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Why Star Wars should be left to the fans

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  • #46





    https://www.ebay.com/i/113425772799?...3D113425772799

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    • #47
      Star Wars Cast And Crew Tell Their Behind The Scenes Stories Of Carrie Fisher

      https://www.ranker.com/list/star-war...deshow&slide=1

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      • #48
        Watch the epic new footage from Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

        ...
        Itís here: The new Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker footage that gives a first look at the climactic showdown between Rey (Daisy Ridley) and Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) along with several other new intriguing shots (above).

        The Episode IX footage is part of a sizzle reel first revealed to fans at the D23 Expo on Saturday in Anaheim, California.

        Images include a duel between Rey and Kylo amid a stormy sea (that might be on the ruins of the Death Star). Thereís a massive fleet of Star Destroyers. Thereís a new shot of Darth Vaderís helmet. Thereís Finn (John Boyega) and a new character named Jannah (Naomi Ackie) together in a cockpit. C-3PO with red eyes. A new glimpse of Leia (the late Carrie Fisher in footage originally shot for The Force Awakens). A gang of heroes approaching a bustling desert city. But the shot that truly stunned the crowd was a scene with Rey in a hooded black robe revealing an unfolding red double-sided lightsaber.
        ...
        https://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/new...x?ocid=msnbcrd

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        • #49
          He Was 'Star Wars' ' Secret Weapon, So Why Was He Forgotten?

          ...
          When thousands gathered Dec. 16 in Hollywood for the world premiere of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker — supposedly the last Skywalker film — they heard Bob Iger, Kathleen Kennedy and J.J. Abrams thank everyone from creator George Lucas to the actor who played R2-D2. But one name was not so much as whispered, despite this person's critical 1970s role in launching what would become the most successful movie franchise of all time: the all-but-forgotten Ashley Boone Jr.

          Although his contributions have been mostly lost to history — he doesn't even have a Wikipedia page — Boone, who died in 1994 at age 55, was a marketing and distribution wizard who championed Lucas' space opera when nearly everyone else — including the board of 20th Century Fox — thought it was a wacky idea doomed to fail. He shaped its release date and the number of theaters in which it rolled out and renewed its promotional campaign four times in order to keep it surging in theaters. He worked on a slew of other milestone movies, too, including The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Chariots of Fire, Ghostbusters and Thelma & Louise. Eventually, he became the first black president at a major Hollywood studio — even if that job lasted a grand total of four months — and went on to break many other barriers. And his kid sister left her job as a Pan Am flight attendant to follow him into the business and in 2013 became the first black president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

          "He was a star in every way," Cheryl Boone Isaacs says of her brother, 11 years her senior. "He was the cool, hip guy. Handsome, smart, down-to-earth. He was like Obama."
          ...
          https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/fe...=pocket-newtab

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          • #50
            I may have to pop this down in the modeling sub-forum, but for now ...


            One Man’s Epic Quest to Build a 20,000-Piece LEGO Star Destroyer

            It’s 44 pounds. It’s five feet long. It's leading a new era of LEGO models.

            ...
            Charles Anderson's Star Destroyer stretches almost 5 feet long, but opposite the enormity is an attention to detail—the filigree of LEGO figurine hands ringing the docking bay; the barnacle-like swath of pipes that make up the vents, pipes, and cannons—that makes the ship an artistic, architectural marvel.

            It took Charles 15 months and more than 500 hours to design and build his LEGO version of the iconic Imperial Star Destroyer, first imprinted on the collective consciousness when it crawled across the opening shot of Star Wars in 1977. Like the ship in the movie, Charles’s destroyer intimidates with its size. Weighing 44 pounds, the creation boasts almost 20,000 LEGO bricks, three times as many as the biggest set LEGO has ever published (the 2017 Star Wars: Millennium Falcon set, priced at $800).

            But it’s not the mass, weight, or obsessive detail that make Charles’s starship so remarkable. “There are definitely bigger and more impressive LEGO Star Destroyers out there,” says Charles, 43, a senior technical animator in Raleigh, North Carolina. “I’ve seen one over 10 feet long.” His construction is distinct because it’s custom, the first such LEGO model he’s built.

            Charles credits his Star Destroyer to a digital revolution transforming LEGO fandom. Throughout LEGO’s 62-year history, die-hards have always built wild, imaginative models from their plastic scrap heaps, but a new wave of fan-made digital resources has given builders the tools to craft custom models that rival the detail and integrity of official LEGO sets. Whether you’re looking for cutting-edge software to design your next project or a site that can generate a piece-by-piece instruction booklet, it’s likely out there, free for download.
            ...
            pmx030120fealego-001-1583334559.jpg?crop=0.943xw:0.707xh;0.0277xw,0.293xh&resize=1600:*.jpg


            ...
            https://www.popularmechanics.com/cul...=pocket-newtab
            (you do have to register with popmech to see the article.)

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            • #51
              pmx030120fealego-002-1583335069.jpg?resize=2048:*.jpg

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