Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Inside the Chieftain's Hatch presents a Cruiser Mark II A10 Mark Ia CS

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Inside the Chieftain's Hatch presents a Cruiser Mark II A10 Mark Ia CS

    Even starts with a look at an A9 with the frontal MG subturrets.

    Part 1 - exterior



    Part 2 - interior (which will autoload after part 1)



  • #2
    Two things of note from our previous discussions on this vehicle I noted:

    1. The top speed he gave is 16 mph. Right or wrong, that's what he stated.
    2. The crew on that thing are all but blind buttoned up. I doubt they could spot anything that wasn't big and right in front of them in combat. That in my book makes it something of a deathtrap. Your first indication that there are bad guys is rounds coming through the vehicle or bouncing off it.

    There were some good things in the design, but on the whole I'd say it was mediocre, the negatives outweighing the positives.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
      Two things of note from our previous discussions on this vehicle I noted:

      1. The top speed he gave is 16 mph. Right or wrong, that's what he stated.
      2. The crew on that thing are all but blind buttoned up. I doubt they could spot anything that wasn't big and right in front of them in combat. That in my book makes it something of a deathtrap. Your first indication that there are bad guys is rounds coming through the vehicle or bouncing off it.

      There were some good things in the design, but on the whole I'd say it was mediocre, the negatives outweighing the positives.
      The crew on all tanks of that era were blind when shut down. The reason for high casualties amongst tank commanders of all nations was putting the head out of the turret hatch to have a look round.
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

      Comment


      • #4
        Not true. The German tanks of that period had numerous vision ports and slits, commander's cupolas, and reasonably good view for the crew when buttoned up. The French tanks, likewise generally had numerous view ports, vision blocks, and often a cupola for the commander / turret crewman. Of course, having two man crews, and a commander who was also loader, gunner, radio operator, and everything else made the French vehicles inefficient but not for lack of vision devices. The Germans and French also generally had glass blocks behind things like vision slits to prevent bullet splash from entering the vehicle.

        Now, I can understand that part of the problem was likely a penny-pinching government that wanted the tank on the cheap so Vickers took every opportunity to lower their costs in making it. Hence, a minimum of castings, riveted construction, and elimination of any refinements or details that would add to the production cost.

        Comment

        Latest Topics

        Collapse

        Working...
        X