Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why Star Wars should be left to the fans

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • G David Bock
    replied
    pmx030120fealego-002-1583335069.jpg?resize=2048:*.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    I may have to pop this down in the modeling sub-forum, but for now ...


    One Man’s Epic Quest to Build a 20,000-Piece LEGO Star Destroyer

    It’s 44 pounds. It’s five feet long. It's leading a new era of LEGO models.

    ...
    Charles Anderson's Star Destroyer stretches almost 5 feet long, but opposite the enormity is an attention to detail—the filigree of LEGO figurine hands ringing the docking bay; the barnacle-like swath of pipes that make up the vents, pipes, and cannons—that makes the ship an artistic, architectural marvel.

    It took Charles 15 months and more than 500 hours to design and build his LEGO version of the iconic Imperial Star Destroyer, first imprinted on the collective consciousness when it crawled across the opening shot of Star Wars in 1977. Like the ship in the movie, Charles’s destroyer intimidates with its size. Weighing 44 pounds, the creation boasts almost 20,000 LEGO bricks, three times as many as the biggest set LEGO has ever published (the 2017 Star Wars: Millennium Falcon set, priced at $800).

    But it’s not the mass, weight, or obsessive detail that make Charles’s starship so remarkable. “There are definitely bigger and more impressive LEGO Star Destroyers out there,” says Charles, 43, a senior technical animator in Raleigh, North Carolina. “I’ve seen one over 10 feet long.” His construction is distinct because it’s custom, the first such LEGO model he’s built.

    Charles credits his Star Destroyer to a digital revolution transforming LEGO fandom. Throughout LEGO’s 62-year history, die-hards have always built wild, imaginative models from their plastic scrap heaps, but a new wave of fan-made digital resources has given builders the tools to craft custom models that rival the detail and integrity of official LEGO sets. Whether you’re looking for cutting-edge software to design your next project or a site that can generate a piece-by-piece instruction booklet, it’s likely out there, free for download.
    ...
    pmx030120fealego-001-1583334559.jpg?crop=0.943xw:0.707xh;0.0277xw,0.293xh&resize=1600:*.jpg


    ...
    https://www.popularmechanics.com/cul...=pocket-newtab
    (you do have to register with popmech to see the article.)

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    He Was 'Star Wars' ' Secret Weapon, So Why Was He Forgotten?

    ...
    When thousands gathered Dec. 16 in Hollywood for the world premiere of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker — supposedly the last Skywalker film — they heard Bob Iger, Kathleen Kennedy and J.J. Abrams thank everyone from creator George Lucas to the actor who played R2-D2. But one name was not so much as whispered, despite this person's critical 1970s role in launching what would become the most successful movie franchise of all time: the all-but-forgotten Ashley Boone Jr.

    Although his contributions have been mostly lost to history — he doesn't even have a Wikipedia page — Boone, who died in 1994 at age 55, was a marketing and distribution wizard who championed Lucas' space opera when nearly everyone else — including the board of 20th Century Fox — thought it was a wacky idea doomed to fail. He shaped its release date and the number of theaters in which it rolled out and renewed its promotional campaign four times in order to keep it surging in theaters. He worked on a slew of other milestone movies, too, including The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Chariots of Fire, Ghostbusters and Thelma & Louise. Eventually, he became the first black president at a major Hollywood studio — even if that job lasted a grand total of four months — and went on to break many other barriers. And his kid sister left her job as a Pan Am flight attendant to follow him into the business and in 2013 became the first black president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

    "He was a star in every way," Cheryl Boone Isaacs says of her brother, 11 years her senior. "He was the cool, hip guy. Handsome, smart, down-to-earth. He was like Obama."
    ...
    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/fe...=pocket-newtab

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Watch the epic new footage from Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

    ...
    It’s here: The new Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker footage that gives a first look at the climactic showdown between Rey (Daisy Ridley) and Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) along with several other new intriguing shots (above).

    The Episode IX footage is part of a sizzle reel first revealed to fans at the D23 Expo on Saturday in Anaheim, California.

