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  • Just for a quicker find, a replay ...

    Moon with a View:
    Or, What Did Arthur Know … and When Did He Know it?

    http://www.enterprisemission.com/moon1.htm

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    • Multiple lines of mysterious ancient humans interbred with us

      Modern DNA suggests that the Denisovans were surprisingly diverse—and may have been the last humans other than Homo sapiens on Earth.

      ...
      https://www.nationalgeographic.com/s...-neanderthals/

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      • A conventional view ...

        What Creation Myth Did the Babylonians Believe?

        https://www.historyhit.com/what-crea...nians-believe/

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        • California scientists unravel genetic mysteries of world’s tallest trees

          https://www.sfchronicle.com/science/...=pocket-newtab

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          • Scientists find way to melt gold at room temperature

            https://newatlas.com/gold-melt-room-temperature/57327/

            Weird new landmarks on Ultima Thule come into focus with sharpest image yet

            https://newatlas.com/clearest-ultima...ndmarks/58210/

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            • Montana man's DNA oldest found on the continent, testing company says
              ...
              Crawford had his DNA tested through CRI Genetics, which aims to provide customers with a "biogeographical ancestry," a description of where their genes fit into the overall story of the species.

              For Crawford, the company traced his line back 55 generations with a 99% accuracy rate. That's rare because the ancestry often is clouded that far back, according to the company.
              ...
              But Crawford's DNA story suggests his ancestors came from the Pacific, traveled to the coast of South America and traveled north, according to CRI. That's a theory anyway.

              He's part of mtDNA Haplogroup B2, which has a low frequency in Alaska and Canada and originated in Arizona about 17,000 years ago.

              That group is one of four major Native American groups that spread across the continent. They're called clans and traced back to four female ancestors, Ai, Ina, Chie and Sachi. Crawford's DNA says he's a descendant of Ina.

              The DNA group’s closest relatives outside the Americas are in Southeast Asia.

              Ina's name comes from a Polynesian mythological figure, a representative of the "first woman." She's riding a shark on a $20 bill in the Cook Islands.

              “Its path from the Americas is somewhat of a mystery as there are no frequencies of the haplogroup in either Alaska or Canada. Today this Native American line is found only in the Americas, with a strong frequency peak on the eastern coast of North America,” according to the DNA testing company.
              ...
              She cited 2017 research from a mastodon site in California that scientists say puts humans in North America at least 100,000 years earlier than previously believed. Previous estimates suggested humans arrived 15,000 years ago.
              ....
              Crawford also had an unusually high percent of Native American ancestry in his results, 83%. Some of that was a mix of Native threads, but, unusually, 73%was from the same heritage.

              Besides his Native heritage, Crawford’s DNA was a remarkable global melting pot. His DNA was 9.8% European, 5.3% East Asian (mostly Japanese and Southern Han Chinese), 2%South Asian (Sri Lankan Tamil, Punjabi, Gujarati Indian and Bengali) and .2% African (Mende in Sierra Leone and African Caribbean).
              ...
              https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...cs/1121352001/

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              • The Mystery of Human Uniqueness

                What, exactly, makes our biology special?
                ...

                Consider, for example, the overall anatomy of the brain. As many people know, the human brain is divided into two hemispheres, left and right. Same for the chimpanzee. How about division into frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes? Yep, chimpanzees have that too. And so, for that matter, do horses, cats, and squirrels. The basic organization of the brain is something we share with all mammals. Could it be that which distinguishes us is the six-layer sheet that defines the wrinkly outer portion of the brain called the neocortex? Nope, chimps (and other mammals) have that too. How about Broca’s area, the part of the brain most associated with language? This, too, has a counterpart in the chimpanzee brain. Meanwhile, the organization of the human brain turns out to be far more complex than many anticipated; almost anything you might have read about brain organization a couple decades ago turns out to be radically oversimplified. Broca’s area, for instance, participates in language, just as everybody imagined, but it’s also used for muscle control, music, and perhaps even imitation. In fact, lots of other parts of the brain, like the prefrontal cortex and even the cerebellum play important roles in language. Language isn’t something that resides in a tiny, well-defined corner of the brain, but something distributed across a great deal of the brain.

                ...

                When we look at our genomes, the situation is no different. Back in the early 1970s, Mary-Claire King discovered that if you compared human and chimpanzee DNA, they were so similar that they must have been nearly identical to begin with. Now that our genomes have actually been sequenced, we know that King, who worked without the benefit of modern genomic equipment, was essentially right. Nearly every gene in the human genome has a counterpart in the chimpanzee genome, and vice versa. Even one look at the individual letters (nucleotides) reveals that our genomes are shockingly similar. Virtually every gene in our genomes—from genes for dopamine and serotonin to genes like BDNF and COMT that contribute to memory control—has a counterpart in the chimpanzee genome. And that’s true even for the gene FOXP2, that has been decisively linked to human language. Of the 715 amino acids that correspond to the part of the FOXP2 gene that codes for a protein, only two differ between human and chimpanzee versions. As of early 2013, we still don’t know which genes are vital to making us differ from chimpanzees. But we do know that genetically we are far more similar than different.
                ...

                http://nautil.us/issue/72/quandary/t...=pocket-newtab


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                • Here partly for the insights regards brain organization;

                  Brain scans reveal a ‘pokémon region’ in adults who played as kids
                  https://www.theverge.com/2019/5/6/18...in-information

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                  • Scientists Think They've Found the Ancient Neutron Star Crash That Showered Our Solar System in Gold

                    ...
                    Two astronomers think they've pinpointed the ancient stellar collision that gave our solar system its cache of precious gold and platinum — some of it, anyway.

