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WI...There was no Strategic Bombing CAmpaign during WWII

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  • WI...There was no Strategic Bombing CAmpaign during WWII

    This question was inspired the best bombing raid of ww2 by 17pounder thread. I propose that the POD (point of divergence) is that all interwar airforces, are formulated on tactical support strategy. This causes no thought being given to 4 engine bombers and the idea even if possible the costs in material and manpower would be too great to consider it viable. This would have all the players in WWII having fighters and a great deal of resources tied up in CAS and Precision Strike Aircraft. All would have operational radius's with Army or Navy missions in mind.

    Last edited by PzKfwBob; 09 Nov 07, 17:02.
    Eternal War(gaming) Armoured Struggle Car Bob

    History does not record anywhere at any time a religion that has any rational basis.
    Lazarus Long

    Draw the blinds on yesterday and it's all so much scarier....
    David Bowie

  • #2
    Chatting this over at lunch my friend opined this could make a large difference in the battle of the Atlantic. Turning a vary small proportion of the unused heavy bomber production to aircraft types suitable for ASW patrols would more than double the ASW aircraft for hunting submarines. He thought this would be particualrly important from mid 1941 thru 1942.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
      Chatting this over at lunch my friend opined this could make a large difference in the battle of the Atlantic. Turning a vary small proportion of the unused heavy bomber production to aircraft types suitable for ASW patrols would more than double the ASW aircraft for hunting submarines. He thought this would be particualrly important from mid 1941 thru 1942.
      I agree. It's always been my opinion that using long range bombers is what turned the tide against the U boat.
      If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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      • #4
        I know only fragments about how aircraft were used against the submarines. Most of my knowledge on this subject revolves around how radio signal intel was used for probable locations of the German subs.

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        • #5
          Albert Speer, in post war interrogation, judged that the time lost just to AIR RAID WARNINGS cost the Germany economy production the equivalent of one PZ Corp per quarter.
          "Ask not what your country can do for you"

          Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

          you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
            I know only fragments about how aircraft were used against the submarines. Most of my knowledge on this subject revolves around how radio signal intel was used for probable locations of the German subs.
            The combination of B-24, airborne radar, and searchlight made running on the surface during the day or night a dangerous proposition.

            At night, B-24's would acquire the target with radar and when close enough they would hit the spotlight. Any submarine in the spotlight would be hard pressed to evade or dive in time.
            If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by freightshaker View Post
              The combination of B-24, airborne radar, and searchlight made running on the surface during the day or night a dangerous proposition.

              At night, B-24's would acquire the target with radar and when close enough they would hit the spotlight. Any submarine in the spotlight would be hard pressed to evade or dive in time.
              What years was this done? I suspect the Hudsons and other cuties of 1939 were not so effective. How would a aircraft zipping along at 150+ knots hold a searchlight on a sub, that was probablly moving at a unknown angle to the aircrafts line of flight?

              I recall some USN aircraft, Catalinas, were based in Britian & flying patrols before December 1941. Any details on this?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
                What years was this done? I suspect the Hudsons and other cuties of 1939 were not so effective. How would a aircraft zipping along at 150+ knots hold a searchlight on a sub, that was probablly moving at a unknown angle to the aircrafts line of flight?

                I recall some USN aircraft, Catalinas, were based in Britian & flying patrols before December 1941. Any details on this?
                1942 and later. I'll do some digging and come up with some details. As for the searchlight, I'm unsure where it was mounted but heading and bearing would be already known for the Uboat due to the Radar acquisition. It's just a matter of matching a heading.
                If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by freightshaker View Post
                  1942 and later.
                  The remark I recall refered to these present during the Bismarck affair. My brief search produced ambigious & useless results. Definitly needs some research

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                  • #10
                    Getting back to the main topic. Anyone have time to calculate roughly how much more for transport, air interdiction, ASW, reconissance, CAS... missions the elimination of the stratigic air campaign might mean? A straight up comparison of the bomb weight dropped on stratigic tarets vs tactical targets might be a starting point.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
                      What years was this done? I suspect the Hudsons and other cuties of 1939 were not so effective. How would a aircraft zipping along at 150+ knots hold a searchlight on a sub, that was probablly moving at a unknown angle to the aircrafts line of flight?
                      The light was normally fixed to the wing, and it would be aimed by simply pointing the aircraft in the direction of the submarine (the light would not be switched on until the aircraft was almost upon the submarine)
                      I recall some USN aircraft, Catalinas, were based in Britian & flying patrols before December 1941. Any details on this?
                      Not USN aircraft, but a small number of USN personnel lent to the RAF to help familiarise the RAF pilots to the Catalinas supplied to Britain as part of Lend Lease. The most famous incident is the RAF Catalina which found the Bismark, it was carrying a USN member as the second pilot

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