew out of Zoroastrian thinking. The three wise men of the nativity story are thought to have been Zoroastrian priests.

      Mistree moved on to the holy fires, which are central to Zoroastrian worship. Creating the “highest grade” of fire requires the merging of 16 separate fires, he told us, including fire from a lightning strike and fire from the house of a king. The resultant super-fire takes 14,000 hours of prayer to consecrate, and can subsequently only be fed with sandalwood. “I was in England when Coventry cathedral was consecrated and the ceremony was only six to eight hours,” he said, pausing for us to savour the comparison. Mistree also spoke of the importance of the sudreh and kusti, an undershirt and belt tied ceremonially while praying, which had to be worn for any visit to a temple. Mistree insisted that to be a “real” Zoroastrian, a person had to wear their sudreh and kusti every day. Because I hadn’t had a navjote – the Zoroastrian coming of age ceremony – I was not eligible to wear them, and thus not permitted to enter any fire temples. (Since a still-contested reform a century ago, children of mixed marriages in which the father is the Parsi can have a navjote and join the fold, but if the mother marries out, it’s game over.)

      Beneath the zealous adherence to ritual was a basic theology that seemed both simple and admirable. Zoroastrianism does not prize concepts such as guilt, martyrdom or asceticism. There is, instead, an obligation to work hard, make money, enjoy the proceeds and give generously. “Fasting is a sin. Being unproductive is a sin,” said Mistree. “To be spiritual you have to purposefully generate wealth, do it honestly and then share it.”

      The exhortation to make money perhaps helps explain why many Parsis have been so successful in the world of business. My grandfather would speak about the work of lawyers and accountants with a note of wonder in his voice that some might reserve for spectacular works of art. “He is good with money” was perhaps his ultimate compliment. The most famous of the historical Parsi entrepreneurs was Jamsetji Tata, who was born into a poor family of Parsi priests in Gujarat in 1839, made his first money in the opium trade, and eventually became one of the 19th century’s most prominent industrialists and philanthropists. His holdings went on to become Tata Group, which today is one of the world’s largest companies.
      .....
      Dastoor told me that nowhere in the Zoroastrian texts does it say children from mixed families should not be allowed to be Zoroastrians. When I asked him about Mistree’s assertion that people like my grandfather who chose to be cremated would go to hell, he became irate. “This is where we’ve gone wrong as a religion,” he said. He told me that while he would personally prefer to be consigned to a dakhma, adherence to ritual and dogma was a secondary concern: “The improvement of your soul, ideas, the kindness you show to people, to help educate and show charity to your family, your whole community and all of society – this is how we should measure a good Zoroastrian.”
      ....
      https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...=pocket-newtab




      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
      “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
      Present Current Events are the Future's History

      Comment


      • Invisible Manipulators of Your Mind

        The behavioral techniques that are being employed by governments and private corporations do not appeal to our reason.
        .....
        One

        We are living in an age in which the behavioral sciences have become inescapable. The findings of social psychology and behavioral economics are being employed to determine the news we read, the products we buy, the cultural and intellectual spheres we inhabit, and the human networks, online and in real life, of which we are a part. Aspects of human societies that were formerly guided by habit and tradition, or spontaneity and whim, are now increasingly the intended or unintended consequences of decisions made on the basis of scientific theories of the human mind and human well-being.

        The behavioral techniques that are being employed by governments and private corporations do not appeal to our reason; they do not seek to persuade us consciously with information and argument. Rather, these techniques change behavior by appealing to our nonrational motivations, our emotional triggers and unconscious biases. If psychologists could possess a systematic understanding of these nonrational motivations they would have the power to influence the smallest aspects of our lives and the largest aspects of our societies.
        ....
        https://getpocket.com/explore/item/i...=pocket-newtab
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
        “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
        Present Current Events are the Future's History

        Comment


        • Backup archiving:
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          Do Humans Really have a Killer Instinct, or is that just Manly Fancy?
          .....
          Horrified by the atrocities of the 20th century, an array of scientists sought to explain why human beings turned to violence. The founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud argued that ‘man is a wolf to man’, driven to hatred, destruction and death. The neuroscientist Paul MacLean maintained that humans’ violent tendencies could be traced to their primitive ‘reptilian brain’. The social psychologist Albert Bandura countered that aggression was not inborn but resulted from imitation and suggestion. Despite the controversy they provoked, such theories often attained the status of conventional wisdom.

