Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Greatest Generation?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Greatest Generation?

    The generation that fought World War II is often refered to as the "Greatest Generation". Was just wondering why they were better than any other. And where did the phrase originate? Was it Tom Brokaw's book or somewhere else?
    If there are no dogs in Heaven, then I want to go where they went when they died-Will Rogers

  • #2
    I don't know your answers, but I know this much.

    WW1 was the wasted generation, owing to the world throwing away so many men's lives.

    WW2 was to me the great lost generation, because between Stalin's purges, The Japanese in China, the Germans extermination efforts, and all the people that died stopping them, we lost a great deal of humanity.

    Greatest Generation? My dad was born in the 20s I believe. THAT was the greatest generation. You can take that as you wish I don't much plan to change though

    My dad was a man's man. Worked his whole life. Supported his family. Provided a perfect example of what responsibility means. He never had occasion to wear a uniform. Spent his working years telling you where your train was headed. Missed 3 lousy days in more than four decades. One of those days he was busy taking my mom to the hospital to have me.

    Just because he missed out on death, dying, and killing from 6 horrible years of war doesn't make any of the poor sods that didn't escape it better than him.
    Life is change. Built models for decades.
    Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
    I didn't for a long time either.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by les Brains View Post
      I don't know your answers, but I know this much.

      WW1 was the wasted generation, owing to the world throwing away so many men's lives.

      WW2 was to me the great lost generation, because between Stalin's purges, The Japanese in China, the Germans extermination efforts, and all the people that died stopping them, we lost a great deal of humanity.

      Greatest Generation? My dad was born in the 20s I believe. THAT was the greatest generation. You can take that as you wish I don't much plan to change though

      My dad was a man's man. Worked his whole life. Supported his family. Provided a perfect example of what responsibility means. He never had occasion to wear a uniform. Spent his working years telling you where your train was headed. Missed 3 lousy days in more than four decades. One of those days he was busy taking my mom to the hospital to have me.

      Just because he missed out on death, dying, and killing from 6 horrible years of war doesn't make any of the poor sods that didn't escape it better than him.
      I agree LB,any kids that were born in the 20s lived their young lives through the depression years and if you come from a working class family it was rough and yes your Dad deserves to have a family that is proud of him. Some of us that were born in the twenty's found ourselves in one of the services while in our teens it depended on what year in the 20s you were born. Not dwelling to much on the armed forces side of it, I have always felt that my teenage years were stolen from me (although I do know I was not by myself) I left school at the age of 14 one month before the war started and went to work in a machine shop of a wartime factory, involving years of long shift work, went into the Marines at 18, landed in Normandy one month before my 19th Birthday and came back to civilian life at the age of 21 and realised that BANG that was your teens that was!
      'By Horse by Tram'.


      I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
      " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah dad was more scarred by the depression than WW2 could ever manage.

        Spent his entire adult life with 200 bucks in his wallet that he would never touch no matter what the need. It was a bone of contention with my mom a number of times, but I can see maybe why he did it.

        His dad dumped his mom and dad had to go to work at 16 to support her. Granted I can't blame his dad, I have no kind words for his mom (my granny on his side), I hated the woman. When she died, my 'goodbye' sounded more like get lost.

        Dad had a lot of habits made from the depression years. He simply couldn't get his head around the idea going out to lunch just for the heck of it. I suppose too many lean years. Let me tell ya, I know what 'eat what is put in front of you' is all about.

        Drives me nuts my wife is the opposite. Her parents had the idea eat what you like. She wastes a lot of food too.
        Plays into my hands though. Occasionally she gets told 'you throw YOUR money away every time you open a new loaf of bread before finishing the last loaf, me, I spent the same amount of money, and I buy a model with it.

        I have no sympathy for people that waste. My dad taught me to spend money efficiently.
        Life is change. Built models for decades.
        Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
        I didn't for a long time either.

