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  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by marktwain View Post

    Votes for Herbert Hoover do not register.....
    But a vote for Grant should.

    Never liked Hoobert Heever.

    Leave a comment:


  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
    Just voted and nothing showed up.
    Votes for Herbert Hoover do not register.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Half Pint John
    replied
    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post

    Lincoln is top 5 imo. He was a great POTUS. I do feel though that FDR was # 1. It could be that Lincoln was the greatest POTUS from the GOP and that FDR was the greatest POTUS from the Democratic party.

    I created this thread poll b/c I believe most GOP Americans of today look to Reagan, while most Democratic Americans of today look to FDR. But it could actually be possible that the GOP of today look up more toward Lincoln compared to Reagan. The US Civil war is a very well known event in the USA so Lincoln therefore is a well known name with modern day Americans.
    Just what was great about Reagan? His hair color? His massive debt increase? Iran-Contra?

    http://politicsthatwork.com/economic...esident/reagan

    Scroll down. Clinton did better, much better.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stonewall_Jack
    replied
    Folks I wanted to share this 1982 ABC Documentary on FDR. The documentary is the best FDR documentary I have yet to see. And its incredible because we see photos, film and testimonials from the WW2 era... We also get to hear from the 4 living Presidents of the time whom shed their opinion on FDR.

    I feel that the documentary shows us how much better the USA was in the 1940s, when the family spirit was stronger and when the middle and upper class were stronger. The country was more dignified then compared to now. The following write up of mine is what I posted on another board,

    One of the benefits of this FDR documentary is that we get to hear opinions on FDR from the 4 living Presidents of the time which were Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan. During WW2, Nixon, Ford , Carter and Reagan were all young men...and they spoke with respect about how they viewed the legacy of FDR. Reagan specifically said that FDR had an ability to inspire the people and lead our country through WW2 which made FDR one of the countries greatest Presidents. Nixon said at his best, he(FDR) was a great leader. Carter talked about how FDR had a direct and positive impact on Carter when Carter was 14 years old. Because FDR helped to bring electricity to the Tennessee Valley and other Farmers of the country, Jimmy Carter as a 14 year old was a part of a farm family who benefited from programs brought to the country by FDR. Ford said as a young student he listened to FDRs fireside chats, and Ford was impressed by FDR.



    Even if one does not like FDR...Even if one is Pro Trump and anti FDR...if you care about America you will give the above video a shot and you will come away feeling more proud to be an American.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stonewall_Jack
    replied
    Originally posted by 17thfabn View Post
    You forgot the greatest president. Abraham Lincoln.
    Lincoln is top 5 imo. He was a great POTUS. I do feel though that FDR was # 1. It could be that Lincoln was the greatest POTUS from the GOP and that FDR was the greatest POTUS from the Democratic party.

    I created this thread poll b/c I believe most GOP Americans of today look to Reagan, while most Democratic Americans of today look to FDR. But it could actually be possible that the GOP of today look up more toward Lincoln compared to Reagan. The US Civil war is a very well known event in the USA so Lincoln therefore is a well known name with modern day Americans.

    Leave a comment:


  • 17thfabn
    replied
    Originally posted by Stonewall_Jack View Post

    Criticism is welcomed, that said What good things would you say of Roosevelt, Trump and Obama?
    The best thing I can say about President Obama is thank goodness he is gone.

    The two best things I can say about President Trump:

    He prevented a President HRC from happening.

    I wish he was more mature and well mannered. But I do appreciate that he stands up to the hard leftist of the Democratic-Socialist-Media party.

    Leave a comment:


  • 17thfabn
    replied
    You forgot the greatest president. Abraham Lincoln.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stonewall_Jack
    replied
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
    Of the four, I'd take Reagan. Trump and Obama are non-starters by comparison. FDR did more harm than good during his tenure in office.

    FDR tried to pack the Supreme Court. Later, by virtue of four terms in office, he did.
    FDR's New Deal ushered in an era of big federal government that was unwarranted, likely unconstitutional, and unnecessary. By all measures he was a Progressive of his time.
    In WW 2, FDR let Churchill, in particular, steamroller him into political moves that ultimately hurt the US and the world postwar. It was FDR's urging that forced the US Navy to base it's fleet out of Pearl Harbor rather than the West Coast as the Navy wanted. Doing the former was no deterrent to Japan and ultimately led to the disaster that happened.
    FDR had no real appreciation for the Machiavellian nature of Stalin as a dictator either.