          What makes claims about human nature become truisms? How do they gain credibility? They might rely on experiments, case studies or observation, but evidence alone is never enough to persuade. Such theories – by virtue of the very fact that they seek to encompass the human – must always go beyond their evidence. They manage to persuade by appealing to common experience and explaining familiar events, by creating a shock of recognition in their audiences, a sudden realisation that ‘this must be true’. They employ characters and a narrative arc, and draw moral lessons. In short: they tell a good story.

          In the 1960s, alongside prevailing psychological and neuroscientific theories of human aggression, a new claim appeared, that aggression was a human instinct. Relying on the sciences of evolution and animal behaviour, this ‘instinct theory’ held that human aggression was a legacy of our deep ancestral past and an inbuilt tendency shared with many other animal species. One important novelty of this theory was its assertion that human aggression was not wholly destructive, but had a positive, even constructive side. Its proponents were talented writers who readily adopted literary devices.
          ....
          Thanks to Ardrey’s embroidered telling, Dart’s theory inspired perhaps the most famous scene in cinematic history. In the opening sequence of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), the leader of a band of ape-men smashes the remains of his defeated antagonists with a crude weapon fashioned out of bone. The victors are carnivorous and armed; the losers, gentle and defenceless. At the end of the sequence, the leader tosses his bone weapon into the air, where it is transformed into a spaceship gliding silently through darkness. Arthur C Clarke, the scriptwriter for Stanley Kubrick’s film, had read Ardrey’s book, and the scene echoed Dart’s claim: human ingenuity begins in violence.
          ....
          By the 1960s, Lorenz had begun to notice a curious feature of the aggression that his animals directed at members of their own species. Unlike predator-prey relationships, these intraspecies encounters rarely ended in killing. Instead, the aggressor animals diverted their violent impulses into harmless or even productive channels. Two rival greylag ganders, spoiling for a fight, cackled and threatened each other, but never physically clashed. Their aggression thus discharged in these playacting rituals, each gander returned to his mate in triumph. Lorenz observed that not only was outright violence avoided, but the social bond between each gander and his own family was actually strengthened. Far from a drive purely toward destruction and death, aggression redirected against an outsider engendered the ties of affection and love among the in-group.

          Lorenz’s ethology showed that aggression, when properly managed, had positive consequences. Ardrey realised that the answer to the problem of human aggression was not to try to eliminate it – an impossible task, since Dart had demonstrated that it was ingrained in our nature – but to acknowledge aggression as innate and ineradicable, and then channel it productively. In his book On Aggression (1966), Lorenz made his own suggestions for possible outlets, including the space race.
          ....
          How did the killer-instinct idea achieve such cultural power? Because it came embedded in story. Like the greatest fictional works, Lorenz’s and Ardrey’s books drew on an ancient motif: that man’s fatal flaw was also his greatest strength, deprived of which he would cease to be human. Their deft use of character, plot and scene-setting, their invocation of myth, their summing up in a moral that readers could apply to themselves, drove the theories of Lorenz and Ardrey to conventional wisdom status.

          The sciences on which they built their theories might have been superseded. But today’s sciences of human nature – sociobiology and evolutionary psychology – have adopted the claim for an evolved predisposition for aggression. The 1960s bestsellers ushered in a genre of popular science that still depends on speculative reconstructions of human prehistory. It also still draws comparisons between the behaviour and emotions of humans and animals. The grudging compliment we pay a powerful man – ‘he’s an alpha male’ – is one hint of the genre. But we ought to be careful about what we believe. Theories of human nature have important consequences – what we think we are shapes how we act. We believe in such theories not because they are true, but because we are persuaded that they are true. The history of the claim for a killer instinct in humans encourages us to think of the ways in which scientists argue and try to persuade. Storytelling, in this view, is a crucial element of both the science and its public presentation.
          ....
          https://psyche.co/ideas/do-humans-re...=pocket-newtab

