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Best Western Tank Engine?

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  • Best Western Tank Engine?

    Which do you consider the best engine fitted to a Western Ally tank?

    The Rolls-Royce Meteor?





    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolls-Royce_Meteor

    The Ford GAA?







    http://www.fordgaaengine.com/

    Or Another?
    13
    Ford GAA
    30.77%
    4
    Rolls-Royce Meteor
    46.15%
    6
    Another (Please state)
    15.38%
    2
    Don't know/care
    7.69%
    1
    How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
    Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

  • #2
    R975 continental

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    • #3
      Continental AV 1790-1 standardized 22 July 1943. While it didn't see operational service, it remained a standard for the next 30+ years.

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      • #4
        I think its a toss up between Meteor which was a detuned Merlin and the Ford GAA which started life as a planned V12 aircraft engine.

        Consider that the best Ford GAA V-8 was rated at 525hp from 1100cid (18L) while the Meteor made 600hp from 1650cid (27L)

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        • #5
          The five engines they ganged in the Sherman...does that qualify as one or five or not at all?
          John

          Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JBark View Post
            The five engines they ganged in the Sherman...does that qualify as one or five or not at all?
            Each engine is considered seperately. It's an engine thread, not a tank one.
            How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
            Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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            • #7
              my vote is for Rolls Royce Meteor. i found this on wikipedia:
              For tank use the Merlin had its supercharger, reduction gear, and other equipment removed from its camshaft, greatly simplifying its construction. It had cast, rather than forged, pistons, and was de-rated to around 600 bhp (447 kW), running on lower-octane pool petrol instead of high-octane aviation fuel. In addition, because weight saving was not so important for a tank engine, some of the Merlin's more expensive light-alloy components were replaced with cheaper, steel components in the Meteor X version. It was also envisaged that the Meteor would use some components rejected on quality grounds for the Merlin, i.e. Merlin scrap.[1] In 1943 an acute shortage of blocks was met by dismantling surplus older marks of Merlins.

              Unlike earlier British tank engines, such as the American Liberty L-12 of 340 bhp (250 kW) licence-built by Nuffield and used in the Crusader, the Meteor engine, of virtually the same 1,650 in3 (27 litre) displacement as the earlier Liberty engine, from its R-R Merlin origins was very lightly stressed and reliable, and doubled the power available. Previously British tanks had been regarded as underpowered and unreliable, and the Meteor is considered to be the engine that for the first time gave British tanks ample, reliable power. Initially it was used in the Cromwell tank, which was a further development of the cruiser line and would replace the Crusader tank.

              But in 1941 Leyland, who had an order for 1,200 Meteor engines, were still advocating their own diesel tank engine, although it would deliver only 350 hp (260 kW), as they were concerned with the problems of sufficient cooling. Meadows produced some Meteors, but the small factory of 2,000 men was producing 40 different types of engine. So Meteor production was to be by Rover (Tyseley) and Morris (Coventry).

              The first Merlin prepared for tank use was tried in a modified Crusader in September 1941 at Aldersho
              this is a video of a car with RR Meteor:
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iF6IU...etailpage#t=8s


              ________________________________________________
              Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.
              Winston Churchill

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post
                Each engine is considered seperately. It's an engine thread, not a tank one.
                Hi Nick and all the best.
                I can't help thinking that the "Best western tank engine" would make a good name for a hotel in Bovington.
                meteor for me though,all the way!

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                • #9
                  I haven't decided yet. The Meteor was more powerful, but the GAA was a more modern design.
                  How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
                  Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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