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What if the Civil War's Union Blockade was raised by the British?

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  • What if the Civil War's Union Blockade was raised by the British?

    What would the effect be upon the Southern states if the American blockade was suddenly raised and countless shiploads of Southern cotton, sugar and etc. could have been sent to Europe?
    "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

  • #2
    The opening of the Blockade could not interfere with the Union's use of Riverine warships. The Mississippi and other rivers would still be lost. Once New Orleans is taken, most of the cotton and sugar would still be stopped.

    Pruitt
    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
      The opening of the Blockade could not interfere with the Union's use of Riverine warships. The Mississippi and other rivers would still be lost. Once New Orleans is taken, most of the cotton and sugar would still be stopped.

      Pruitt
      There were millions of tons of baled cotton awaiting shipment to Europe at a host of other Southern seaports stretching from Texas to Virginia.
      "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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      • #4
        Originally posted by johnbryan View Post
        There were millions of tons of baled cotton awaiting shipment to Europe at a host of other Southern seaports stretching from Texas to Virginia.
        What does that have to do with NO being opened? Once opened NO well have to be held open and as Pru stated it, sort of a so what. The river was still under Union control.
        "Ask not what your country can do for you"

        Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

        you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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        • #5
          John,

          The South did not have n extensive rail system. Many of the rail lines went to a river. Example is a line that went from about Tyler, Texas to Shreveport. The other rail in Texas went from Galveston to where Houston is today. Many other rail lines went to the Mississippi or another major river. One reason they cleared out lines in South Louisiana and from Monroe to the Mississippi is so they would not have to depend on seasonal rivers. It just so happened that the rails had not been aid yet.

          Once control of the Mississippi was interrupted and/or lost most of those bales of cotton had no way to the sea.

          Pruitt
          Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

          Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

          by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

          Comment


          • #6
            Would the French be taking part in this party? Otherwise it may be difficult to lift the blockade - whilst New Orleans would seem to remain a problem either way.
            If goods out of the CSA is the trouble, would there be any other ports in the South to which any exports could be directed, say, in Texas?
            It also seems one in South Carolina, Port Royal, was quite handy to establishing and maintaining the Union blockade. If blockade busting was a priority, would/could this port be targeted by CSA forces? would there be any spare to do it with?
            ------
            'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

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            • #7
              There was a wagon road going South in Texas to Mexico that carried cotton. I would say this was organized by Kirby Smith to get munitions and supplies into Texas. Most civilians could not afford to hire a wagon and pay someone to take the trip. During the Red River campaign, lots of cotton was seized along the Red. Civilians had been hoarding it in anticipation of Yankee cotton buyers coming by. Most was either burned, or seized by the US Navy or Banks' Army. Both armies had been allowing these Yankee cotton buyers to pass through the lines to buy cotton. This paid for some medicine and valuable consumer goods to get through.

              Pruitt
              Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

              Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

              by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

              Comment


              • #8
                So, the British go to war with the Union / US? I could see the US unleashing a fleet of commerce raiders on Britain in short order. The CSA ones did major damage to the US merchant fleet. Several times their number would have had serious economic effects on Britain.

                The US did threaten such an action historically if Britain jumped into the war. The extreme of this was the Wampanoag class of frigates. While these were more a paper threat than a real one at the time Britain took them seriously enough to build the reply class Shah unarmored iron frigates.

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                • #9
                  Indeed, the experience of the Alabama stalked tall in the RUSI discussions of the period. The work of JCR Colomb is littered with references to the potential damage a commerce raiding fleet could do. Whilst Britain was better prepared for such than the Union was, with the dispositions of its Naval Squadrons and colonial assets, the threat remained.
                  ------
                  'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

                  If you have questions about the forum please check the FAQ/Rules

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
                    John,

                    The South did not have n extensive rail system. Many of the rail lines went to a river. Example is a line that went from about Tyler, Texas to Shreveport. The other rail in Texas went from Galveston to where Houston is today. Many other rail lines went to the Mississippi or another major river. One reason they cleared out lines in South Louisiana and from Monroe to the Mississippi is so they would not have to depend on seasonal rivers. It just so happened that the rails had not been aid yet.

                    Once control of the Mississippi was interrupted and/or lost most of those bales of cotton had no way to the sea.

                    Pruitt
                    Read General Sherman's message to President Lincoln of December 1864 where he details all the Confederate ordinance and contraband cotton his troops seized when they took Savannah Georgia after making the state "howl.".
                    "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by johnbryan View Post
                      Read General Sherman's message to President Lincoln of December 1864 where he details all the Confederate ordinance and contraband cotton his troops seized when they took Savannah Georgia after making the state "howl.".
                      The same could be said about the southern seaports of Mobile, Wilmington, Charleston and etc. There were warehouses filled with cotton awaiting shipment to Europe.
                      "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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                      • #12
                        Well, they had to put it somewhere! Mobile and the East Coast were the last areas to be taken by the Union Army. Certainly some ships got in and out, but the bulk of the crops did not get out. Someone was selling to the New England mills after all!

                        Pruitt
                        Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                        Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                        by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

                        Comment

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