          Highlight in red is my doing, secondary sifting of main content.
          Obviously, I encourage read the full article. I also think there is some validity to the concept, but could be expanded to "competition" as a more encompassing driver to human ingenuity since this includes areas such as economics, trade, technology which don't always result in direct violence.
          Last edited by G David Bock; 17 Aug 20, 12:21.
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
          “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
          Present Current Events are the Future's History

          Comment


          • DITTO:
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

            Human Evolution Is Still Happening – Possibly Faster Than Ever

            Natural selection isn’t the only factor deciding human evolution.

            ....
            Modern medicine’s ability to keep us alive makes it tempting to think human evolution may have stopped. Better healthcare disrupts a key driving force of evolution by keeping some people alive longer, making them more likely to pass on their genes. But if we look at the rate of our DNA’s evolution, we can see that human evolution hasn’t stopped – it may even be happening faster than before.

            Evolution is a gradual change to the DNA of a species over many generations. It can occur by natural selection, when certain traits created by genetic mutations help an organism survive or reproduce. Such mutations are thus more likely to be passed on to the next generation, so they increase in frequency in a population. Gradually, these mutations and their associated traits become more common among the whole group.

            By looking at global studies of our DNA, we can see evidence that natural selection has recently made changes and continues to do so. Though modern healthcare frees us from many causes of death, in countries without access to good healthcare, populations are continuing to evolve. Survivors of infectious disease outbreaks drive natural selection by giving their genetic resistance to offspring. Our DNA shows evidence for recent selection for resistance of killer diseases like Lassa fever and malaria. Selection in response to malaria is still ongoing in regions where the disease remains common.

            Humans are also adapting to their environment. Mutations allowing humans to live at high altitudes have become more common in populations in Tibet, Ethiopia, and the Andes. The spread of genetic mutations in Tibet is possibly the fastest evolutionary change in humans, occurring over the last 3,000 years. This rapid surge in frequency of a mutated gene that increases blood oxygen content gives locals a survival advantage in higher altitudes, resulting in more surviving children.
            ....
            Diet is another source for adaptations. Evidence from Inuit DNA shows a recent adaptation that allows them to thrive on their fat-rich diet of Arctic mammals. Studies also show that natural selection favouring a mutation allowing adults to produce lactase – the enzyme that breaks down milk sugars – is why some groups of people can digest milk after weaning. Over 80 percent of north-west Europeans can, but in parts of East Asia, where milk is much less commonly drunk, an inability to digest lactose is the norm. Like high altitude adaptation, selection to digest milk has evolved more than once in humans and may be the strongest kind of recent selection.
            ....
            Yet, despite these changes, natural selection only affects about 8 percent of our genome. ...
            .....
            But neutral evolution can’t explain why some genes are evolving much faster than others. We measure the speed of gene evolution by comparing human DNA with that of other species, which also allows us to determine which genes are fast-evolving in humans alone. One fast-evolving gene is human accelerated region 1 (HAR1), which is needed during brain development. A random section of human DNA is on average more than 98 percent identical to the chimp comparator, but HAR1 is so fast evolving that it’s only around 85 percent similar.
            ....
            DNA molecules are made with four different chemical bases known as C, G, A and T. The repair process prefers to make fixes using C and G bases rather than A or T. While unclear why this bias exists, it tends to cause G and C to become more common.

            Increases in G and C at DNA’s regular repair sites causes ultrafast evolution of parts of our genome, a process easily mistaken for natural selection, since both cause rapid DNA change at highly localised sites. About a fifth of our fastest evolving genes, including HAR1, have been affected by this process. If the GC changes are harmful, natural selection would normally oppose them. But with selection weakened, this process could largely go unchecked and could even help speed up our DNA’s evolution.

