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Was there an allied ace that fought both the Japanese and Germans in the air?

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  • Was there an allied ace that fought both the Japanese and Germans in the air?

    I have alway been intrigued with thoughts like, how would have 'Pappy' Boyington done against the Focke Wulf's?
    Or, what if Ginger Rodgers would have been pitted against Zero's in Burma?
    So, you get the picture, I'm pretty shure that some American airmen did serve against both foes.
    Did any Brit/Commonwealt pilot do the same? I know british seafires were committed at Okinawa, they must have bagged some Japanese planes. Were they ex Spit pilots?
    So, dear fellows, I await your answers!
    (After d-day ofcourse).
    Attached Files
    27
    Supermarine Spitfire
    29.63%
    8
    Republic Thunderbolt
    7.41%
    2
    Vought Corsair
    7.41%
    2
    P 51 Mustang
    55.56%
    15
    "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

    If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

  • #2
    Re: Was there an allied ace that fought both the Japanese and Germans in the air?

    Originally posted by 17poundr

    Did any Brit/Commonwealt pilot do the same? I know british seafires were committed at Okinawa, they must have bagged some Japanese planes. Were they ex Spit pilots?
    So, dear fellows, I await your answers!
    (After d-day ofcourse).
    Seafire Pilots were Royal Navy or Royal Marines not Royal Air Force. I know Jimmy Dolittle fought againt the Japanese and Germans, but right off hand I don't know of any fighter pilots.

    Seafire


    Spitfire


    Cheers!


    :armed:
    Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

    "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

    What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

    Comment


    • #3
      John d. Landers shot down 6 planes flying P-40s in the PTO and 8.5 in the ETO flying P-51s

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by cpgor
        John d. Landers shot down 6 planes flying P-40s in the PTO and 8.5 in the ETO flying P-51s
        His P-51 was the much illustrated Big Beautiful Doll.

        Comment


        • #5
          George Preddy, flew in the PTO where he got credit for 2 damaged. Hit his stride in the ETO where he is credited with 26 victories. His personal plane was named Cripes A' Mighty he was hit by friendly ground fire and crashed to his death on Christmas Day 1944.

          Comment


          • #6
            An Aiman's extacy

            Here is a poem written by a Canadian spitfire pilot who died in the battle of britain.
            It is called: An airman's extacy


            Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
            And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
            Sunward I have climbed and joined the tumbling mirth
            Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things
            You have not dreamed of - wheeled and
            Soared and swung
            High in the sunlit silence. Hovering there,
            I've chased the shouting wind along,
            And flung
            My eager craft through footless halls of air.
            Up, up the long, delirious, burning blue
            I've topped the windswept heights with easy grace
            Where never lark, or even eagle flew.
            And, while with silent, lifting mind I've trod
            the high untrespassed sanctity of space,
            Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.
            Attached Files
            "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

            If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: An Aiman's extacy

              Originally posted by 17poundr
              Here is a poem written by a Canadian spitfire pilot who died in the battle of britain.
              It is called: An airman's extacy


              Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
              And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
              Sunward I have climbed and joined the tumbling mirth
              Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things
              You have not dreamed of - wheeled and
              Soared and swung
              High in the sunlit silence. Hovering there,
              I've chased the shouting wind along,
              And flung
              My eager craft through footless halls of air.
              Up, up the long, delirious, burning blue
              I've topped the windswept heights with easy grace
              Where never lark, or even eagle flew.
              And, while with silent, lifting mind I've trod
              the high untrespassed sanctity of space,
              Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.
              That is a classic and a Reagan favorite! Thanks for sharing it.

              Were there any guys who volunteered in the Eagle Squadron or Chenault's AVG that crossed over to a different theater of operations and achieved ace status?

              Brad
              "We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free."- Ronald Reagan at the D-Day Anniversary

              http://www.imagestation.com/picture/...7/fe0df62e.jpg

              Comment


              • #8
                MOH winner Jim Howard, the "One Man Airforce" was an ace in each of the Pacific and European Theaters. He fought with the AVG in the Pacific and won the only MOH given to a fighter pilot flying a P-51B in Europe. His Mustang called "Ding-Ho" has been depicted in many photos and even some old model decal sets.

                www.medalofhonor.com/WorldWarIIG-L.htm
                Lance W.

                Peace through superior firepower.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Lance Williams
                  MOH winner Jim Howard, the "One Man Airforce" was an ace in each of the Pacific and European Theaters. He fought with the AVG in the Pacific and won the only MOH given to a fighter pilot flying a P-51B in Europe. His Mustang called "Ding-Ho" has been depicted in many photos and even some old model decal sets.

                  www.medalofhonor.com/WorldWarIIG-L.htm
                  Thankyou for info, and especially the exellent site! One of the best about military history I have seen, so clear and informative and easy...:thumb:
                  "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

                  If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Great pics, guys.
                    I come here to discuss a piece of business with you and what are you gonna do? You're gonna tell me fairy tales? James Caan in the movie "Thief" ca 1981

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: An Aiman's extacy

                      Originally posted by 17poundr
                      Here is a poem written by a Canadian spitfire pilot who died in the battle of britain.
                      It is called: An airman's extacy


                      Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
                      And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
                      Sunward I have climbed and joined the tumbling mirth
                      Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things
                      You have not dreamed of - wheeled and
                      Soared and swung
                      High in the sunlit silence. Hovering there,
                      I've chased the shouting wind along,
                      And flung
                      My eager craft through footless halls of air.
                      Up, up the long, delirious, burning blue
                      I've topped the windswept heights with easy grace
                      Where never lark, or even eagle flew.
                      And, while with silent, lifting mind I've trod
                      the high untrespassed sanctity of space,
                      Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.
                      It's also called High Flight, written by an American serving with the RCAF. http://www.wpafb.af.mil/museum/history/prewwii/jgm.htm
                      "War is God's way of teaching Americans geography."
                      - Ambrose Bierce

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Re: An Aiman's extacy

                        Originally posted by Gen_Electric
                        It's also called High Flight, written by an American serving with the RCAF. http://www.wpafb.af.mil/museum/history/prewwii/jgm.htm
                        I'm so sorry, I read about him being in a Canadian squadron, or perhaps even got some falce info in a documentary in him being Canadian.
                        Do you know did he make it to the Eagle Squadrons? Or did he pass away before that developement?
                        My respects. mr Poundr
                        "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

                        If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I believe that the Eagle Squadron formed in late '39 early '40. They were togethr before my dad arrived in '40.
                          "We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free."- Ronald Reagan at the D-Day Anniversary

                          http://www.imagestation.com/picture/...7/fe0df62e.jpg

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 17poundr
                            Thankyou for info, and especially the exellent site! One of the best about military history I have seen, so clear and informative and easy...:thumb:
                            You're very welcome. I'm sure there are other examples. I know that if a pilot was shot down in Europe and was helped by the resistance he would not be allowed to fly in Europe again. Some of them must have been transfered to the Pacific.
                            Lance W.

                            Peace through superior firepower.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Come to think of it. Discounting the ace thing, VC-8 which captured the U-505 (while aboard the USS Guadalcanal) in 6/1944 was transferred aboard the USS Nehenta Bay in 2/1945 and took part in the Okinawa operations.
                              I come here to discuss a piece of business with you and what are you gonna do? You're gonna tell me fairy tales? James Caan in the movie "Thief" ca 1981

                              Comment

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