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What if the Germans started building a bridge through La Manshe in 1940?

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  • #31
    But then the economically superior and very production capable Allies didn't even attempt to do something like this. Instead they created artificial harbors, which were virtually destroyed by the Channel's weather. A project of this magnitude would have to be started in 1937 or 38 to even be close to completion for a supply of a 1940 invasion. Something tells me France might object to this. Also, once this bridge has been completed, it has effectively closed off the Channel to shipping. Any products going to the Mediterranean or western France will have to go around Britain. As for destroying the bridge, all you need to do is create a breach and mother nature will do the rest.

    Forgetting things, I think not. Just remembering how thing work in the real world.
    If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Duke William View Post
      Don't let these Imperialist Dogs stop you from having these Creative Thoughts. The Bridge Idea is a GOOD Idea.

      The Only REAL Problem is that you suggested it for the wrong side.

      If it were an Allied Plan, it would be Completely 100% Possible.

      You see, the Imperialists have a tendency to forget things.

      The Sub Pens in The French Ports, some of which are still standing today & were Impervious to Air & Sea Attack.

      The Maunsell Ack/Ack Sea Forts.

      Don't worry brother, Duke William has Your back.
      These ravings are from the same guy who thinks that bolting 1,000 Maus tanks together, or turning the Bismarck into a submarine would be a war winning idea.

      FYI. Re: the sub pens. They were not impervious to air attacks. Late in the war, the British developed delayed fuse bombs of several thousand pounds weight that went through all that reinforced concrete like a hot knife through butter. So much for "impervious" sub pens.
      "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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      • #33
        Originally posted by johnbryan View Post
        These ravings are from the same guy who thinks that bolting 1,000 Maus tanks together, or turning the Bismarck into a submarine would be a war winning idea.

        FYI. Re: the sub pens. They were not impervious to air attacks. Late in the war, the British developed delayed fuse bombs of several thousand pounds weight that went through all that reinforced concrete like a hot knife through butter. So much for "impervious" sub pens.
        Yo! Dook! Read up about the "Grand Slam" bomb! It would easily ruin a submarine pen's whole day!
        "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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        • #34
          "Lets scope out the problem a bit: such a causeway might be 20000m long, 1000m wide and 50m high to get a reasonable height above sea level. That means the German engineers would have to move 1 billion (thats 1000 million for you Brits) cubic meters of rock. Assume its 1 ton per cubic meter so the job is to move 1 billion tons of rock.

          Lets assume we have 1 million French/other allied POWs and 1 million German soldiers available as a labour force. If we have 100,000 1 ton trucks we can move 100,000 tons of rock per day. It would take 1000 days to move that much rock. So about 2.5 to 3 years."

          At this point I'm estimating:

          1. The ammount of rock in this exercise is short by about 60%

          2. Theres no provsion in that plan for transporting vehical fuel, food for the laborers, ect... All that could be overcome by building a dozen or so railroad tracks to & onto the causeway.

          3. The tides & ordinary currents in the central Channel would remove upwards of 120,000 tons of rock per day from the causeway face. So to get it across some 300,000 tons per day would be required to stay on the three year schedule.

          4. The math is beyond me but I'm speculating the pressure of the east to west current would either drive the water over the causeway, which would collapse it though erosion. Or if it were built tall enough to prevent that then the face on the current side would start collapsing.

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          • #35
            Or...........

            Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
            "Lets scope out the problem a bit: such a causeway might be 20000m long, 1000m wide and 50m high to get a reasonable height above sea level. That means the German engineers would have to move 1 billion (thats 1000 million for you Brits) cubic meters of rock. Assume its 1 ton per cubic meter so the job is to move 1 billion tons of rock.

            Lets assume we have 1 million French/other allied POWs and 1 million German soldiers available as a labour force. If we have 100,000 1 ton trucks we can move 100,000 tons of rock per day. It would take 1000 days to move that much rock. So about 2.5 to 3 years."

            At this point I'm estimating:

            1. The ammount of rock in this exercise is short by about 60%

            2. Theres no provsion in that plan for transporting vehical fuel, food for the laborers, ect... All that could be overcome by building a dozen or so railroad tracks to & onto the causeway.

            3. The tides & ordinary currents in the central Channel would remove upwards of 120,000 tons of rock per day from the causeway face. So to get it across some 300,000 tons per day would be required to stay on the three year schedule.

            4. The math is beyond me but I'm speculating the pressure of the east to west current would either drive the water over the causeway, which would collapse it though erosion. Or if it were built tall enough to prevent that then the face on the current side would start collapsing.
            They could just have Erected a Combination of The Krupp Landing Bridge & The Dortmunder Union Landing Bridge in less than 3 Months time & found a way to have protected it as well.

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