    On the whole, FDR wasn't that great a President. Sure, he's better than Trump or Obama, but that's not saying much.

    Reagan had his share of mistakes but none were so bad as to massively expand government and create a polarized two power world at odds with one and other.
    The Japanese Empire was mega powerful and surely could have attacked other points in the USA in there most powerful days before the later stages of WW2. In Pearl Harbor the Japanese launched a surprise attack and inflicted considerable casualties against the USA. Japan thought such an attack would destroy American will, but in the end Japan lost WW2 due to American strength and its allies over the Axis powers.

    The criticism of FDR is noted. To that point all of The USA was stronger in WW2 compared to today. For example there were far far more good jobs in cities like Detroit, Buffalo, Chicago during WW2 compared to today. Americans industrial output during WW2 was massive and was a key role in winning WW2. Under FDR, the American economy boomed to heights we have never seen before and again in our countries great history. The leadership of FDR is something modern American political leaders from both sides should learn from today.

    The Way We Won: America's Economic Breakthrough During World War II

    America's response to World War II was the most extraordinary mobilization of an idle economy in the history of the world. During the war 17 million new civilian jobs were created, industrial productivity increased by 96 percent, and corporate profits after taxes doubled. The government expenditures helped bring about the business recovery that ;had eluded the New Deal. War needs directly consumed over one-third of the output of industry, but the expanded productivity ensured a remarkable supply of consumer goods to the people as well.

    America was the only country that saw an expansion of consumer goods despite wartime rationing. BY 1944, as a result of wage increases and overtime pay, real weekly wages before taxes in manufacturing were 50 percent higher than in 1939. The war also created entire new technologies, industries, and associated human skills.


    https://prospect.org/article/way-we-...g-world-war-ii


    Criticism is welcomed, that said What good things would you say of Roosevelt, Trump and Obama?
    Last edited by Stonewall_Jack; 23 Jan 19, 18:19.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stonewall_Jack
    replied
    President Reagan had a deep respect for President Roosevelt. That is something key that those that vote for Trump, Obama, and President Reagan should keep in mind.

    Reagan was a New Deal Democrat. He joked that he had probably become a Democrat by birth, given that his father, Jack, was so devoted to the Democratic Party. The younger Reagan cast his first presidential vote in 1932 for Franklin Roosevelt, and did so again in the succeeding three presidential contests.

    His faith in FDR remained undimmed even after World War II, when he called himself a New Dealer to the core. He summarized his views in this way: I thought government could solve all our postwar problems just as it had ended the Depression and won the war. I didnt trust big business. I thought government, not private companies, should own our big public utilities; if there wasnt enough housing to shelter the American people, I thought government should build it; if we needed better medical care, the answer was socialized medicine. When his brother, Moon, became a Republican and argued with his sibling, the younger Reagan concluded he was just spouting Republican propaganda.
    .....


    The Leadership Factor

    Roosevelt, according to Reagan, was a strong leader, one to emulate in certain respects. He had taken over the presidency during a time of unprecedented crisis and implemented a plan of action to bring the nation out of its doldrums. Reagan fondly recalled FDRs Fireside Chats, which were designed to give hope to the people. His strong, gentle, confident voice resonated across the nation with an eloquence that brought comfort and resilience to a nation caught up in a storm and reassured us that we could lick any problem. I will never forget him for that.

    As governor of California later, Reagan had to deal with a Democratic legislature. It occurred to me that I had an opportunity to go over their heads. How? He used radio and television to communicate directly with the people of California, a tactic he traced back to FDRs Fireside Chats, which, he commented, made an indelible mark on me during the Depression.


    As president, Reagan often mentioned his admiration for FDRs spirit of leadership. On a trip back to his alma mater, Eureka College, in 1984, he reminded his listeners what it was like to experience the Great Depression, and how the Fireside Chats had been so reassuring. All of us who lived through those years, he instructed them, remember the drabness the depression brought. But we remember, too, how people pulled together, that sense of community and shared values, that belief in American enterprise and democracy that saw us through. It was that engrained American optimism, that sense of hope Franklin Roosevelt so brilliantly summoned and mobilized. In his view, FDR was instrumental in reviving an inherent American optimism that was endangered by the economic crisis.