            The human mutation rate itself may also be changing. The main source of mutations in human DNA is the cell division process that creates sperm cells. The older males get, the more mutations occur in their sperm. ...
            ....
            https://getpocket.com/explore/item/h...=pocket-newtab
            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
            “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
            Present Current Events are the Future's History

            Comment


            • How Cheese, Wheat and Alcohol Shaped Human Evolution

              Over time, diet causes dramatic changes to our anatomy, immune systems, and maybe even skin color.
              ....
              You aren’t what you eat, exactly. But over many generations, what we eat does shape our evolutionary path. “Diet,” says anthropologist John Hawks, of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, “has been a fundamental story throughout our evolutionary history. Over the last million years there have been changes in human anatomy, teeth and the skull, that we think are probably related to changes in diet.”

              As our evolution continues, the crucial role of diet hasn’t gone away. Genetic studies show that humans are still evolving, with evidence of natural selection pressures on genes impacting everything from Alzheimer's disease to skin color to menstruation age. And what we eat today will influence the direction we will take tomorrow.
              ....
              Ancient DNA shows how recent this adult lactose tolerance is, in evolutionary terms. Twenty-thousand years ago, it was non-existent. As of 2018, about one-third of all adults have tolerance. ...
              .....
              Wheat, Starch and Alcohol

              These days, it isn’t uncommon to find an entire grocery store aisle devoted to gluten-free cookies, bread and crackers. Yet trouble digesting gluten—the main protein found in wheat—is another relatively recent snag in human evolution. Humans didn't start storing and eating grains regularly until around 20,000 years ago, and wheat domestication didn't begin in earnest until about 10,000 years ago.

              Since wheat and rye became a staple of human diets, however, we've have had a relatively high frequency of celiac disease. “You look at this and say how did it happen?” asks Hawks. “That's something that natural selection shouldn't have done.”

              The answer lies in our immune response. A system of genes known as the human leukocyte antigens take part in the fight against disease, and frequently produce new variations to battle ever-changing infections. Unfortunately, for individuals with celiac disease, this system mistakes the human digestive system for a disease and attacks the lining of the gut.
              .....
              More than one-third of East Asians—Japanese, Chinese and Koreans—have a flushing reaction when they metabolize alcohol, because the process creates an excess of toxic acetaldehyde enzymes. There's strong genetic evidence that this was selected recently, during the last 20,000 years, Hawks notes.

              Because its appearance in the genome may roughly coincide with rice domestication 10,000 years ago, some researchers suggest that it stopped people from over indulging in rice wine. The timelines aren't precisely determined, however, for either the mutation or rice domestication. It has also been suggested that acetaldehyde offered protection from parasites that were unable to stomach the toxin.
              ....
              https://getpocket.com/explore/item/h...uman-evolution
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
              “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
              Present Current Events are the Future's History

              Comment


              • Well, we can also look at close relatives. Chimpanzees share dna (97%). Jane Goodall did years of research on them and saw all kinds of violent behaviors. Males are territorial and will kill rivals. They also eat meat they have hunted. Jane never left her young son alone with Chimps. Chimps even would eat each other (something else they share with humans).

                Pruitt
                Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
                  Well, we can also look at close relatives. Chimpanzees share dna (97%). Jane Goodall did years of research on them and saw all kinds of violent behaviors. Males are territorial and will kill rivals. They also eat meat they have hunted. Jane never left her young son alone with Chimps. Chimps even would eat each other (something else they share with humans).

                  Pruitt
                  Good point, but may apply more when humans are in a more primitive cultural condition/state.

                  It seems that as humans become more civilized,: agriculture, communities, culture, government, etc. frequency of species-cide decline. However, when it does occur, it can be large in volume of application, such as wars.
                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                  “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                  Present Current Events are the Future's History

                  Comment


                  • People With Creative Personalities Really Do See the World Differently

                    Not only do open people bring a different perspective, but they genuinely see things differently than most.

                    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/p...=pocket-newtab

                    What if We Could Live for a Million Years?


