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Spartacus makes it to Sicily

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  • Spartacus makes it to Sicily

    I just got done watching Spartacus and I thought to myself what if Spartacus had not gotten screwed over by those pirates and made it to Sicily? He had a pretty good sized army even after it got reduced thanks to Crixus and his little adventure.

    Sicily had a huge slave population working in the mines and in the grain fields. He wouldn't have had to assault that big wall the Romans built (which cost him 2/3s of his forces) nor would he have to worry about being starved out. It would have been awesome (and a real happy ending) if he had made Sicily into its own island nation and sat on a throne constructed out of the standards of roman legions and the swords of its of soldiers.

    But at best final victory would be in doubt after all two slave rebellions had already been put down in Sicily and Rome wouldn't have let something as important as Sicily go easily. They would have sent EVERYTHING against him. Could Spartacus have prevailed? I would like to think so but I kinda doubt it.

  • #2
    More importantly Rome could not survive without slave labour to work the farms that fed it. To allow a slave revolt to succeed would not have been tolerated for fear that it would inspire others.

    Spartacus's initial success was because Crassus was not a competent general compared to Pompey or Caesar one or both of whom would have led an attack on Sicily
    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MarkV View Post
      More importantly Rome could not survive without slave labour to work the farms that fed it. To allow a slave revolt to succeed would not have been tolerated for fear that it would inspire others.
      I don't think Spartacus cared too much about what the Romans would "allow" him to do. And Spartacus has pretty much been inspiring people for the past 2000 years.

      Spartacus's initial success was because Crassus was not a competent general compared to Pompey or Caesar one or both of whom would have led an attack on Sicily
      Crassus was no Scipio Africaius, Marius or Cesaer but Spartacus wasn't against Crassus most of the time. Crassus didn't come into the picture until started marching back south.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Axis of Evil View Post
        I don't think Spartacus cared too much about what the Romans would "allow" him to do. And Spartacus has pretty much been inspiring people for the past 2000 years.



        Crassus was no Scipio Africaius, Marius or Cesaer but Spartacus wasn't against Crassus most of the time. Crassus didn't come into the picture until started marching back south.
        Doesn't matter a jot about what Spartacus cared the Romans couldn't afford to allow him to get away with it and they would pull out all the stops. He may have inspired people or not but there were no successful slave revolts during the Roman empire and indeed AFAIK no serious attempts at one after Spartacus went down.

        Crassus was ultimately in command even though initially it was his subordinates who came up against Spartacus
        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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        • #5
          It would mean Spartacus would have died in Sicily.

          He wasn't all that great a leader, or even their sole leader, and the gladiators were not the supermen depicted in the TV show.

          Rome would have put his head on a pike no matter where he ran to.

          Spartacus in reality was just one of several leaders, and the revolt was created by Rome's abuses, bad habits, poor planning, and as noted second-line leadership. After his revolt the Romans changed their methods, and that was that in terms of slave revolts.

          The reality of Spartacus is much less than fiction would portray it.
          Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
            It would mean Spartacus would have died in Sicily.

            He wasn't all that great a leader, or even their sole leader, and the gladiators were not the supermen depicted in the TV show.
            He did a pretty decent job even capturing multiple legionary eagles and stuff. That ain't no small feet!

            The gladiators weren't invincible but they were tough as nails. I would say they would easily be able to match or even surpass the very best Roman soldiers in combat.

            Rome would have put his head on a pike no matter where he ran to.

            Spartacus in reality was just one of several leaders, and the revolt was created by Rome's abuses, bad habits, poor planning, and as noted second-line leadership. After his revolt the Romans changed their methods, and that was that in terms of slave revolts.

            The reality of Spartacus is much less than fiction would portray it.
            He made Rome tremble. Like i said his betrayal by the pirates forced him into a frontal assault which cost him 2/3s of his troops. He was probably one of the greatest commanders ever.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Axis of Evil View Post
              He did a pretty decent job even capturing multiple legionary eagles and stuff. That ain't no small feet!

              The gladiators weren't invincible but they were tough as nails. I would say they would easily be able to match or even surpass the very best Roman soldiers in combat.
              Single combat possibly but history constantly shows that if you put soldiers up against warriors - no matter how tough the warriors nine times out of ten the soldiers win 'cause they're trained to fight as a unit
              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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              • #8
                As others have said Sparticus would have died Sicily.

                His only real hope would have been to have gone north into Gaul outside of the Empire.

                Rome would never have tolerated a slave army on its territory.
                "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Axis of Evil View Post
                  He did a pretty decent job even capturing multiple legionary eagles and stuff. That ain't no small feet!
                  When did he do that? He mostly fought ad hoc groups of militia and garrison units until cornered.

                  Originally posted by Axis of Evil View Post
                  The gladiators weren't invincible but they were tough as nails. I would say they would easily be able to match or even surpass the very best Roman soldiers in combat.
                  Don't be silly-they ended up as slaves. They were expendable.

                  The Roman legion was built upon discipline and formation; they did not fight as individuals, but as a formation. The reason the rebellion went as far as it did was because the Legions were on the borders, so all the slaves faced were second-line troops.

                  In the end the gladiators surrendered and were crucified.

                  Originally posted by Axis of Evil View Post
                  He made Rome tremble. Like i said his betrayal by the pirates forced him into a frontal assault which cost him 2/3s of his troops. He was probably one of the greatest commanders ever.
                  He did upset Rome, that is true. They changed their entire military deployments, and they took slave-handling to a higher level of security. Never again did they have a uprising of this sort.

                  A great commander? Hardly. One of three commanders, and an indecisive one. When faced with a land route home, he choked, turned around, and marched the length of Italy to get a shorter sea route.

                  You're letting a lot of romance and fiction color a barbarian whose battle record was mediocre at best. Until the end, he never faced a competent Roman general, and he never faced a great one.
                  Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                  • #10
                    Oh... I see, you guys are talking about the fiction.

                    In reality, Spartacus's "army" acquired a taste for pillage. They were in north Italy with a path open to them all the way into the Balkans, but (much to the chagrin of Spartacus) they wanted to go back and have another go at it.

                    I think the smart ones headed for the Alps, and Spartacus must have known that there was a price on his head. The only safe place for him was in the midst of his army.
                    Too bad for him.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
                      Oh... I see, you guys are talking about the fiction.

                      In reality, Spartacus's "army" acquired a taste for pillage. They were in north Italy with a path open to them all the way into the Balkans, but (much to the chagrin of Spartacus) they wanted to go back and have another go at it.

                      I think the smart ones headed for the Alps, and Spartacus must have known that there was a price on his head. The only safe place for him was in the midst of his army.
                      Too bad for him.
                      A good assessment.
                      Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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