    Twice he spoke at events honoring Roosevelt. The first was in 1982. He had visited the FDR exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution, then returned to the White House for a luncheon that included the Roosevelt family. Naturally, when speaking in front of someones family, one avoids comments critical of a loved one. The speech was instead a tribute to FDRs leadership. Reagan called him one of historys truly monumental figures, an American giant, a leader who shaped, inspired, and led our people through perilous times, one who could reach out to men and women of diverse races and backgrounds and inspire them with new hope and new confidence in war and peace.

    He recalled the first time he had seen FDR, a moment he still remembered vividly campaign parade in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1936.

    "What a wave of affection and pride swept through that crowd as he passed by in an open car a familiar smile on his lips, jaunty and confident, drawing from us reservoirs of confidence and enthusiasm some of us had forgotten we had during those hard years. Maybe that was FDR's greatest gift to us. He really did convince us that the only thing we had to fear was fear itself."





    http://www.firstprinciplesjournal.co...x?article=1082
    Last edited by Stonewall_Jack; 23 Jan 19, 17:33.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stonewall_Jack
    replied
    Good to see Matt Jones voted, hope all is well with you brother.


    FDR was the greatest American to ever live. TAG and a few others in our world might agree with this in the future. In the 1940s, Americans were strong, dignified and honorable. What a great time, I would love to have lived in those times when the American spirit was stronger then ever.

    Reagan voted for FDR 4 times from 33-45, that is also a beautiful thing. Ronald Reagan was inspired by Roosevelt.

    Leave a comment:


  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    Of the four, I'd take Reagan. Trump and Obama are non-starters by comparison. FDR did more harm than good during his tenure in office.

    FDR tried to pack the Supreme Court. Later, by virtue of four terms in office, he did.
    FDR's New Deal ushered in an era of big federal government that was unwarranted, likely unconstitutional, and unnecessary. By all measures he was a Progressive of his time.
    In WW 2, FDR let Churchill, in particular, steamroller him into political moves that ultimately hurt the US and the world postwar. It was FDR's urging that forced the US Navy to base it's fleet out of Pearl Harbor rather than the West Coast as the Navy wanted. Doing the former was no deterrent to Japan and ultimately led to the disaster that happened.
    FDR had no real appreciation for the Machiavellian nature of Stalin as a dictator either.

    On the whole, FDR wasn't that great a President. Sure, he's better than Trump or Obama, but that's not saying much.

    Reagan had his share of mistakes but none were so bad as to massively expand government and create a polarized two power world at odds with one and other.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stonewall_Jack
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
    Just voted and nothing showed up.
    I can see that tt says in the poll you voted for Reagan.

    3 votes so far. Two for FDR And one for Reagan

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Just voted and nothing showed up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stonewall_Jack
    replied
    Reagan: FDR's True Heir

    COMMENTARY
    By Henry Olsen
    July 02, 2017

    Eighty-five years ago this week, Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "New Deal" speech changed American politics forever. Promising suffering Americans that he would spare neither tradition nor expense to restore hope, FDR's election ushered in a growth in government that had been previously unimaginable. Ever since, political leaders have divided themselves into left and right, battling over the size and expense of government.

    Common wisdom holds that Ronald Reagan, a devoted FDR acolyte during Roosevelt's life, became the most powerful opponent of his legacy after Reagan's swing to the right. But the common wisdom is wrong. Reagan, in word and deed, was actually FDR's true heir.


    https://www.realclearpolitics.com/ar...ir_134354.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Stonewall_Jack
    replied
    I vote FDR,

    FDR vs. Reagan?

    by Steve Benen
    December 28, 2008
    POLITICS

    FDR VS. REAGAN?

    Its a showdown between the two most influential presidents of the 20th Century. Franklin D. Roosevelt versus Ronald W. Reagan.

    Forty-five percent (45%) of U.S. voters say FDR, the Democratic father of the big government New Deal who led the country to victory in World War II, was the better president of the two.

    But 40% say Reagan, the Republican champion of small-government conservatism and the winner of the Cold War, was a better president. Fifteen percent (15%) arent sure which of the two they like better in a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey.

    https://washingtonmonthly.com/2008/12/28/fdr-vs-reagan/

    Leave a comment:

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