        Comment


        • #5
          My brother was born in 25. He is anything but great. He was a hen picked father of three, all of which have had extreme problems in life mostly due, imo, to his dominant wife, who was 18 year younger. He is my brother but I don't hold him in high esteem as a man. The Greatest Generation is just another myth. Many of the problems that we now have in America can be traced back to this generation.
          "Ask not what your country can do for you"

          Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

          youíre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

          Comment


          • #6
            Here's a poem by F. Tyutchev which might be the answer:

            Cicero

            The Roman orator spoke out
            'midst civil war and strife:
            'Too long I slumbered, and Rome's night
            Has overtaken me upon my journey!'
            True! But in parting with Rom's glory
            From the Capitoline heights
            You watched in all its grandeur
            The setting of her bloody sun! . . .
            Blessed are they who sojourned here
            In this world's fateful hours-
            For they were summoned by the angels
            As guests to a great feast;
            They witnessed spectacles majestic,
            Were brought into the inner circle,
            And, while there, drank immortal life
            From heav'n's own chalice!
            www.histours.ru

            Siege of Leningrad battlefield tour

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeah dad was more scarred by the depression than WW2 could ever manage.

              I can believe that.
              Helpless frustration on one had, and a violent, terrifying situation on the other that you could actually DO something about on the other.

              Or does one inevitably lead to the other?
              It gets mentioned once in a while, but I have to wonder if people are really aware of how the Depression lead to WW2, directly, I mean.

              Greatest Generation? Yes, expect for giving birth to a generation of whining bums.
              But that was the 29th century. The greatest Generation of all times will be the one that gets us out of the mess that is the legacy of the current batch of Bastards, who call themselves our "leaders".

              Wish them luck.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
                My brother was born in 25. He is anything but great. He was a hen picked father of three, all of which have had extreme problems in life mostly due, imo, to his dominant wife, who was 18 year younger. He is my brother but I don't hold him in high esteem as a man. The Greatest Generation is just another myth. Many of the problems that we now have in America can be traced back to this generation.
                Hi John, you have picked the year that I was born in so consequently I must jump in in defence of my generation. I do think it is a little unfair to judge us for the present day problems I think that much of the present day strife is caused by postwar politicians that have let one hell of a lot of the old beliefs 'fall by the wayside'. I will not go further into that subject, or I will be labled a 'Silly old F**t and 45 will be after my blood again!! I have never done 'big things' with my life but I am proud of two things, my whole Family and the fact that that I served three of the war years (as a conscript I admit, in one of the finest Corps in the world!) lcm1
                'By Horse by Tram'.


                I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by sherlock View Post
                  The generation that fought World War II is often refered to as the "Greatest Generation". Was just wondering why they were better than any other. And where did the phrase originate? Was it Tom Brokaw's book or somewhere else?
                  Because they lived through the Great Depression when the best course of action was shooting yourself in the head (no jobs, no hope) and then they were thrown into the hell of WWII and they absorbed all that punishment without complaining. They gave us America that was more powerful than ever before.

                  Compare them to the effeminate, weak, cowardly, politicized, pathetic generation of the 1960s who couldn't even handle the Vietnam War alone, not to mention other crises, and then see for yourself which generation was the best.
                  Last edited by MonsterZero; 28 Jun 10, 00:57.

                  "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
                  --Frederick II, King of Prussia

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I suspect different generations have different strengths and weaknesses. My generation (I was born in '67) is not so much whining as self-absorbed with an incredibly limited attention span and little sense of what lies beyond 48 hours and 2000 miles from the here and now. It also is wonderfully adept at using technology and it is quite efficient. The following generation (my kids) are even more so. I suspect they will never see a carburator, much less open the pan and flick the spring a few times to get the car running when the engine is cold. But they will also use wireless and nanotechnology much more efficiently than I will in my lifetime.

                    That said, some generations are tested in dramatic ways - French who were born around 1770, Soviet citizens born around 1890, Britons, French and Germans born around 1925 - and so on. Others were not cursed, as the Chinese say, to live in interesting times.

                    Patton once recalled Sir Edmund Allenby saying that for every Alexander the Great there are many such men born who are just not lucky enough to live in times that called for their talents. I'd like to think that in similar situations, the postwar generations would drop their self-absorption and rise to the occasion. Of course, we'll never know - Vietnam 1968, Kuwait 1990 and Afghanistan 2002 were not World War II.
                    "There are only two professions in the world in which the amateur excels the professional. One, military strategy, and, two, prostitution."
                    -- Maj. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower

                    (Avatar: Commodore Edwin Ward Moore, Republic of Texas Navy)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      From Wiki....