    Images include a duel between Rey and Kylo amid a stormy sea (that might be on the ruins of the Death Star). There’s a massive fleet of Star Destroyers. There’s a new shot of Darth Vader’s helmet. There’s Finn (John Boyega) and a new character named Jannah (Naomi Ackie) together in a cockpit. C-3PO with red eyes. A new glimpse of Leia (the late Carrie Fisher in footage originally shot for The Force Awakens). A gang of heroes approaching a bustling desert city. But the shot that truly stunned the crowd was a scene with Rey in a hooded black robe revealing an unfolding red double-sided lightsaber.
    ...
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/new...x?ocid=msnbcrd

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Star Wars Cast And Crew Tell Their Behind The Scenes Stories Of Carrie Fisher

    https://www.ranker.com/list/star-war...deshow&slide=1

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied





    https://www.ebay.com/i/113425772799?...3D113425772799

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied






    https://www.ebay.com/i/113425772799?...3D113425772799

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied






    https://www.ebay.com/i/113425772799?...3D113425772799
    Last edited by G David Bock; 10 Jul 19, 10:35.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Give the way things vanish on the internet(sometimes) and this being a common appeal of the series of movies and favorite of cosplay, I'm going to present the gallery here in a few posts;







    https://www.ebay.com/i/113425772799?...3D113425772799
    Last edited by G David Bock; 10 Jul 19, 10:34.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied


    The costume may be a bit pricey, but the slide show available on the left is worth the look;
    https://www.ebay.com/i/113425772799?...3D113425772799






    Last edited by G David Bock; 09 Jul 19, 12:24.

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, The Ultimate Preview

    After four decades, Star Wars is drawing to its epic conclusion. Lev Grossman goes behind the scenes with director J.J. Abrams and the cast for the inside scoop on The Rise of Skywalker. With exclusive photographs by Annie Leibovitz.

    ...
    https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood...tab&verso=true

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    As the closest thing to a "generic" Star Wars thread, and since this relates some to SW;

    Inside the coolest office in Hollywood ever

    The production company behind Alias, the Star Trek reboot, and Star Wars Episode IX is a creative playhouse.

    https://www.fastcompany.com/90330369...=pocket-newtab

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    thank the maker this never happened —

    George Lucas reveals his plan for Star Wars 7 through 9—and it was awful

    https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2018/...-it-was-awful/

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    No, 'Star Wars' Isn't Failing Because Of Hateful Trolls. It's Failing Because Kathleen Kennedy Has Done A Garbage Job.

    https://www.dailywire.com/news/31712...aign=position1

    Leave a comment:


  • G David Bock
    replied
    ‘Star Wars’ Plans, Ranked

    Luke Skywalker and Co. always pull it off and prevail in the end, but man, they are not the best strategists in the galaxy

    Solo: A Star Wars Story is kind of a heist movie. (Before you have my head, this isn’t a spoiler; the trailers have made it clear.) It’s like interplanetary Heat—justreplace the Infiniti J30 Al Pacino drives with the Millennium Falcon. As a heist movie, Solo continues the Star Wars franchise’s long-cherished tradition of centering the movies’ final acts on elaborate plans. The Death Star raid in A New Hope, the battle to destroy the new Death Star in Return of the Jedi, the plan hatched by the Resistance to destroy the Death Star–like Starkiller Base in The Force Awakens—you get the picture; there have been a lot of plans, many of which involve battle stations that can destroy planets. Aside from that, the climactic plans in Star Wars movies are defined by two primary characteristics: (1) they are mostly incomprehensible and bordering on nonsensical, and (2) they (mostly) work, whether through the power of the Force or sheer dumb luck. This is a feature, not a bug: These movies are endearing specifically because the little guys prevail against absurd odds when everything appears to be going to ****. It’s David beating Goliath, except David forgot to pack his slingshot on the day of the battle, so he defeated with Goliath with his fists (and maybe a proton torpedo).

    But not all Star Wars plans are equal—some are low-key genius, and some are astonishingly short-sighted. In honor of Solo’s release Friday, let’s revisit all of the plans from the Star Wars films over the years—even the small ones!—to determine which of them were somewhat realistic and/or well executed, and which ones probably could’ve used a second opinion. We’ll start with the least rational plans and work our way up to the “OK, these kinda make sense” ones.
    ...
    https://www.theringer.com/movies/201...uke-death-star

    Leave a comment:

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X