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3 North American prehistoric mammals survive

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  • Pruitt
    replied
    The Paleo-Indians probably killed off what was left of the Cave Bears, Lions and Cheetahs in North America. This still left the Puma, Jaguar, and various Wolves. My question is whether they had to face the giant terror birds from South America. They did not die out until around 15,000 years ago. This puts them here with the Paleo-Indians.

    Pruitt

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  • DARKPLACE
    replied
    surely if larger herbivores survive in the wild some of the larger predators will as well? This isn't a good thing. Some of them were meat mountains with teeth.

    Leave a comment:


  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Delenda estRoma View Post
    Well according to the article not only is the book highly speculative (far beyond the usual amount) he has outright fiction in it. It also seems few scientists or historians agree with him.
    HI DER:
    The book is an interesting read as a novel. Technically, the route may have been possible during the Roman warm period.

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  • Delenda estRoma
    replied
    Well according to the article not only is the book highly speculative (far beyond the usual amount) he has outright fiction in it. It also seems few scientists or historians agree with him.

    Leave a comment:


  • marktwain
    replied
    actually- you could be right . Farley Mowatt in the Farfarers claims that the Jacakatars' came form Britain to Newfoundland long before the Vikings.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Farfarers

    Leave a comment:


  • Pruitt
    replied
    I believe there were a number of Japanese fishermen that ended up on the West Coast as well. Storms and ocean drift could have taken them there. They did a DNA study on the Haida a while back and found there was a Mitichondria gene marker from Taiwan in the results!

    I find it interesting to read this kind of stuff. I once used to be more dogmatic and certain what had to have happened. Now I just lay it out there and those who want to can check it out. One of the problems is the write us in South America are in Spanish or Portuguese. How many Americans read these languages?

    Yes there is some interesting DNA studies out there that indicate the Chinese went across the Pacific.

    Pruitt

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  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
    Dave, you are aware that Y DNA Haplogroups for Europeans also came from the same areas of Western Asia that the Amerinds have been traced back to? That is why you can't really use Y to trace back Amerind Tribes. The problem with using DNA gene markers is we have only a small sample to work with and there may well have been populations with gene markers we have not found yet. These Altaic MTA gene markers are something I will have to study. It is possible they traveled WEST as well as East.

    While you can be a wizard with maps and charts, there are other maps out there that show the Ice Pack stretching to the South of Iceland and the Ice reaches from North America to Europe.

    Pruitt
    Hi Pruitt:
    There is very strong evidence of Chinese travel to the 'land of Fu Sang' before the Vikings.

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/histor...952765/?no-ist

    European appearing skulls in North America, pre Columbian, may likely have been Jomon people.

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  • grishnak
    replied
    UK and Ireland

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  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Snowygerry View Post
    Well gold was the original "draw" - from about 1545 onward silver became the main interest.

    Not on the islands so much, but along the coastlines of south and central America.

    The original method was to simply impose quota on the natives and let them sort it out, with no natives some other method would have to be found.

    Of course with no natives the question does arise how the colonists would know/find the location of the deposits, as you correctly point out.



    That sounds plausible yes.[B

    Do we have historical examples of Europeans landing on a large *unpopulated* landmass ?

    /B]


    The Norse in Greenland /Iceland- and Palestine before the creation of Israel

    Possibly the Falklands- although the Argentinians claim they were 'there, first'...

    the Azores....

    Leave a comment:


  • The Doctor
    replied
    Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
    Dave you say there is no evidence of influx of European gene markers, but this overlooks the Y Chromosome R1. It is the second largest of Y Chromosomes found in Amerind populations and the experts can't say for sure how it got to North America.

    I am R1b and I bet you are an R as well.

    Pruitt
    It's the same pathway as mitochondrial DNA X...

    Leave a comment:


  • Pruitt
    replied
    Dave you say there is no evidence of influx of European gene markers, but this overlooks the Y Chromosome R1. It is the second largest of Y Chromosomes found in Amerind populations and the experts can't say for sure how it got to North America.

    I am R1b and I bet you are an R as well.

    Pruitt

    Leave a comment:


  • The Doctor
    replied
    Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
    Certainly a lot of the evidence points to Beringia,
    ALL of the evidence points to Beringia.

    Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
    but there is more evidence coming in that suggests influx of people from other places. Archaeologists dug into a cave in Brazil and found African type skeletons from a period before the Amerinds crossed the ice sheets. There is a chain of seamounts between Brazil and Africa that would have been islands during the ice age that could have been used as stops on a migration across the Atlantic. All you need is leather boats to cross stretches of ocean. Ask St Brendan!

    As time goes along we will get more information and concoct new theories.

    Pruitt
    The "Luzia woman" was not of direct African origin.
    Her facial features include a narrow, oval cranium, projecting face and pronounced chin, strikingly dissimilar to most native Americans and their indigenous Siberian forebears. Anthropologists have variously described Luzia's features as resembling those of Africans, Indigenous Australians, Melanesians and the Negritos of Southeast Asia. Walter Neves, an anthropologist at the University of São Paulo, suggests that Luzia's features most strongly resemble those of Australian Aboriginal peoples. Richard Neave of Manchester University, who undertook a facial reconstruction of Luzia (see the photograph above), stated that "I personally would stick my neck out and say it is conclusive support for his [Neve's] findings and demonstrates without any doubt at all" that Luzia was not closely related to Siberian peoples.[3]

    Neves and other Brazilian anthropologists have theorized that Luzia's Paleo-Indian predecessors lived in South East Asia for tens of thousands of years, after migrating from Africa, and began arriving in the New World, as early as 15,000 years ago. Some anthropologists have hypothesized that Paleo-Indians migrated along the coast of East Asia and Beringia in small watercraft, before or during the last Ice Age.

    Neves' conclusions have been challenged by research done by anthropologists Rolando Gonzalez-Jose, Frank Williams and William Armelagos who have shown in their studies that the cranio-facial variability could just be due to genetic drift and other factors affecting cranio-facial plasticity in Native Americans.[4][5][6]

    It had been hypotehsized that Luiza and other Paleo-Indians arrived in the Americas about 3,000 years earlier than Amerindians from Siberia, However, the most recent radiometric dating provides an age of 10,300 (+/-60) years for Luiza. This coupled with the fact that her cranial features could simply be due to genetic drift, casts doubt on an earlier migration of Paleo-Indians from Southeast Asia via Beringia.

    There is no evidence of migrations into the Americas via any route other than Beringia.

    There is evidence of contact between Polynesians and Pre-Columbian Amerindians of South America. However, there is no evidence that Polynesians established settlements.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pruitt
    replied
    Certainly a lot of the evidence points to Beringia, but there is more evidence coming in that suggests influx of people from other places. Archaeologists dug into a cave in Brazil and found African type skeletons from a period before the Amerinds crossed the ice sheets. There is a chain of seamounts between Brazil and Africa that would have been islands during the ice age that could have been used as stops on a migration across the Atlantic. All you need is leather boats to cross stretches of ocean. Ask St Brendan!

    As time goes along we will get more information and concoct new theories.

    Pruitt

    Leave a comment:


  • The Doctor
    replied
    At the last glacial maximum, Beringia was above sea level and ice-free: An easy route for animal and human migrations into the Americas...



    The route from Europe required crossing 2-3 continental ice sheets and about 1,000 miles of sea ice.


    The continental ice sheets were literally mountain ranged of ice. The Laurentide ice sheet was taller than the Rocky Mountains...



    All of the archaeological, DNA and geological evidence points to Beringia.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Doctor
    replied
    Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
    Dave, you are aware that Y DNA Haplogroups for Europeans also came from the same areas of Western Asia that the Amerinds have been traced back to? That is why you can't really use Y to trace back Amerind Tribes. The problem with using DNA gene markers is we have only a small sample to work with and there may well have been populations with gene markers we have not found yet. These Altaic MTA gene markers are something I will have to study. It is possible they traveled WEST as well as East.
    There is simply no evidence to support the Solutrean hypothesis. None, nada, zero-point-zero...



    Originally posted by Pruitt
    While you can be a wizard with maps and charts, there are other maps out there that show the Ice Pack stretching to the South of Iceland and the Ice reaches from North America to Europe.

    Pruitt
    Sea ice (ice pack) and continental ice sheets are two different things.

    The Quaternary glacial maxima are clearly defined.

    Leave a comment:

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