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The Battle of Albury

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  • #46
    Originally posted by panther3485
    ...Btw, if my contribution is 'boring the hell out of the audience' or isn't appreciated, they need only say so and I'll do something about it. What say you, guys?
    Now don't take offense, old boy, we had merely strayed into "what the hell difference does that make" territory, rather than concentrating on the question at hand.
    The Purist

    Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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    • #47
      I may be barking up the wrong tree here.

      But didn't the 3" CS in later years have a HEAT warhead? If so, was that about in 1940? I don't think it was, but you can never tell.
      Winnie says
      ---------------------------------
      "He fell out of a Gestapo car, over a bridge, and onto a railway line. Then was run over by the Berlin Express.

      It was an Accident."
      Herr Flick.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Listy View Post
        I may be barking up the wrong tree here.

        But didn't the 3" CS in later years have a HEAT warhead? If so, was that about in 1940? I don't think it was, but you can never tell.
        Nope,...those were the 94mm (or 95mm) guns in the Centaur and Cromwell CS designs..., and yes, they could do nasty damage.
        The Purist

        Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by The Purist View Post
          "Now don't take offense, old boy,...."
          Alright, but not so much of the "old", OK! (even if I am) And besides, you're not the only one around here who can get grouchy.


          Originally posted by The Purist View Post
          "....we had merely strayed into "what the hell difference does that make" territory, rather than concentrating on the question at hand."
          Like most other threads here, then!

          Yeah, alright - point taken.

          However, by way of fair warning, you should be advised that there's a certain type of bait I find virtually irresistible - as if you didn't know that already.
          Last edited by panther3485; 03 Jun 07, 10:57.
          "England expects that every man will do his duty!" (English crew members had better get ready for a tough fight against the combined French and Spanish fleets because that's what England expects! However, Scotland, Wales and Ireland appear to expect nothing so the Scottish, Welsh and Irish crew members can relax below decks if they like!)

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          • #50
            Terrain to be fought over

            From a 12th Corps memo of August 1940.

            Subject: Defence in depth. Grid System.

            1. The success of the German invasion in France was lagrely due to the fact that behind the frontier fortifications there existed no organised system of defence. Hastily reconnoitred, ill prepared and unco-ordinated positions failed to hold, and in many cases even to check the rapid advance of the German armoured and motorised formations.<>.

            It is generally accepted that a German attempt to invade this country will take the form of simultaneous landings by sea and air in selected areas where he has gained local air superiority. If he succeeds in these initial landings, and continues to hold local air superiority, it can equally be accepted that his general form of attack will be attempts at rapid penetration by A.F.V.'s assisted by air borne landings further and further inland.

            The generally enclosed nature, however, of the country in Kent, Sussex and Surrey, consisting as it does of an intricate mass of woods, streams, winding roads, and railways running through deep cuttings and over high embankments, offers considerable facilities to check this form of attack and confine any successful German penetration into definite areas where it can be ultimately destroyed.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Gooner
              The generally enclosed nature, however, of the country in Kent, Sussex and Surrey, consisting as it does of an intricate mass of woods, streams, winding roads, and railways running through deep cuttings and over high embankments, offers considerable facilities to check this form of attack and confine any successful German penetration into definite areas where it can be ultimately destroyed.
              Having travelled through Kent by foot, bicycle, automobile and train I can assure others that this is very true. Most British rail lines exist in sunken cuttings that run for kilomenters, not surfacing except for a few bridges, level crossings and, of course, villages and towns.

              Viewed from above, there is almost a series of AT ditches dug from west to east between Ashford- Folkestone-Dover and another from Canterbury-Sandwich-Isle of Thanet. From north to south there runs a similar obstacle from Dover to Canterbury and Ashford to Canterbury.

              Any crossing not taking place at a village or town, or at the level crossing would need to be taken by assault first and then require some engineering work. However, that being said, for the Germans to get off the beach and inland in this scenario they would have already had to overcome these difficulties.
              The Purist

              Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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