Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Gott in command 8th Army

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gott in command 8th Army

    Gott survives the strafing of his downed Bristol Bombay transport and takes command of the 8th Army. Montgomery takes command of British forces involved in Torch as planned. Does this have any significant long term effects?
    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

  • #2
    Rommel in Alexandria in September. Monty in Tunis in December. Probably.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Gooner View Post
      Rommel in Alexandria in September. Monty in Tunis in December. Probably.
      Possibly not - Rommel had already been stopped by 1st Alamein "the forgotten battle" And Gott is reckoned by many nobody's fool.
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

      Comment


      • #4
        No, possibly not. I'd give Gott about 50:50 chance of holding Rommel at Alam Halfa but probably no more than 10% chance of then smashing Rommels army at El Alamein.

        In the July battles the Axis highest panzer count was 54. For Alam Halfa that was back upto 200.

        The South African historian John Agar-Hamilton said this of Gott: "It has not been unknown for a commander to pass from disaster to disaster, but it is quite without precedent for any commander to pass from promotion to promotion as a reward for a succession of disasters."

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Gooner View Post
          No, possibly not. I'd give Gott about 50:50 chance of holding Rommel at Alam Halfa but probably no more than 10% chance of then smashing Rommels army at El Alamein.

          In the July battles the Axis highest panzer count was 54. For Alam Halfa that was back upto 200.

          The South African historian John Agar-Hamilton said this of Gott: "It has not been unknown for a commander to pass from disaster to disaster, but it is quite without precedent for any commander to pass from promotion to promotion as a reward for a succession of disasters."
          Yes, but the performance of the British Army as a whole up to mid-1942 -it must be admitted-was largely " a succession of disasters " ,regardless of who was in command.
          "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
          Samuel Johnson.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BELGRAVE View Post
            Yes, but the performance of the British Army as a whole up to mid-1942 -it must be admitted-was largely " a succession of disasters " ,regardless of who was in command.
            Well that's not true.

            But anyway its quite amazing that Gott was ever considered for command of 8th Army considering his record: -

            7th Armd. Div. in Crusader - failed to keep this very powerful formation concentrated and had it (almost) destroyed piecemeal.

            XIII Corps at Gazala - Infantry this time. At least partially responsible for having 150th Brigade Box overrun, whilst 8th Army did bugger all.

            XIII Corps at Mersah Matruh - Bolted in retreat leaving his own and other troops in the lurch where bold action could easily have inflicted a sharp defeat.

            XIII Corps in the July battles - Small disaster on the Ruweisat Ridge where the Kiwis, Indians and Tanks took a wholly avoidable kicking.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hmm... the above sounds above average for any British General 1940-43. Given a litter of runty kittens Gott looks like the pick.

              ..annnd wi that I'm owta here

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Gooner View Post
                Well that's not true.

                But anyway its quite amazing that Gott was ever considered for command of 8th Army considering his record: -

                7th Armd. Div. in Crusader - failed to keep this very powerful formation concentrated and had it (almost) destroyed piecemeal.

                XIII Corps at Gazala - Infantry this time. At least partially responsible for having 150th Brigade Box overrun, whilst 8th Army did bugger all.

                XIII Corps at Mersah Matruh - Bolted in retreat leaving his own and other troops in the lurch where bold action could easily have inflicted a sharp defeat.

                XIII Corps in the July battles - Small disaster on the Ruweisat Ridge where the Kiwis, Indians and Tanks took a wholly avoidable kicking.
                But it is true, regrettably.

                Up to mid 1942, the record of the British Army shows an almost unbroken succession of defeat and evacuation when matched against the forces of Nazi Germany and Japan. I recommend, And We Shall Shock Them - The British Army in the Second World War by General Sir David Fraser.

                The title is a quotation from Shakespeare's King John.
                "Come the three corners of the world in arms,
                And we shall shock them. Nought shall make us rue,
                If England to itself do rest but true"
                .

                Gott was simply a product of his environment.
                Last edited by BELGRAVE; 24 Jun 16, 20:05.
                "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                Samuel Johnson.

                Comment

                Latest Topics

                Collapse

                Working...
                X