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August 1990: Saddam rolls on in to Saudi Arabia

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  • August 1990: Saddam rolls on in to Saudi Arabia

    Saddam Hussein invades Kuwait. But he doesn't stop there: he continues on in to Saudi Arabia.

    The Iraqi army, with a core of battle-hardened veterans from the just-finished Iran-Iraq war, although paltry by world standards, is able to brush aside the even more paltry Saudis, despite their latest equipment.

    When word gets out that King Fahd & the Saudi Royal family has fled to France, resistance collapses.

    Jordan, Lebanon and Israel, with large Palestinan pro-Saddam minorities, are destabilised, Hussein being viewed as some kind of Islamic Messiah/5th Imam. Even the Iranians look on in admiration.

    The conquest of the Saudi & Kuwaiti oil fields is so quick, and with the prospect of 30% of the world's oil being destroyed in the event of a US-led invasion, Bush weighs a nuclear decapitation of Saddam in Baghdad. But Bush is no Reagan and backs off.

    Gloating over his conquest, Hussein loses interest in firing Scuds on Israel.

    But the US quickly plots to use Israel, the only ones who could get away with it and refocus the Arab world at the same time, as a tool to take out Saddam with a 'false flag' operation. Israeli micro and mini nukes get to be used. The world gets to see what an above-ground 0.1 kT atom bomb explosion looks like.


  • #2
    I'd say they'd get maybe 200 miles in and stall like they did in Iran. The US would still have dropped the 82nd Airborne in and used them as blocking troops to hold the Iraqi's until reinforcements could arrive.



    This puts the Iraqi's maybe half way to Riyadh and at war with all the Gulf States and a coalition of Western nations.
    Given the ineptitude of the Iraqi military and its generally lethargic nature the 82nd is enough to bring a halt to the advance. Throw in US and British special forces and Western air power and the Iraqi advance grinds to a halt as columns are shot to pieces and the rear areas are in semi-chaos.

    The Coalition reinforces and you get a more spectacular Desert Storm one where the Iraqi military is mostly destroyed outside Iraq.

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    • #3
      Longer suppply lines, less concentration of forces, less cover.

      The highway of death would look like a picnic compared to what would happen here.
      Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

      That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

      Comment


      • #4
        So does that mean that the Iraqi's are vindicated in stopping Kuwait side drilling into it's sovereign oilfields that started it all.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Rojik View Post
          Longer suppply lines, less concentration of forces, less cover.

          The highway of death would look like a picnic compared to what would happen here.
          That would be the hope, but look at that map again.
          Iraq secured Kuwait in a matter of hours, it was all over in less than half a day. It does not take long to cover the distances shown, there is nothing to slow you down north and east of Ryadh. And that stretch of coast from the UAE to Kuwait- that is where all the oil is.
          Its also where all the de-salinization plants are that generate most of the region's water.
          The important stuff is all within reach, even to such a ponderous and war-weary army.

          And how would you stop them?
          Looks like it all comes down to airpower. And that was where our best advantage was.... but you need bases for airpower.
          We used KKMC and other pre-prepared bases funded by the Saudis and designed to NATO specs * , but what if Iraq pulled a Pearl Harbor on them as the very first move?

          The Saudi Military was more like a Country Club with some really cool RVs, a place to send the trust-babies for a while and hope they grew up a little there, for the most part. If they were hit hard enough w/o warning (Kuwait came as a hell of a surprise) most of them could have folded up like a cheap chair.

          And if they did, you are looking at Saddam holding a hell of a lot of cards, within 48 hours, including those bases.

          ANyone recall how long it took for our first pair of carriers to get there?

          * which brings us to the reason we went all-out to get Kuwait out of Saddam's hands;
          During the Cold War, Kuwait and S.A. were the only 2 nations in that region that were on our side all through it, and would have stepped up if the Balloon Went Up, as we used to say.
          If they were going to be there for us in the event of war with the USSR, there was no way we weren't going to be there for them to fend off some local warlord.
          Not to mention the U.K., France, Egypt, and about a dozen other countries, or more if you include other forms of support.
          "Why is the Rum gone?"

          -Captain Jack

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          • #6
            Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
            That would be the hope, but look at that map again.
            Iraq secured Kuwait in a matter of hours, it was all over in less than half a day. It does not take long to cover the distances shown, there is nothing to slow you down north and east of Ryadh. And that stretch of coast from the UAE to Kuwait- that is where all the oil is.
            Its also where all the de-salinization plants are that generate most of the region's water.
            The important stuff is all within reach, even to such a ponderous and war-weary army.

