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  • Serman hull design

    Any one know if the central hull on the Sherman was so high purely to give full gun depresion ability with turret faceing to rear.
    Wack tac mac hey.
    Regards.
    Grishnak.

  • #2
    Originally posted by grishnak View Post
    Any one know if the central hull on the Sherman was so high purely to give full gun depresion ability with turret faceing to rear.
    The reason for the hulls excessive height was the decision to adopt a forward sprocket drive system and therefore have a propshaft running the length of the fighting compartment.The turret basket sat above this.
    I've never understood how the Germans managed to combine forward drive with torsion bar suspension and come up with a lower hull height.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by flash View Post
      The reason for the hulls excessive height was the decision to adopt a forward sprocket drive system and therefore have a propshaft running the length of the fighting compartment.The turret basket sat above this.
      I've never understood how the Germans managed to combine forward drive with torsion bar suspension and come up with a lower hull height.
      It also has to do with the original Wright radial engine being used and the driveshaft angle that the engine created. That was the primary reason for it being the shape it became.

      The Germans managed to get lower hull heights by having engines designed for their tanks rather than take some off-the-shelf engine and shove it in like the US did. As a result the German tanks have a drive shaft that runs flat along the bottom of the hull (above the suspension torsion bars if present) unlike the US where the drive shaft slants down towards the front of the vehicle from fairly high in the engine compartment.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
        It also has to do with the original Wright radial engine being used and the driveshaft angle that the engine created. That was the primary reason for it being the shape it became.

        The Germans managed to get lower hull heights by having engines designed for their tanks rather than take some off-the-shelf engine and shove it in like the US did. As a result the German tanks have a drive shaft that runs flat along the bottom of the hull (above the suspension torsion bars if present) unlike the US where the drive shaft slants down towards the front of the vehicle from fairly high in the engine compartment.
        Ahaaaa!
        Cheers T.A

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        • #5
          Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
          It also has to do with the original Wright radial engine being used and the driveshaft angle that the engine created. That was the primary reason for it being the shape it became.

          The Germans managed to get lower hull heights by having engines designed for their tanks rather than take some off-the-shelf engine and shove it in like the US did. As a result the German tanks have a drive shaft that runs flat along the bottom of the hull (above the suspension torsion bars if present) unlike the US where the drive shaft slants down towards the front of the vehicle from fairly high in the engine compartment.
          Whereas we took an inline engine (Merlin) and mucked about with it (Meteor).

          The radial engines certainly proved useful, but I'd've thought that somebody would've though about mucking about with the Allison engines that were coming out of your ears.
          Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

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          • #6
            Looking at a cross section in"British and American tanks of world war two" the prop shaft arrangment does seem to play a large part though I wonder why a transfer box wasnt used to drop the shaft paralel to the floor.The tons of armour saved would shurely have compensated for the power loss.
            Wack tac mac hey.
            Regards.
            Grishnak.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by grishnak View Post
              Looking at a cross section in"British and American tanks of world war two" the prop shaft arrangment does seem to play a large part though I wonder why a transfer box wasnt used to drop the shaft paralel to the floor.The tons of armour saved would shurely have compensated for the power loss.
              Hello mate.
              Exactly this subject was covered in a thread in September entitled "Front sprocket drive".
              You should have a look ,it's quite interesting.

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