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If The Roman Empire Never Split...

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  • If The Roman Empire Never Split...

    What do you guys think would have happened if the Roman Empire never split... That there was a strong leader who organised government into a more decentralised system in which Rome was simply the "first city among equals" in its Empire and that troops did not necessarily need to come with the support of Rome but could be supported by local governors/kings etc?

  • #2
    Which of the splits do you mean? Do you mean the final one?
    Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

    That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

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    • #3
      Yea, Rome split quite a few times. Britian, Gaul, Iberia, they all broke off at one point or another. it got split into 2 and 4 parts multiple times.

      It's amazing it hung together as long as it did.

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      • #4
        Why don't we go with the go old standard where the east and west split between Rome and Constantinople with the borderrunning through Dalmatia,...circa 395 AD.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Th...27s_empire.png

        Wukong?

        Why don't you give us your view of how a unified empire would have been different and then others can move the discussion forward from there.
        The Purist

        Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

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        • #5
          It split because it was just too big for one man (and senate) to adequately administer within the technology of the day.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by broderickwells View Post
            It split because it was just too big for one man (and senate) to adequately administer within the technology of the day.
            It did pretty well while everyone believed in it. Until about 200 AD, things went well enough.

            Then people started sinking into corruption and cynicism, and the West was used up and left to wither on the vine.
            Yeah, I know that's overly simplistic, but that's how it worked out in the end.
            "Why is the Rum gone?"

            -Captain Jack

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            • #7
              Originally posted by broderickwells View Post
              It split because it was just too big for one man (and senate) to adequately administer within the technology of the day.
              There was also a separation between the Latin west and the Greek east. IMO once you move past the 5th Century it was no longer the Eastern Roman Empire but rather the Byzantine Empire because its Greek culture had completely displaced most of what truly made it Roman; case in point Justinian was the last emperor whose primary language was Latin. It is true that the region of modern Romania still spoke Latin as a primary language, but it was the exception rather that the rule.
              Give me a fast ship and the wind at my back for I intend to sail in harms way! (John Paul Jones)

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              Hard core! Old School! Deal with it!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Exorcist View Post
                It did pretty well while everyone believed in it. Until about 200 AD, things went well enough.

                Then people started sinking into corruption and cynicism, and the West was used up and left to wither on the vine.
                Yeah, I know that's overly simplistic, but that's how it worked out in the end.
                The era of plagues starting with Galen had a huge part in this. From 165-180 as many as 5 million people died of either small pox or measles. This is roughly 1 in 6 or 7 persons in the Empire and is noted as having an inordinate impact in Italy and Gaul crushing the social fabric there. This pandemic lead to the terminal collapse of the West the and the Justinian plague had much the same effect in the east a few hundred years later. Even hundreds of years after the plague of Justinian the Macedonian empires were still trying to repopulate Anatollia.

                Other systemic problems also exist in the Empire. Wealth was based on influence and that was based on land. With much of the land in the west owned by the senatorial class in massive often tax exempt latifundia land for the up and comers had to come from the Imperial principates and over time this bankrupted the imperial government even as the Empire itself was bursting with wealth.

                This crippled the army which was further hurt by equalizing the pay between a legionnaire and auxiliary enlistee which crippled recruitment forcing a reliance on mercs and tribal allies. Now add in religious schism and inept emperors....

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                • #9
                  I think we did this once before, with Wolery.

                  Okay, let's pick a year between 300-400AD and a man - presumably an Emperor - and outline the differences needed from the OT.

                  As much as possible, let's see if we can limit the changes to directives our Man could push through, instead of saying 'no plague' - which would obviously help.

                  And when Wukong gets back with his target State of the Empire, we'll see if we can't match it. Basically let's explore how it could be done with hindsight instead of worrying about the fact that it wasn't.

                  I'll do mine when I get home

                  EDIT: Apparently I won't <_< Will attempt to find and copy across my response to Wolery.
                  Last edited by Khryses; 01 Jun 12, 20:21.
                  Captain Khryses, Silver Star Omnilift Wing

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