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  • Best Commanders for Invasions

    Need some advice. As some of you know I've written a few books about an alternate history were the Soviets invade Western Europe in 1946.

    Well its time for the US to strike back and I'm planning on a series of amphibious landings. I need the best combination of commanders for each. Their goal is to move and move fast to cut off the soviet supply lines then dig in and take on all comers. They have to be aggressive and good on defense Bastone style.

    The actual invasions are in such unlikely places that they should be almost unopposed but then the **** will hit the fan. The invasions will be in a cascading manner as the Red Army reacts to the initial threat.

    One more thing ... the Soviets are low on fuel due to an all out bombing campaign including 4 nukes on the Baku area. They have a stock pile of oil but not unlimited amounts.

    Each invasion needs an Army Commander and at least one aggressive and proven corps commander. Here are my choices and I seek advice and guidance on my choices...

    Invasion One - Trieste - Army commander - Walton Walker - Lead Corps - Troy Middleton. Objective to form a line from Trieste to Vienna.

    Landing Two - Beirut - Army - Oscar Griswold - Lead Corps - Leonard Gerow. Objective to cut off the Red Armies assaulting the Suez Canal and Kuwait

    Landing Three - Gdansk - Army - Mathew Ridgeway - Lead Corps - Charles Corlett (This includes taking Copenhagen by airborne assault). Objective to form a line from Gdansk to Vienna

    Landing Four - Taupse after forcing the Turkish straights - Army - Lucian Truscott - Lead Corps - Terry Allen. Objective to cut off the Soviet relief forces in the Caucus region and occupy the oil production facilities in the area.

    Have fun and thank you in advance
    www.wwiii1946.blogspot.com
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...pf_rd_i=507846

  • #2
    Just avoid Major Smuck, or rather you can use him as the namesake of a very bad marine officer...

    True person in WW2 who cocked up a invasion and showed up two hours late on the bridgehead. Then blamed his subordinates...
    Credo quia absurdum.


    Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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    • #3
      how would you propose that a much expanded US military and manpower base would work within the US political/social system? How would the political will be harnessed?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by hairog View Post
        ...

        Invasion One - Trieste - Army commander - Walton Walker - Lead Corps - Troy Middleton. Objective to form a line from Trieste to Vienna.

        Landing Two - Beirut - Army - Oscar Griswold - Lead Corps - Leonard Gerow. Objective to cut off the Red Armies assaulting the Suez Canal and Kuwait

        Landing Three - Gdansk - Army - Mathew Ridgeway - Lead Corps - Charles Corlett (This includes taking Copenhagen by airborne assault). Objective to form a line from Gdansk to Vienna

        Landing Four - Taupse after forcing the Turkish straights - Army - Lucian Truscott - Lead Corps - Terry Allen. Objective to cut off the Soviet relief forces in the Caucus region and occupy the oil production facilities in the area.

        Have fun and thank you in advance
        A lot of those locations are dead ends in terms of transportation & general strategy. Are you familar with the 'Drop Shot' plans? They were not written until 1948-49, but their basis was fairly valid in 1946 or 1947.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
          Just avoid Major Smuck, or rather you can use him as the namesake of a very bad marine officer...

          True person in WW2 who cocked up a invasion and showed up two hours late on the bridgehead. Then blamed his subordinates...
          Details? There was a Major Donald M. Schmuck, commanding a company in the 3d Marines. At Torokina IIRC.

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          • #6
            Trieste and Gdansk are mighty far up restricted waterways. Minefields around Denmark and Taranto could shut out any fleets. Any invasion in the Caucasus will run into severe supply problems.

            It may be far easier to land near Vladivostock and take the Soviet Far East away from them. The Soviets would have to transport across Siberia to hit any invaders. From there you could take away Manchuria from the Soviets as well.

            Most Naval Amphibious Commanders would do well again. I think the best in the ETO was Hewitt. You can also use Marine Corps units in the Far East.

            Pruitt
            Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

            Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

            by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
              A lot of those locations are dead ends in terms of transportation & general strategy. Are you familar with the 'Drop Shot' plans? They were not written until 1948-49, but their basis was fairly valid in 1946 or 1947.
              Drop Shot is not applicable. The Soviets have already invaded and negated our strategic bombing forces with early SAMs. The plan is to string them out and then cut them off. Here is a map of the situation.