            And how would you stop them?
            Looks like it all comes down to airpower. And that was where our best advantage was.... but you need bases for airpower.
            We used KKMC and other pre-prepared bases funded by the Saudis and designed to NATO specs * , but what if Iraq pulled a Pearl Harbor on them as the very first move?

            The Saudi Military was more like a Country Club with some really cool RVs, a place to send the trust-babies for a while and hope they grew up a little there, for the most part. If they were hit hard enough w/o warning (Kuwait came as a hell of a surprise) most of them could have folded up like a cheap chair.

            And if they did, you are looking at Saddam holding a hell of a lot of cards, within 48 hours, including those bases.

            ANyone recall how long it took for our first pair of carriers to get there?

            * which brings us to the reason we went all-out to get Kuwait out of Saddam's hands;
            During the Cold War, Kuwait and S.A. were the only 2 nations in that region that were on our side all through it, and would have stepped up if the Balloon Went Up, as we used to say.
            If they were going to be there for us in the event of war with the USSR, there was no way we weren't going to be there for them to fend off some local warlord.
            Not to mention the U.K., France, Egypt, and about a dozen other countries, or more if you include other forms of support.
            They could take it all but they would never be able to supply the troops. And mid air refuelling, carrier based ac, commando attacks and long range bombers would be easily interdict supply lines, and I'm not sure even that would be needed. You must know just how much tail is needed to keep an armoured division running, and how abrasive on men and equipment desert warfare is. And would Iraq really want to go on a death ride into the Arabian peninsula while a very hostile Iran sat next door? That's not to say that Saddam was a sensible leader, just that if he had have ordered such a thing then it would have ended very, very badly, and enemy action would have only played some part in that.
            Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

            That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

            Comment


            • #7
              Iran wasn't in very good shape either after that 8-year war.
              And, odddly enough, Iraqi Aircraft were fleeing to Iran, remember that?

              I think Iran would have loved to sit back and watch Iraq tearing up those Gulf States.

              And, there is one diabolical way they could have fended off airstrikes; they won't have to carry much dynamite with them to cook-off a few oil-wells every time our planes appear, or a water-treatment plant.
              How long before you think the Sheiks are begging for terms, and screaming at us to just go away?
              "Why is the Rum gone?"

              -Captain Jack

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
                Iran wasn't in very good shape either after that 8-year war.
                And, odddly enough, Iraqi Aircraft were fleeing to Iran, remember that?

                I think Iran would have loved to sit back and watch Iraq tearing up those Gulf States.

                And, there is one diabolical way they could have fended off airstrikes; they won't have to carry much dynamite with them to cook-off a few oil-wells every time our planes appear, or a water-treatment plant.
                How long before you think the Sheiks are begging for terms, and screaming at us to just go away?
                I remember. I thought it bizarre at the time and still scratch my head over it. But the point still remains: sending an army into a hostile desert land requires a very strong logistical arm to support it. Iraq didn't have that. How many tonnes of food, fuel, spare parts and all the other bits and pieces an army needs to function would they need a day? And what real hope did they have of supplying them? Without getting into the details I'm going to guess i) lots and ii) no hope at all.

                No decent roads, no rail, no command of the skies and a nasty environment. If you were on the Iraqi staff would you advise such a thing?
                Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

                That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Iraq only needs to secure the coast to put themselves in the best negotiating position, no need to push across the desert, KSA would be about securing their ownership of Kuwait by holding the export of Saudi oil hostage. It would eventually fail in the manner the Kuwait occupation did, it would be much more difficult for the UN forces though. It is the only thing that really makes sense, subjugation of Kuwait was more likely than KSA, I don't think Saddam Hussein would even have considered that a possible reality.
                  Кто там?
                  Это я - Почтальон Печкин!
                  Tunis is a Carthigenian city!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If anyone wants the nightmare version of this, look up the old Paul Erdman novel 'The Crash of 79'. Written in the mid 1970s Erdman proposes the Shah of Iran seizes the Iraqi oil fields of the Shat al Arab estuary, the Kuwati territory, and the Saudi fields in one swift coup de main aided by some low yeild atomic weapons. The resulting oil shock crashes the global economy leaving the 1980s in a economic depression worse than that of the 1930s.

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