                    Vastly extended life spans would bring dazzling opportunitiesand daunting risks
                    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...=pocket-newtab
                    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                    Present Current Events are the Future's History

                    Comment


                    • I would say if we did live for a million years, and our daily existence was similar to what it is now, the following are distinct possibilities:

                      We would become individually self-sufficient. That is, we would have a quality shelter (home), have sufficient food and other basic needs met and in general have gotten comfortable with our life and lifestyle

                      We would stop being highly inventive and competitive (assumes a stable population size and not rampant growth). Why toil hard towards making things better when you are already comfortable the way things are?

                      Now, if population growth were rampant or significant, then competition for resources would lead to inventing means to get off this rock and populate other rocks. A lifespan that long makes it perfectly viable to build a colony ship to go to other solar systems. Spending a couple of years to get to Mars would be nothing.

                      A couple of variants to ponder:

                      The Earth is 100% cloud covered at say 15,000 to 25,000 feet (give or take) 100% of the time. We never see the stars prior to the invention of flight, never see the sun except as a blur through the clouds. Possibly only rarely, if ever, see the Moon. For us, the sky is a white to grey color. How would our knowledge of the universe be changed?

                      Or, Mars is larger, has a larger captive moon, and a magnetic field? Or, Venus is a bit further from the Sun and has more rotation giving it a more Earth-like surface and atmosphere?





                      Comment


                      • The Secret History of Marxist Alien Hunters

                        The branch of UFO investigation they don’t want you to know about.

                        https://getpocket.com/explore/item/t...=pocket-newtab
                        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                        “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                        Present Current Events are the Future's History

                        Comment



                        • Date Saturday - August 22 2020Host Richard Syrett
                          Guests Lyle Blackburn, Justen Faull, Wes Faull

                          Filmmakers Wes and Justen Faull joined Richard Syrett (Twitter) to discuss the director's cut of their documentary, Belly of the Beast, which explores the hidden history and occult origins of the United States, and how America may be set to fulfill an ancient prophecy. The brothers spoke about the Babylon system — the first one-world order/religion comprised of practices involving many gods. "All the secret societies that we are aware of today... they are practitioners of ancient rituals and rites, and all of those religious rites go back to Babylon, Wes explained. These were religions passed down from the fallen angels, he added.

                          The ancient religions of the fallen angels have continued over the centuries through secret societies, the two continued. Freemasons claim to have access to the original language and rites that date back to Babylon, Justen revealed. They detailed a veiled references to America in the writings of Plato which suggested the new nation would bring the world under one order. According to the Faulls, fallen angels were put over the nations and Lucifer himself is over the United States. "This system [of constitution government] that was created here was not created by Christians," Justen explained, noting the Founding Fathers did not believe in the God of the Bible.
                          .....
                          fourthwatchfilms.com

                          https://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2020-08-22-show/

                          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                          “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                          Present Current Events are the Future's History

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                            I would say if we did live for a million years, and our daily existence was similar to what it is now, the following are distinct possibilities:

                            We would become individually self-sufficient. That is, we would have a quality shelter (home), have sufficient food and other basic needs met and in general have gotten comfortable with our life and lifestyle

                            We would stop being highly inventive and competitive (assumes a stable population size and not rampant growth). Why toil hard towards making things better when you are already comfortable the way things are?

                            Now, if population growth were rampant or significant, then competition for resources would lead to inventing means to get off this rock and populate other rocks. A lifespan that long makes it perfectly viable to build a colony ship to go to other solar systems. Spending a couple of years to get to Mars would be nothing.

                            A couple of variants to ponder:

                            The Earth is 100% cloud covered at say 15,000 to 25,000 feet (give or take) 100% of the time. We never see the stars prior to the invention of flight, never see the sun except as a blur through the clouds. Possibly only rarely, if ever, see the Moon. For us, the sky is a white to grey color. How would our knowledge of the universe be changed?

                            Or, Mars is larger, has a larger captive moon, and a magnetic field? Or, Venus is a bit further from the Sun and has more rotation giving it a more Earth-like surface and atmosphere?
                            One challenge on lifespans of a million years is how much the Earth changes over that range of time. Continents have moved significantly, there have been a few glaciations=ice ages, etc.