              I'm not asking to discuss the situation. I'm looking for opinions on who would be the best commanders for the tasks.

              And yes I know NATO did not exist until... and all the other comments that are sure to follow.
              www.wwiii1946.blogspot.com
              http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...pf_rd_i=507846

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by hairog View Post
                Drop Shot is not applicable. The Soviets have already invaded and negated our strategic bombing forces with early SAMs. The plan is to string them out and then cut them off. Here is a map of the situation. ...
                Oh, sorry. What early SAM existed in 1946-47.

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                • #9
                  I really don't want or have the time to go over the whole story here. You can get most of it at my blog

                  www.wwiii1946.blogspot.com or

                  Buy the book or there was a long drawn out thread in these forums as well.
                  www.wwiii1946.blogspot.com
                  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...pf_rd_i=507846

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                  • #10
                    I won't argue over your choices as to location, stupid as they may be but, to answer your question you should go to the experts:

                    Merritt Edson
                    Holland Smith
                    Alexander Vandergrift

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                    • #11
                      What did Gerow do to get demoted?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                        I won't argue over your choices as to location, stupid as they may be but, to answer your question you should go to the experts:

                        Merritt Edson
                        Holland Smith
                        Alexander Vandergrift
                        Thank you for going along with the scenario T.A..

                        Edson never made is past Division command at this point. Is he really a good choice at this time in his career? What position would you put him in?

                        Holland Smith was a little too controversial. That's why he didn't get Okinawa.

                        Alexander Vandergrift was already Commandant of the Marine Corps. I don't think a demotion was in order nor wanted.
                        www.wwiii1946.blogspot.com
                        http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...pf_rd_i=507846

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Aber View Post
                          What did Gerow do to get demoted?
                          I wanted him as a Field Commander. The speed and leadership of the initial landing and push inland is vital to success.

                          "Both Eisenhower and Bradley held Gerow in high regard and ranked him as one of the top U.S. field commanders of World War II."

                          I just thought he would be one of the best to take it to the enemy at the pointy end of the spear. He was given the 15th Army at the end of the war as a reward I believe. Kind of a thank you gift. It never saw real combat and he was not tested as an army commander.
                          Last edited by hairog; 08 Jun 15, 09:22.
                          www.wwiii1946.blogspot.com
                          http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...pf_rd_i=507846

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by hairog View Post
                            Thank you for going along with the scenario T.A..

                            Edson never made is past Division command at this point. Is he really a good choice at this time in his career? What position would you put him in?

                            Holland Smith was a little too controversial. That's why he didn't get Okinawa.

                            Alexander Vandergrift was already Commandant of the Marine Corps. I don't think a demotion was in order nor wanted.
                            Edson on the ground as part of the invasion force, Smith in overall command... even if controversial, he was good, and Vandergrift as one of the principles that helped plan the operation and decide on its location.

                            So, you have a General on the ground, one out on the ships running the show, and one at higher headquarters who helped select and plan the operation.
                            The Marines are also more likely to be used than the Army for an amphibious invasion. The only reason they weren't used in Europe in WW 2 was they entirety of the Corps (less some small units) was in the Pacific.

                            An interesting note, the USMC did have about 200 men involved in the landings in Normandy and they used LVT amtracks to get ashore, the only ones present at the US landings...

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by hairog View Post

                              Landing Three - Gdansk - Army - Mathew Ridgeway - Lead Corps - Charles Corlett (This includes taking Copenhagen by airborne assault). Objective to form a line from Gdansk to Vienna
                              Ridgeway demonstrated great competence in Korea. There is no way he'd accept such a stupid operation. It is logistically un supportable. They'd have to clear Denmark first and having cleared Denmark, why bother with Gdansk?

                              It would be much saner to have this landing in Denmark/Northern Germany/ Holland whereupon the allies seize the ports of Hamburg, Kiel and Wilhemshaven. From there they could realistically support a drive across Germany to Vienna.

                              The allies did not conduct an invasion outside the range of tactical aircover in Europe. Although the USN should probably have the ability to bring 2500 to 3000 advanced combat aircraft anywhere in the world by this point.

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