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Hornblower in WW2?

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  • Hornblower in WW2?

    In his 1942 book of short stories, "Gold from Crete", C. S. Forester concocted a great story called "What if Hitler had invaded England?". The story shows a fictional account of what may or might have happened if Hitler decided to just give it an all out attempt at a cross -channel invasion. It was very well researched and thought out and gives what I think is a very plausible action/reaction to such an event.
    (In NO WAY am I starting anything resembling the dreaded {sealion} session again...)
    I just thought that I'd put this out there and see if anyone else had read it recently and had a comment.
    Cheers! jose



    ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
    IN MARE IN COELO

  • #2
    Originally posted by jose50 View Post
    In his 1942 book of short stories, "Gold from Crete", C. S. Forester concocted a great story called "What if Hitler had invaded England?". The story shows a fictional account of what may or might have happened if Hitler decided to just give it an all out attempt at a cross -channel invasion. It was very well researched and thought out and gives what I think is a very plausible action/reaction to such an event.
    (In NO WAY am I starting anything resembling the dreaded {sealion} session again...)
    I just thought that I'd put this out there and see if anyone else had read it recently and had a comment.
    Cheers! jose



    I'm currently reading "Hitler's Armada" the latest book about Sealion. I'm virtually finished with it and I still haven't seen anything new in this book that wasn't already extensively written of in the past threads on this site. Bottom line is as it always was. The British ashore enjoyed excellent internal lines of communication and transport in their modern day road and rail networks. There were some 37 British and Commonwealth Divisions along the southern shore of the UK with IIRC, 17 more in nearby reserve, all of them with their normal TOE. There were tens of thousands of "Home Guardsmen" as well, armed and equipped in various fashions.

    RAF's Fighter Command was actually stronger by mid-September than at the beginning of the BoB, whereas the Luftwaffe was beginning to have difficulties in getting trained aircrews to replace those shot down over England.

    The Royal Navy had already deployed to bases much closer to the disputed waters along the south Kent shore and there was little to nothing the Luftwaffe could do to keep the RN from savaging the German invasion convoys, by day-in the face of RAF opposition and even moreso at night. Kriegsmarine participation in the battle would be wholely and completely inadequate for the job of protecting the German convoys given the sheer disparity in the size of the opposing forces. Every British ship sunk in battle would be quickly replaced by another of its class. The Kriegsmarine could not do the same, as there were none.

    No one disputes that the Germans could land some troops along the south coast of the UK, but it would be impossible to keep them supplied by follow up, supply convoys, especially in the face of a now fully alerted RN, RAF and ever growing numbers of British Army troops flooding into the contested invasion grounds.
    "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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    • #3
      In 1942, Forester, bless him, would not have been privy to even the faulty intel that the British had regarding German strength, dispositions and intentions let alone what the Home Forces were intending to do if the invasion had occurred. I can't see how his work could have been 'well researched' although I'm sure he did the best he could.
      Signing out.

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      • #4
        A Hornblower? When I first saw the title ot this thread, I thought you meant the fictional Captain.

        The RN did have a man who more than filled those boots, his name was Walker, and the tastics he devised and spread made him the greatest U-boat killer of the war.

        There was another Destroyer Skipper named Vian, but I dont see anything on him after the Bismarck sortie.
        "Why is the Rum gone?"

        -Captain Jack

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        • #5
          whaddya mean propaganda??

          Originally posted by Full Monty View Post
          I can't see how his work could have been 'well researched'
          Hmmm. It certainly LOOKED like Forester knew what he was talking about...the book SEEMED to have a 1942 copyright...do you think that the Admiralty or whomever gave some info to Forester in order for thim to write a "fictional" piece of propaganda?
          Have you read the piece? It flows along pretty much accurately. I wonder how much Forester really KNEW?
          Cheers...


          ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
          IN MARE IN COELO

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