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Not Canada!: Canada joins the Axis in 1939

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  • Not Canada!: Canada joins the Axis in 1939

    It's okay if this brings a chuckle because it should. Let's change things alot so that we can consider the alternate MILITARY-POLITICAL situation; I am aware that historically this could have never happened.

    On September 3rd, 1939 France and Britain declares war on Germany. Canadian Parliament debates for a week and decides to side with Germany. The government does so because Britain has recently alienated many English Canadians (let's say a major event in the 1930s that never occurred in reality) and the French Canadians never forgave France for abandoning them anyways.

    Poland falls, France falls and the Battle of the Atlantic shifts to a route running from South Africa or the Middle East to Britain. The United States is so shocked it just sits there and does nothing for the longest time while FDR tries to figure out how to get them into the war or make friends.

    Does Britain surrender?

    Are Canadian divisions used on the Russian Front somewhat effectively?

    What does the USA do?

    Where does Hitler devote the resources rebuiding destroyed U-boats to?
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  • #2
    so many canadians with ties to britain and govt siding with germany ?

    I guess not totally impossible afterall so many americans are of german descent

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    • #3
      Sorry

      There would have been more of a chance that the US sideded with Germanty than Canada.
      "Ask not what your country can do for you"

      Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

      you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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      • #4
        Newfoundland, still a part of the British Empire, declares war on Canada and invades. A new country, called Newfoundlandia is established after the war. I's the B'y that Builds the Boat becomes the national anthem. Country actually ends up even "nicer" than before.

        Sounds like a missed opportunity to me.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DingBat View Post
          Newfoundland, still a part of the British Empire, declares war on Canada and invades. A new country, called Newfoundlandia is established after the war. I's the B'y that Builds the Boat becomes the national anthem. Country actually ends up even "nicer" than before.

          Sounds like a missed opportunity to me.
          Aided no doubt by US National Guard regiments from the north shore states. I expect the Quebecois to circle their wagons and cut a deal with the US as well.

          In late 1941 the last Canadian nazi brigades retreat across the Arctic ice cap to link with the Germans in Norway.

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          • #6
            They better hope for an Axis win before the end of 1941!

            If Britain can figure out a way to keep their convoys afloat that long without Canadian escorts... won't be easy.
            "Why is the Rum gone?"

            -Captain Jack

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            • #7
              I was under the belief Canadian built ASW ships were available much later in the war.

              If the US intervenes. 'To Restore Order' of course, in the expulsion of Canadian Facists its likely to bring US participation in the European war a bit sooner

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              • #8
                The Royal Canadian Navy was responsible for 50% of all escorts by 1941, and these were the slow convoys the British pinned on the RCN. I don't see Britain having any chance at winning the Battle of the Atlantic.

                My conclusion: Canada is the most important belligerent on either side

                Please recognize the sarcasm but is Canada really THIS important in the world war?
                Like great battles? How about when they're animated for easy viewing?
                Visit my site, The Art of Battle: Animated Battle Maps at www.theartofbattle.com.

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                • #9
                  I never did trust them Canadians.

                  My first thought was that it would affect the food supply in the UK, but the US could have easily made it up. I suspect the biggest impact would be the sudden apppearance of U-boat stations in the NW Atlantic along Canada's seaboard -- any good harbors up there?
                  Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
                    I was under the belief Canadian built ASW ships were available much later in the war...
                    The first Canadian built corvette, commissioned as HMS TRILLIUM, was launched on June 26, 1940. She was joined over the next 2 months by 9 sisters built for the RN in various Canadian yards.

                    By the end of August, another 7 corvettes had been launched for the Royal Canadian navy.

                    However, there was a significant delay from the launching of these ships until they were operational. The RCN was in the beginning throes of undergoing its' huge wartime expansion, and simply didn't have the trained personnel to man them.

                    More detail here: http://www.legionmagazine.com/en/ind...-to-expansion/

                    Janos, Halifax harbour may fit your description of a good harbour. During WWII 300 convoys sailed from here. http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/halifax/index-eng.php
                    Amateurs study tactics, Professionals study logistics.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Janos View Post
                      I suspect the biggest impact would be the sudden apppearance of U-boat stations in the NW Atlantic along Canada's seaboard -- any good harbors up there?
                      Halifax and St. John's.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jonathan4290 View Post
                        The Royal Canadian Navy was responsible for 50% of all escorts by 1941, and these were the slow convoys the British pinned on the RCN. I don't see Britain having any chance at winning the Battle of the Atlantic.

                        My conclusion: Canada is the most important belligerent on either side

                        Please recognize the sarcasm but is Canada really THIS important in the world war?
                        In the Battle of the Atlantic it seems to be. I supose the construction of the ASW ships in Canada & their use by the RCN was part of some sort of organized industrial plan. So, if Canada is not available then the British would have built them elsewhere, trading off some lesser item for these all important ships.

                        A hostile Canada would ahve been anathem to Britian. Capturing stratigc points therin would have been a absolute priority, so its likely that British expeditions would have been attacking all over the seaboard. The BEF in France would have very likely been much smaller in 1940.

                        Now lets leave Canada in its historical position and discuss nazis in Australia.

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                        • #13
                          When we made our last trip through the maritimes, we went aboard HMCS Sackville, a WW2 corvette anchored in Halifax harbor. "Cramped" is far too kind a word of the conditions those sailors endured. The engine "room" was basically a 20 foot by 4 foot walkway between all the machinery. Even the engine room in Das Boot looked larger.

                          Serving on one of those ships in the dead of winter in the North Atlantic must have been, er, uncomfortable.

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                          • #14
                            Heil Hitler ay!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by johns624 View Post
                              Halifax and St. John's.
                              My geography of that part of world needs work! Thanks
                              Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
                              Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


                              "Never pet a burning dog."

                              RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
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                              http://www.sca.org
                              http://www.scv.org/
                              http://www.scouting.org/

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