Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

German Tank Myths

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • German Tank Myths

    OK, I cannot provide a reference, so don't ask for one & I know this will become a highly controversial topic due to it's content, but I once read that there were actually 9 Maus Tanks Built & that went into Combat in Berlin during the final days of Hitlers Reign & that on the Russian Steppes there were also 14 Panther II's that had been built and were put into combat fighting off the Russian Horde.

    This is afterall the Alternative timeline, so it seemed like the perfect place to put this.

  • #2
    Probably worth checking out this thread.

    http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...ad.php?t=40470

    I know Duke knows about it but for the benefit of others .....
    Last edited by Full Monty; 06 Jul 06, 21:10.
    Signing out.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Full Monty
      Probably worth checking out this thread.

      http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...ad.php?t=40470

      I know Duke knows about it but for the benefit of others .....
      Well, that's certainly going to cut down on the responses. No way I'll pass up 1,600 Posts after that one now.

      Comment


      • #4
        from all my readings, no Maus tanks ever went into combat, they were still in the pre-production assembly and testing line.
        "Freedom cannot exist without discipline, self-discipline, and rights cannot exist without duties. Those who do not observe their duties do not deserve their rights."--Oriana Fallaci

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by piero1971
          from all my readings, no Maus tanks ever went into combat, they were still in the pre-production assembly and testing line.
          They're not in the Panzer Truppen records for any unit (fighting or not) for the end of WW2.
          Signing out.

          Comment


          • #6
            i've got over a hundred books to do with tanks. not in one of them can i remember seeing anything about the maus seeing action. next time i go to bovington tank museum, i'll see if i can find something in the archives. as a friend of the tank museum, i believe i'm allowed access to certain material. if not i'll see if i can talk to Mr Fletcher. if he doesn't know, no-one else will.
            Big40 events. By skinheads for skinheads.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by pompey john
              i've got over a hundred books to do with tanks. not in one of them can i remember seeing anything about the maus seeing action. next time i go to bovington tank museum, i'll see if i can find something in the archives. as a friend of the tank museum, i believe i'm allowed access to certain material. if not i'll see if i can talk to Mr Fletcher. if he doesn't know, no-one else will.
              Ahhhhh. Mr. Fletcher. You know him too?

              Pssst, what's the password?

              Just out of curiosity, who IS Mr. Fletcher?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Duke William
                Well, that's certainly going to cut down on the responses. No way I'll pass up 1,600 Posts after that one now.
                Maybe a 'what if?' question would be appropriate. Something like 'What if several Maus tanks were deployed against the Soviets on the approach to Berlin?'

                Just a thought.
                Signing out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Full Monty
                  They're not in the Panzer Truppen records for any unit (fighting or not) for the end of WW2.
                  Your factual information will never stop the infantile dreams of some deluded people. They "feel" that there were in fact 9 Maus tanks committed to action against the Soviets in the closing days of the war and that they would have been a war-winning piece of armament had they in fact, been mass produced, never mind all of the facts showing totally the complete opposite.
                  "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Full Monty
                    Maybe a 'what if?' question would be appropriate. Something like 'What if several Maus tanks were deployed against the Soviets on the approach to Berlin?'

                    Just a thought.
                    My guess is. "Not much." A momentary "speed bump" on the way to the Berlin Chancellory. Between the tank's nightmarish engine set up that was a sure "operational casualty in the making" and the dual artillery armament, utilizing bagged gunpowder for the larger of the two, meant that a flash explosion was always possible in such a closed environment. Lastly, it's overwhelming size meant that it had to ford every river and stream it came across using it's schnorkle.

                    Just one more example of Hitler's delusional stupidity.
                    "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      i dont believe that the Maus was even intended for offensive action, just local defense and counter-attacks. It would not have been an offensive weapon simply due to the operational nightmare that testing showed. Even if 100 of the beasts were put into Berlin, it would have changed nothing. The were slow and cumbersome, and without support would be destroyed piecemeal. Tank against tank it was nearly indestructible, but again without support from lighter tanks and infantry was useless.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Duke William
                        Ahhhhh. Mr. Fletcher. You know him too?

                        Pssst, what's the password?

                        Just out of curiosity, who IS Mr. Fletcher?
                        my apologies, David Fletcher is the currator of the tank museum at bovington. if anyone has seen clips from the museum on tv programmes and someone talking about tanks, it's probably him.
                        Big40 events. By skinheads for skinheads.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by johnbryan
                          Your factual information will never stop the infantile dreams of some deluded people. They "feel" that there were in fact 9 Maus tanks committed to action against the Soviets in the closing days of the war and that they would have been a war-winning piece of armament had they in fact, been mass produced, never mind all of the facts showing totally the complete opposite.
                          Still, there are standards to maintain, references to quote etc. If certain posters wish to drag a thread through the gutter there's no reason to jump in head first after them!
                          My guess is. "Not much." A momentary "speed bump" on the way to the Berlin Chancellory. Between the tank's nightmarish engine set up that was a sure "operational casualty in the making" and the dual artillery armament, utilizing bagged gunpowder for the larger of the two, meant that a flash explosion was always possible in such a closed environment. Lastly, it's overwhelming size meant that it had to ford every river and stream it came across using it's schnorkle.
                          It was truly nightmarish and at that point of the war it could not have made any difference if it had been deployed!

                          Just one more example of Hitler's delusional stupidity.
                          Here I'm going to differ. It is, in my opinion, symptomatic of the problems at the heart of the Nazi state. The competition for resources encouraged innovation leading to some of WW2's most advanced weaponry being developed by German scientists. The flip side of that was that there was no real focus leading to duplication and a plethora of weapon systems when what was really needed was a few mass-produced aircraft/tanks/ships etc. that were effective if unspectacular. The flaw was not just Hitler's, it was the whole Nazi philosophy.
                          Last edited by Full Monty; 07 Jul 06, 21:01.
                          Signing out.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Good point ...

                            Originally posted by Full Monty
                            Here I'm going to differ. It is, in my opinion, symptomatic of the problems at the heart of the Nazi state. The competition for resources encouraged innovation leading to some of WW2's most advanced weaponry being developed by German scientists. The flip side of that was that there was no real focus leading to duplication and a plethora of weapon systems when what was really needed was a few mass-produced aircraft/tanks/ships etc. that were effective if unspectacular. The flaw was not just Hitler's, it was the whole Nazi philosophy.
                            It is symptomatic of totalitarian regimes that for the most influential personalities - the gaulieters, the aparatchiks - proximity to the center of power or its satellites was in almost all individual cases the overriding imperative. And I suppose we think that we now know, following the collapse of the Soviet Union, that this is not a good thing. 'Rentier' economy on a global scale. It could be argued that Speer was an altruistic exception; but it is certain that if he was such he was one of a very few. The question is, why did Germany's totalitarianism produce military economic mayhem while the Soviet Union's produced a workable if prosaic response to the state's desperate needs?
                            Demonslayer

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't share your feelings about Speer, but that's not for this thread.

                              I'd argue that the Nazis were a 'special case' because of their almost religious faith in their ideology. In the USSR the top scientists were given specific projects and objectives whereas in Germany far loose requirements often led to three or four development teams working on similar projects and competing for resources. It was an atmosphere that encouraged great scientific leaps, especially given Hitler's prediliction for radical ideas. It was very wasteful though.
                              Signing out.

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X