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  • Tigers ion the PTO...

    What if the Germans managed to deliver Tiger I tanks ( or others ) in larger numbers to the Japanese? Would it have changed the tank combat situation in the PTO?

    There were existing contracts between the Germans and Japanese about tank deliveries ( there is a photo of Japanese trialing a Tiger I in Germany ), but it was to late. All tanks produced saw combat on the German fronts.

    I think that the Japanese, even if they got a larger number of superior tanks, couldn´t handled them, because lacking of tactical knowledge.

    Your opinions please

    MK

    Last edited by M.Koch; 05 Mar 06, 04:31.
    The advance is extraordinary difficult, because of three reasons. First of them, as always, is the high fighting spirit of the German soldier.Gen. Eisenhower in a letter to Gen. Marshall, July 1944

  • #2
    Originally posted by M.Koch
    What if the Germans managed to deliver Tiger I tanks ( or others ) in larger numbers to the Japanese? Would it have changed the tank combat situation in the PTO?

    There were existing contracts between the Germans and Japanese about tank deliveries ( there is a photo of Japanese trialing a Tiger I in Germany ), but it was to late. All tanks produced saw combat on the German fronts.

    I think that the Japanese, even if they got a larger number of superior tanks, couldn´t handled them, because lacking of tactical knowledge.
    It certainly would have been an interesting wrinkle, wouldn't it?

    Off the Asian continent, they would not have been much good -- too big and too heavy for the roads and bridges. I suspect that would also have been true on the continent, but to a lesser degree.

    I also think the Germans needed every tank they could make.

    I also doubt their ability to deliver them.

    I think the best advantage the Germans could have given the Japanese in that regard was the optics, which were far ahead of the rest of the world's. That would have a made some difference, but mainly just higher US/Aussie casualties, no effect in the ultimate result of the war.
    Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
    Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


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    • #3
      The Japanese probably would have had trouble transporting them anywhere.
      Blackcloud6

      Refighting World War II - One hex at a time!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Blackcloud6
        The Japanese probably would have had trouble transporting them anywhere.
        Yep, absolutely -- had the Germans been able to get one to them!
        Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
        Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


        "Never pet a burning dog."

        RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
        http://www.mormon.org
        http://www.sca.org
        http://www.scv.org/
        http://www.scouting.org/

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        • #5
          Question is, how had the allies reacted? In the ETO it was said in general, that it need 5 Shermans to kill a Tiger or Panther. That with the more open battlefields in Europe. The Japanese didn´t used their tanks well ( depending on traditions, ignorance and of course terrain restrictions in the PTO ) even when they had the chance to do so. But what if, for example, the Japanese counterattack on the Peleliu airfield was made by Tigers or PzKw IVs instead of HA-GO tin can tanks...would have changed the battle, mabe the invasion!?
          Also the Japanese used their tanks in the static defense role, as bunkers or strongpoints, well camoflaged. But it´s a difference to attack a burried in HA-GO or a Tiger, especially when the attacking infantry is pinned and needs the help from their own tanks, but you can´t deploy them because the enemy kills your approaching tanks at long range with an 88mm instead a 37mm gun.

          MK
          The advance is extraordinary difficult, because of three reasons. First of them, as always, is the high fighting spirit of the German soldier.Gen. Eisenhower in a letter to Gen. Marshall, July 1944

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          • #6
            well, first, how to get tigers to Japan in high numbers? I think one was delivered by submarine - or was it a panther?

            even germany was not able to mass produce Tigers...

            but assuming any would get in Japan's usage, what woudl they be used for?

            - mobile pillboxes on isolated islands?

            - ineffective tanks in Jungle warfare in Papua/New Guinea or Philippines

            - killing even more Chinese peasants

            - kept to be used on the Kanto plain for the never-to-come but long awaited final battle with US landing forces

            - destroyed on the ground by US infantry at short range, or by rockets from marauding Corsair or Thunderbolts?

            all in all, they would have been destroyed. Japan had really no chance whatsoever against the industrial might of the USA.
            "Freedom cannot exist without discipline, self-discipline, and rights cannot exist without duties. Those who do not observe their duties do not deserve their rights."--Oriana Fallaci

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