                    In a new study published May 1 in the journal Nature, the duo analyzed the remnants of radioactive isotopes, or versions of molecules with different numbers of neutrons, in a very old meteorite. Then, they compared those values with isotope ratios produced by a computer simulation of neutron star mergers — cataclysmic stellar collisions that can cause ripples in the fabric of space-time. [15 Unforgettable Images of Stars]

                    The researchers found that a single neutron star collision, starting about 100 million years before our solar system formed and located 1,000 light-years away, may have provided our cosmic neighborhood many of the elements heavier than iron, which has 26 protons. This includes about 70% of our early solar system's curium atoms and 40% of its plutonium atoms, plus many millions of pounds of precious metals like gold and platinum. In total, this single ancient star crash may have given our solar system 0.3% of all its heavy elements, the researchers found — and we carry some of them around with us every day.
                    ...
                    https://www.livescience.com/65411-ne...ar-system.html

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                    • Like many others before you, your species/culture/world started with explorations, settlings and developments of other usable planets within your star system. Eventually you evolved from Inter-Planetary to Inter-Stellar and began to develop worlds/planets orbiting about stars closest to your home system.

                      As time passed, you went from star systems a few light years away to those that were several light years away; then to those that were tens of light years away, and eventually also reaching out to those scores of light years away.

                      It was then you had learned enough to realize that a large star close to that of your Home World/System(Star) was on verge of exploding as a super-nova and when that event happened, projected to occur within a generation of time, the blast effects, ranging from 50 to as much as 200 light years expanse, would destroy not only your Home World, but also many of the First Worlds your people had settled and developed over the decades(centuries) past.

                      In such events it often seems there are never enough starships, nor enough time to evacuate all your people out of the danger/blast zone; but emergency efforts are made as best you can. Obviously your "best and brightest" of your planetary populations will be evacuated first, but the count-down timeline is such that likely most of those on the worlds within the blast zone will never be able to be evacuated before the Event occurs.

                      "You" do what you can, as best as you can, as quickly as you can; yet still only a small portion of the populations in peril will ever be saved to newer and more distant worlds before the disaster strikes. When the Event happens, only your most distant and barely developed inter-stellar colonies will survive. For the most part, largely cut-off from the former inter-stellar grid and largely on their own, with limited communication among themselves possible, they will now and in most cases individually have to be restarted where your people and culture was decades to centuries ago when first becoming inter-stellar.

                      One of those distant and barely developed colonies that is back to square minus one to restart is that known as Sol-Terra.

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                      • The Weird, Ever-Evolving Story of DNA

                        Carl Zimmer’s sprawling book, She Has Her Mother’s Laugh, forces readers to reconsider what they think they know about genetics and heredity.

                        https://getpocket.com/explore/item/t...=pocket-newtab

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                        • 18 Earth-size planets found in our galaxy—all hiding in plain sight

                          https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/techn...7?ocid=msnbcrd

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                          • ...
                            Researcher Andy Lloyd is known for his 'Dark Star Theory' which considers whether a binary failed star may be orbiting our Sun at a great distance. In the latter half, he talked about the resurgence of interest in Planet X or Nibiru, which has been re-branded by mainstream astronomers as Planet Nine. He was intrigued to discover that astronomers' calculations of the theoretical planet such as its inclined, elongated orbit and large size bear a great deal of similarity to the way Zecharia Sitchin described Nibiru. Potentially located in the heliopause or the beginnings of interstellar space, Lloyd speculated that the planet could be wrapped up in a kind of dusty nebula that obscures direct observation.

                            He also posited that this large object might have a habitable moon in orbit around it, which could contain intelligent life, as Sitchin has written about. Further, there may be something moving between the two objects-- a substantial comet or minor planet, and this could be what shoots into the inner solar system on long-range cycles. It is this "ferry boat" in the sky that might lead to extinction or catastrophic earth events such as the Clovis comet, at the end of the last Ice Age. Lloyd suggested that the ancient Gobekli Tepe site in Turkey could be a post-apocalyptic refuge environment that sought to warn people of the devastating event. For more, view related images Lloyd shared with us.
                            ...
                            https://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2019/06/04
                            http://www.andylloyd.org/
                            http://www.darkstar1.co.uk/

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                            • The WIRED Guide to Aliens
                              https://www.wired.com/story/wired-guide-aliens/
                              Note this site limits the number of "free" articles.

                              It's official - six fingers are better than five
                              https://www.unexplained-mysteries.co...tter-than-five

                              Last edited by G David Bock; 06 Jun 19, 15:34.

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                              • Additional reference ...
                                https://www.innertraditions.com/author/len-kasten/

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