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The best general of WWII

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  • The best general of WWII

    who in your opinion is the best general of WWII whether he be german, american, russian, or if you believe the french, the british, the polish of the italians had good general name him and tell me why
    Hell was full, so I came back.

  • #2
    Excellent question! This will be the feature story of our Premiere issue which features Patton on the cover and asks whether he was the "Best General of all Time?" We certainly believe there will be lots of lively debate on this discusion board once the artcile breaks. Should be fascinating to hear all the different points of view.
    Publisher
    Armchair General Magazine
    Weider History Group

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    • #3
      By the way, based on your user name can we safely assume your vote would be for Rommel!? He would certainly be in my top 5.
      Publisher
      Armchair General Magazine
      Weider History Group

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      • #4
        Georgi Konstantinovich Zhukov (1896-1974)

        was the most outstanding general/marshall of WWII. At least 80% of the German casualties of WWII were met facing the Russians.

        He was however, quite ruthless and was known to accept great losses to achieve objectives.

        Being considered the best usually entails some degree of luck, because IMHO, had Hitler not interfered with Heinz Guderian in the East, this may have been a completely differing post.

        regards,
        swampy

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        • #5
          I do like rommel and i think that he was the best general of WWII but a close second would be Patton. You got to love the man.
          Hell was full, so I came back.

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          • #6
            Erich von Manstein 1887-1973

            His plan for an advance through the Ardennes in 1940 resulted in the defeat of the French Army and the expulsion of the British from the European continent.
            His masterful use of the maneuver warfare allowed his 56th Pz Corps to take the lead in AGN by advancing an incredible 360km in 4 days and capturing the bridges over the Dvina.
            In later years, he consistently outmaneuvered Soviet attempts to destroy AGS.
            At Zitadelle, his southern prong came very near victory through the massive Soviet defensive belts.
            Even at siege warfare, he had few equals; as is evidenced by his performance at Sevatopol.
            Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

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            • #7
              I vote for Patton. His troops liberated the town where my mother lived when she was young, Redon in Bretagne.
              Or I could choose Marshal Tito. He liberated Yugoslavia only with his own troops, without the help of the Russians or the Anglo-Saxons.

              LaPalice.
              Monsieur de La Palice est mort
              Mort devant Pavie.
              Un quart d'heure avant sa mort
              Il était encore en vie...

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              • #8
                Two of my favorits are mentioned:

                Manstein and Zhukov.

                A little bit more Manstein, because he has to plan without serious information on the enemy. Zhukov (and the whole Allied generals had the luxory knowing the enemy's intentions).
                a brain cell

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                • #9
                  von Manstein will probably be the least "argued" figure among all candidates here....

                  Zhukov.. hehe.. some1 (mostly Russian ... and secondly probably fins? ... like Sheik) hate him too much .... For me, well, he was the winner, what can I say?

                  Patton ... hmm... many would argue then ---- he seems just very bold .... but a good fighter makes a best general?

                  Erwin Rommel ... also my favor (E R .. ) .. but problem is many argued his success was in Africa when he merely commanded 3 div. .. hardly comparable to the eastern monster generals ... and later he was defeated in Normandy when he commanded more.

                  ...

                  Tito is a nice and innovative nomination .... But I speculate his chance would be thin
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                  • #10
                    Best General

                    Greetings, The best General of WW2 is without a doubt Eisenhower. Noone else could have pulled allof the allied top egos together to work as a TEAM. He was decisive and cared about the welfare of his troops. He was also highly respected and trusted to make the right decisions-which he did. without him the allied top command would have been a power struggle farce.

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                    • #11
                      you do have a point and the name that i'm glad not to see if Montgomery, if i offend any brits her I'm sorry, but he was solely responsible for the complete destruction of the Red Devils Airborne Infantry and he was responsible for the immense casualities of the 101st and the 82nd in Holland.
                      I do not find him as being a great general he was too concerned about his own ego.
                      Hell was full, so I came back.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ER Chaser


                        Zhukov.. hehe.. some1 (mostly Russian ... and secondly probably fins? ... like Sheik) hate him too much .... For me, well, he was the winner, what can I say?
                        We are only now getting a clear idea of how disasterous a general Zhukov was. Operation Mars being a monumental failure - and one for which no western general could have survived politically. Monty might have his failures, but I think more often than not his complaints come from his unwillingness to take casualties rather than a willingness to send his men haphazard into the German meatgrinder like Zhukov.
                        Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

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                        • #13
                          montgomery's unwillingness to take casualties, even though he knew they were there, montgomery dropped the 1st airbone RED DEVILS on top of the 9th and 10th SS Panzer Divisions that were stationed at Arnhem. over 10,000 went in and only 2000 came out and most of them were wounded at that.
                          Hell was full, so I came back.

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                          • #14
                            When evaluating Zhukov,

                            one must take into account the terrible condition the Red Army was in when he arrived from the East, where it might easily be said that he was quite instrumental in the Japanese deciding on a more southerly route of conquest.
                            Stalin's paranoic purges had left no true semblance of an organization within the military, and certainly no operational command structure. Though they had men and equipment, including the T-34, they had minimum training, command or communication capacity. The Soviets were practically defeated when the drive for Moscow was interrupted by Hitler. Valuable time was lost for which there would be no recapture as the late timetable for Barbarosa of June 22 (instead of May) meant no time for alterations of immense scale. Even at that, the Germans were within a rocks throw of the Kremlin when Zhukov launches his winter counter-strike. That, to me, is the beginning of the end of the 3rd Reich.

                            If one cannot swallow the Zhukov nomination, then perhaps Heinz G. would provide something of a more palatable consideration. He was not only an excellent strategist and tactician, he was a leader of men.

                            just the opinion of a boggy bayou denizen,
                            regards,
                            swampy

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                            • #15
                              Hi all. My first post here.

                              I'd have to say my personal favorite is Patton. He's just so flamboyant I've gotta pick him!

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