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Otto Carius, 27 May 1922-24 January 2015

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  • Otto Carius, 27 May 1922-24 January 2015

    Otto Carius, author of Tigers in the Mud, died today. After the war, he became a pharmacist and managed his own pharmacy, Tiger-Apotheke, until 2011.

  • #2
    This made me chuckle a bit...

    "Otto Carius, passed away after a short, but serious illness."


    The long toll of the brave
    Is not lost in darkness
    Over the fruitful earth
    And athwart the seas
    Hath passed the light of noble deeds
    Unquenchable forever.

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    • #3
      Aw...tanks, aircraft and artillery couldn't kill him. So he finally passed away from an illness? He was 92 for crying out loud! Such an amazing career. God's speed.

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      • #4
        The man was good at his job but unfortunately he fought for the wrong side ( obviously.)
        John

        Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

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        • #5
          Curious...I have a friend who happens to be a retired Army tank crew member in Iraq and did not know of Mr. Carius. I told him about his passing and about other German Aces and he read up on them. He was amazed, but concerned about how many US soldiers deaths were in his total and honoring such a man that had a hand in killing Americans.
          I realize it was war back then and it is over but...just how many of those tank kills were American?

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          • #6
            If I remember correctly from reading his book years ago he spent the vast majority of his time fighting with Army Group North on the Eastern Front. I believe he only ended up on the Western Front near the very end of the war as part of a Jagdtiger unit.
            "Artillery lends dignity to what might otherwise be a vulgar brawl." - Frederick the Great

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            • #7
              Carius was a member of 502nd Heavy. 2./502 with its 9 tigers was the first to get there, and Carius was one of them. The whole battalion later arrived. They fought in AGN sector for a long time, and I can kind of see why so many of the 502nd Tiger crews racked up a lot of kills. The Germans performed few offensive actions of note. For the defender, the terrain was restrained to narrow mobility corridors for approaching armor. The front was somewhat static, and a slugfest until early 1944 without major strategic collapses.

              This meant that the tiger crews were able to get a lot of relevant experience and skill in that particular region. Similarly, in the air there was Walter Nowotny of LF-I who shot down a ridiculous number of aircraft overhead.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by frisco17 View Post
                If I remember correctly from reading his book years ago he spent the vast majority of his time fighting with Army Group North on the Eastern Front. I believe he only ended up on the Western Front near the very end of the war as part of a Jagdtiger unit.
                Yes,he was very contemptuous of US fighting ability and by extension Commonwealth I presume.
                This makes me think he hadn't any experience against the West because those that had both often commented on the virtual impossibility of moving in anything other than darkness or bad weather and the overwhelming allied artillery brought down instantly on the slightest pretext.
                I think a lot of ex Eastern fronters thought that compared to Ivan, Tommy and Joe were pushovers,they soon changed their tune though.

                I leave it to Trooper Joe Ekins,Cobbler from Northampton and gunner in a Northamptonshire Yeomanry Firefly to provide a suitable eulogy for Carius (although this was aimed at Wittmann):

                "He accepted the doctrines of Hitler enough to get in his tank and invade other peoples countries,country after country.
                Anybody who goes into another persons country to kill is a criminal.
                I'm afraid that,er,he might have been a hero to the Germans but,er...Not to me."

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                • #9
                  Thanks all for the great responses! A hardy salute to you all

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                  • #10
                    My major gripe with this eulogising of supposed 'good Germans fighting for their country' like Galland, Rommel, Carrius and other vermin of their ilk... every time they held the line for a day, that day saw more trains arrive at Auschwitz and Belsen.

                    The long toll of the brave
                    Is not lost in darkness
                    Over the fruitful earth
                    And athwart the seas
                    Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                    Unquenchable forever.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
                      My major gripe with this eulogising of supposed 'good Germans fighting for their country' like Galland, Rommel, Carrius and other vermin of their ilk... every time they held the line for a day, that day saw more trains arrive at Auschwitz and Belsen.

                      Quite!
                      That's how I feel about the "controversy" over BC's night raids.

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                      • #12
                        "It is well that war is so terrible–we would grow too fond of it!” --Robert E. Lee

                        War has too many victims, but it never seems to be the politicians who started it themselves. I would wonder if the idealist like Carius or folks like him, would have ever put on their uniforms if they knew what Hitler had envisioned for the world?
                        As for the Nazi party....

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                        • #13
                          GOD................I love how the Armchair Generals pontificate about the rights and wrongs of the fighting man in ww2.

                          GET A GRIP .

                          Lets see what you do when your family ,friends, country are at stake. What would it take.

                          We are ALL human beings and we ALL have a point at which we resort to the lowest common denominator.

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                          • #14
                            It is just that some nation's denominators are way lower than others

                            The law of cause and effect best explains the suffering of the Germans in 1945.
                            Last edited by m kenny; 13 Feb 15, 10:38.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by nomis View Post
                              GOD................I love how the Armchair Generals pontificate about the rights and wrongs of the fighting man in ww2.

                              GET A GRIP .

                              Lets see what you do when your family ,friends, country are at stake. What would it take.

                              We are ALL human beings and we ALL have a point at which we resort to the lowest common denominator.
                              In my family past we have already gone thru "..are at stake". I'm Native American and my tribe already hit bottom...in America! Beside, a grip is what I am good at

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