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  • japanese special navel landing units

    1.What were the SNLF (Special navel landing forces armed with/
    2. Did they wear the steel helmet mostly or the service cap?
    3. Where were they deployed?
    4. How many were there?
    5.What did their uniforms look like?
    6.Do you know of any veterans?

    Thanks!!
    Peter Williams

    "We're not lost private, we're in Normandy"-

    Lt. Richard Winters 101st 506 pir

  • #2
    SNLF.

    Not really having the answers handy; I do know of a good website for the SNLF

    http://www.geocities.com/dutcheastindies/SNLF.html


    Uniforms can be found here:
    http://www.geocities.com/dutcheastin..._Uniforms.html

    And unfortunately; I know of no Japanese veterans personally.

    I hope this helps some.,

    Cheers!


    Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

    "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

    What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

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    • #3
      Thanks Rstory

      Thanks Rstory I have a very special interest in the Japanese special Navel landing forces. I appreciate your efforts to help me find my answers.
      Peter Williams

      "We're not lost private, we're in Normandy"-

      Lt. Richard Winters 101st 506 pir

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by eagle101
        1.What were the SNLF (Special navel landing forces armed with/
        2. Did they wear the steel helmet mostly or the service cap?
        3. Where were they deployed?
        4. How many were there?
        5.What did their uniforms look like?
        6.Do you know of any veterans?

        Thanks!!
        There were a number of SNLF units raised before the war but they weren't terribly successful during the Pacific war. Two SNLF units that come to mind were the Sasebo and Yokosuka SNLF, although there were others raised. They were basically conscripted sailors who were given some military training and equipment. Their service caps bore the anchor of the Japanese Navy on them rather than the chrysanthemum of the Japanese Imperial Army.

        If memory serves, the three invasions and battles that come to mind ended up being unmittigated disasters for the Japanese SNLF. Their first Invasion attempt was on Wake Island in December 1941. It came to grief when Marine shore batteries on the island shot a number of their bombardment destroyers into pieces before they ever disembarked their SNLF troops into their landing boats. The attempt was driven off. Their second attempt just before Christmas resulted in their suffering crippling casualties before the Americans finally surrendered.

        The first Japanese troops on Guadalcanal were SNLF forces and they were utterly decimated during that campaign.

        The last example that comes to mind is the Battle of Milne Bay in 1943 wherein Australian forces in New Guinea drove off a major Japanese invasion landing attempt over the course of three days.

        The SNLF never lived up to what the Imperial Navy envisioned of them.
        "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by johnbryan
          There were a number of SNLF units raised before the war but they weren't terribly successful during the Pacific war. .... The SNLF never lived up to what the Imperial Navy envisioned of them.
          The SNLF reinvaded and lost Guadal Canal also....

          --------------
          SPECIAL NAVAL LANDING FORCES

          "The SN LF were organized by the navy from naval personell. Several were organized at each of the four Japanese Navy Shipyards (Kure, Maizuru, Sasebo, and Yokosuka). About 10 of these units had been organized by the beginning of the war in December, 1941, and an equal number were organized in 1942. There were no standard establishment figures for the SNLF. As the situation required, more men might be added to one unit, or a unit might be split into two or more independent parts.

          Generally speaking, the SNLF consisted of 500 to 1000 men each, with varying numbers of machine guns, mortars, and howitzers. The 3rd and 5th Kure, 5th Sasebo and 5th Yokosuka sent 2404 men to Papua, of which 1086 were casualties. These units also sent less than 500 men to Guadalcanal.

          Along with the 11th-16th Naval Construction Units and the 80th -- 85th Naval Garrison Units, the SNLF were often part of Naval Base Forces in the Solomons, which had been established at Guadalcanal--Tulagi, Shortland, Rabaul, and Kavieng. "

          From:
          http://www.magweb.com/sample/ww2/co01guao.htm
          Battles are dangerous affairs... Wang Hsi

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