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What if Corregidor had held out?

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  • What if Corregidor had held out?

    What if the Japanese invasion attempt of Corregidor had failed and was hurled back into the sea, as it almost was? How long could the Filippino-American forces have hold out? Remember, the vast majority of the Japanese landing craft and their crews had already been destroyed by Corregidor's Coastal and Beach artillery. How soon before General Homma would have mounted a second invasion attempt?

    I read of an account where General Wainright was telling another officer that there was food enough to last Corregidor's garrison until the end of June, given its present half-ration status.

    Added to this, a number of Corregidor's coastal batteries, although badly damaged, were by no means permanently knocked out and were within days of repair by their armorers and gun crews. The guns of Fort Drum and Fort Frank were still very much in action and capable of much further damage to the Japanese. In addition, there were a number of 155mm guns on moveable, Panama mounts that remained highly effective until the end of the siege.

    What say you ladies and gentlemen?
    "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

  • #2
    The food and water issue was pretty serious. The Japanese brought up heavy artillery and did a bit of high altitude bombing to the island. The presence of female nurses also affected command decisions to surrender. Plus there was a number of wounded in the tunnels.

    Be aware that Corregidor had been on normal Army rations while Bataan kept cutting their rations. The decision to hoard the regular American type rations for Corregidor and Forts Drum and Frank had been made a long time before. Examine the pictures of Americans on Corregidor surrendering and you will see they looked pretty well fed.

    Pruitt
    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
      The food and water issue was pretty serious. The Japanese brought up heavy artillery and did a bit of high altitude bombing to the island. The presence of female nurses also affected command decisions to surrender. Plus there was a number of wounded in the tunnels.

      Be aware that Corregidor had been on normal Army rations while Bataan kept cutting their rations. The decision to hoard the regular American type rations for Corregidor and Forts Drum and Frank had been made a long time before. Examine the pictures of Americans on Corregidor surrendering and you will see they looked pretty well fed.

      Pruitt
      There were less than 500 effective Japanese soldiers on the island after the sun rose, and it was plain that there wouldn't be anymore coming anytime soon.
      "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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      • #4
        Asumeing they held out until late May early June what would have changed?

        For the IJA/IJN it was a sideshow. For the US a much needed morale boost. Other than giving Japan food for thought, I doubt that it's further hold out would have made much difference.

        JohnB, teach me. I'm ready to learn.
        "Ask not what your country can do for you"

        Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

        you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Half Pint View Post
          Asumeing they held out until late May early June what would have changed?

          For the IJA/IJN it was a sideshow. For the US a much needed morale boost. Other than giving Japan food for thought, I doubt that it's further hold out would have made much difference.

          JohnB, teach me. I'm ready to learn.
          Not much would probably have changed, although Japanese General Homma would have most likely committed hari-kiri for his failed attack and saved the US the expense of hanging him as a war criminal after the war.

          The six month campaign and siege in the Philippines had already thrown a monkey wrench into the Japanese timetable of conquest in the Pacific. Had the first Corregidor invasion attempt failed, more Japanese troops and landing craft would have been diverted to the PI, perhaps slowing down the Japanese campaigns of conquest in New Guinea or the Solomon Islands.
          "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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          • #6
            The Battle of the Coral Sea could have been a total (rather than partial) disaster for the US if the Navy Intercept tunnel on Corrigedor had not been providing information on Japanese movements, and other electronic tidbits.

            God only knows what intelligence boons might have fallen into our hands if that place had continued to function for a few more months.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Exorcist View Post
              The Battle of the Coral Sea could have been a total (rather than partial) disaster for the US if the Navy Intercept tunnel on Corrigedor had not been providing information on Japanese movements, and other electronic tidbits.

              God only knows what intelligence boons might have fallen into our hands if that place had continued to function for a few more months.
              Thankfully, the US Navy evacuated all of those guys by submarine and flying boat before Corregidor fell.
              "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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              • #8
                All things considered, the Americans had no way to reinforce or resupply the Corregidor garrison. Eventually the Japanese would have been victorious. Any delay, even by six months would have not made much of a difference.
                God Save The Republic.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 2nd Rangers View Post
                  All things considered, the Americans had no way to reinforce or resupply the Corregidor garrison. Eventually the Japanese would have been victorious. Any delay, even by six months would have not made much of a difference.
                  Realistically speaking, Corregidor would have had to surrender by the end of June, after its food supplies and ability to pump fresh water from its wells ran out. While they never ran out of ammunition, they would have run out of diesel fuel.
                  "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Exorcist View Post
                    The Battle of the Coral Sea could have been a total (rather than partial) disaster for the US if the Navy Intercept tunnel on Corrigedor had not been providing information on Japanese movements, and other electronic tidbits.

                    God only knows what intelligence boons might have fallen into our hands if that place had continued to function for a few more months.
                    Do any books refer to the amout of signal intel produced by the Corrigador station, the Oahu station, and the US satation/s? this is a weak section in my library.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
                      Do any books refer to the amout of signal intel produced by the Corrigador station, the Oahu station, and the US satation/s? this is a weak section in my library.
                      This might help a bit:
                      http://corregidor.org/chs_crypto1/code_jump.htm
                      "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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