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Is WWIII in 1946 a Sound Theory?

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  • Originally posted by hairog View Post
    Read up a little on the Yak 3 at low level and in a turning fight. As the Spitfire designers attempted to match the Germans and US in Boom and Zoom they lost their incredible turning capabilities. They always could out maneuver the 109 and 190. I would suggest that they will have a very hard time if they try and match the Yak3 and even the Yak9 at low and mid-level.
    Not from my reading they won't.

    Got good reviews but the salient fact he brings out is that the RAF had the advantage in numbers almost constantly.That of course will not be the case here.
    No he doesn't. He brings out the fact that there were more fighters in Fighter Command than there were Me109s in the Luftwaffe units facing them. So your closing sentence is meaningless.

    How could they possibly get to the English coast? Especially with the unsinkable (according to TA) Royal Navy in the way.
    Oh come on, you've stacked the odds everywhere else so I'm sure you can create a large warship force (captured French warships, W. European barges and cargo ships etc. etc.)
    Signing out.

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    • I may have found hairog's missile guidance system - pigeons

      During World War II, Project Pigeon (later Project Orcon, for "organic control") was American behaviorist B.F. Skinner's attempt to develop a pigeon-guided missile.

      The control system involved a lens at the front of the missile projecting an image of the target to a screen inside, while a pigeon trained (by operant conditioning) to recognize the target pecked at it. As long as the pecks remained in the center of the screen, the missile would fly straight, but pecks off-center would cause the screen to tilt, which would then, via a connection to the missile's flight controls, cause the missile to change course.

      Although skeptical of the idea, the National Defense Research Committee nevertheless contributed $25,000 to the research. However, Skinner's plans to use pigeons in Pelican missiles was considered too eccentric and impractical; although he had some success with the training, he could not get his idea taken seriously. The program was canceled on October 8, 1944, because the military believed that "further prosecution of this project would seriously delay others which in the minds of the Division have more immediate promise of combat application."

      Project Pigeon was revived by the Navy in 1948 as "Project Orcon"; it was canceled in 1953 when electronic guidance systems' reliability was proven.

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      • As promised the next Bad Post Report was lodged for this thread. Permanently CLOSED- ACG STAFF
        Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

        "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

        What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

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