                            The variant of cloud cover is an interesting one to consider. Would depend upon composition, and some different atmospheric dynamics. If normal clouds, would have to be several times more water vapor in the atmosphere, and likely we'd have a much warmer temp at ground/sea level. There's also the issue how well would photosynthesis work. And other items come to mind.

                            If Mars was larger, and/or had more mass, it might have retained an atmosphere longer, and maybe average planetary temps to allow for liquid water. Some speculate it may been such in the past. It would diffidently offer a second world more hospitable to colonize.

                            Venus is more problematic. The rotation would also have to change direction since currently it is retrograde. The heat and clouded current conditions are most likely the result of a past close encounter with a large planet like body or maybe a major collision. Something ~ somehow, the full mass of the planet was tipped over about 180 degrees and yet retained initial spin, which is slowed down and gives the retrograde from having axis flipped. Energy involved was likely very intense and disruptive to the planet's surface, hence it's very high temps, thick (debris) cloud cover, and surface disruptions and volcanisms, etc.

                            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                            “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                            Present Current Events are the Future's History

                            Comment


                            • A couple more "weirdness" topics that fit within the scope of this thread;
                              ....

                              Date Tuesday - August 25 2020Host George Noory
                              Guests Paul LeMay, Jason Shurka

                              ....
                              In the first half of the program, science writer Paul LeMay presented his latest work on cosmic waves from the sun, which are elevating the Schumann resonance to all time measured highs and, in turn, allowing human physiology to achieve pops of enlightened states of consciousness without meditation and spiritual practice. He explained that the sun emits radiation which interacts with the Earth's atmosphere to create lightning and, in turn, this discharged energy spawns a global electromagnetic frequency known as the 'Schumann resonance.' Remarkably, he noted that this radiation has increased by 18% over the last five years and scientists predict that it will "climb up to 75 percent."

                              The expected rise in radiation, LeMay said, will result in a tremendous increase in the Schumann resonance frequency. He postulated that this should have a profound impact on human physiology as the human brain will then synch with the higher frequency by way of a process known as entrainment. "As the Schumann resonance climbs," he marveled, "our brain and our mind is being pulled up to these higher levels of vibration even though we're not familiar with them." Ultimately, LeMay posited, this may result in the average layperson developing "a range of mental function that usually only available to monks who have been meditating for many years."
                              ----------------------------------

                              In the latter half, Jason Shurka discussed his contact with a clandestine spiritual organization that he says has secretly existed on this planet for millennia. "This is the first time in history," he declared, "that they have given permission to speak about them publicly." The group, Shurka revealed, is known as 'The Light System' (TLS) and consists of "roughly 7,000 initiated agents," including a number of well-known individuals from the worlds of politics, the media, and entertainment. Although he has not been told who created the organization nor when, he said that the purpose of the group was to elevate the spirituality of humanity in order to bring about an "age of love."

                              According to Shurka, his liaison who belongs to the TLS and chose him as a messenger for the group gave him a document titled 'The Pyramid Code' which explained how the iconic structures in Egypt were constructed in 2750 BC by four races of beings that came to the Earth as both a means of escaping their home worlds as well as with a mission to elevate the human race. Beneath the pyramids, he claimed, were hidden various advanced technological instruments, spaceships that these entities used to arrive on our planet, and written records that detail the incredible story which he has been told. At some point in the future, when humanity is prepared to receive such knowledge, Shurka said, we will be given a literal code which will unlock the true secrets of the pyramids.
                              ....
                              https://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2020-08-25-show/
                              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                              “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                              Present Current Events are the Future's History

                              Comment


                              • In Mar's case, even as it is, the reason it can't retain an atmosphere is that the solar wind strips it off the planet as it forms. If Mars had a magnetic field, like the Earth, it would have an atmosphere and likely still retain water on the surface.

                                https://www.scienceabc.com/nature/un...20same%20time.

                                https://arstechnica.com/science/2015...old-dry-world/

                                So, if it were larger and particularly had a larger moon circling it, Mars would have the requisite magnetic field and have both a thicker atmosphere and free standing water on the surface.

                                Comment

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