                      "The Greatest Generation" is a term coined by journalist Tom Brokaw to describe the generation[1] who grew up in the United States during the deprivation of the Great Depression, and then went on to fight in World War II, as well as those whose productivity within the war's home front made a decisive material contribution to the war effort. The generation is sometimes referred to as the G.I. Generation. It follows the Lost Generation of the 1920s who fought in World War I and precedes the Silent Generation of the 1930s. The Greatest Generation are the parents of the Baby Boomers. The term was used by William Strauss and Neil Howe in their book The Fourth Turning to describe the British generation that fought in WWII.



                      Originally posted by sherlock View Post
                      The generation that fought World War II is often refered to as the "Greatest Generation". Was just wondering why they were better than any other. And where did the phrase originate? Was it Tom Brokaw's book or somewhere else?
                      My worst jump story:
                      My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
                      As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
                      No lie.

                      ~
                      "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
                      -2 Commando Jumpmaster

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm from 62, and I think of myself as the almost last generation.

                        I grew up with nuclear winter, duck and cover and every movie seemed to be about the end of the world (not from natural disasters either).

                        I grew up with Nato vs Warsaw Pact, and it was hard to be thrilled about walking on the moon, as it was mostly about getting there before the commies.

                        I knew a level of tension that 9/11 just couldn't equal. Frankly orange and yellow alerts never met diddly to me. Yes 9/11 was tragic, but it was just a couple of buildings and doesn't equal the movie On The Beach even remotely.

                        Vietnam was just the flavour of the moment, just one more location for the east vs west shoving match. It wasn't Korea, and it wasn't Bay of pigs. It was just the constant threat that never went away.

                        Today is so much 'easier' to live with. Yeah terrorism is still terrible, but a few idiot Muslim bombers can't hold a candle to hundreds of Soviet missiles aimed at or near me all the time.

                        I can't even think of playing WW3 setting wargames. They bring back too many ghosts of my youth. When I put on the uniform, I wondered if I'd die under a wave of Soviet armour in West Germany. Seemed really possible then.

                        Today the climate is the boogieman, and it is likely that most of what we are told is mostly bullshyt. But when I was young, the threat wasn't poorly researched science. Khrushchev threated to bury us, but it is possible if we had lost our minds, there wouldn't have been anyone or much of anything to bury.

                        WW2 was horrible, it happened and many millions died.
                        WW3 never happened and thankfully it didn't, because I sure wouldn't be typing on a laptop, safe in a world of high tech, pondering all the things I ponder eh. The world if it survived at all, would likely look more like the dark ages currently.
                        Life is change. Built models for decades.
                        Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
                        I didn't for a long time either.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm just glad you survived all that.

                          Originally posted by les Brains View Post
                          I'm from 62, and I think of myself as the almost last generation.

                          SNIP
                          My worst jump story:
                          My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
                          As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
                          No lie.

                          ~
                          "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
                          -2 Commando Jumpmaster

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
                            I agree LB,any kids that were born in the 20s lived their young lives through the depression years and if you come from a working class family it was rough and yes your Dad deserves to have a family that is proud of him. Some of us that were born in the twenty's found ourselves in one of the services while in our teens it depended on what year in the 20s you were born. Not dwelling to much on the armed forces side of it, I have always felt that my teenage years were stolen from me (although I do know I was not by myself) I left school at the age of 14 one month before the war started and went to work in a machine shop of a wartime factory, involving years of long shift work, went into the Marines at 18, landed in Normandy one month before my 19th Birthday and came back to civilian life at the age of 21 and realised that BANG that was your teens that was!
                            You must be around the same age my grandad would be if he was still alive. He was serving in the RN as a boy in 1939 (he had been given a choice by a magistrate, prison or Navy) at the age of 14. By the age of 19 he was an acting Petty Officer and had seen action in the Med, North Atlantic, the Med again then Northern Europe as a Commando. I've never been able to comprehend that. Oh yeah, then Korea on the Unicorn.

                            It messed him up for a long time, saw things no 15 year old should have to see.

                            I don't necessarily think though that his, and your, generation were the greatest, (no offence intended) just that they had to overcome the greatest tribulations. I don't doubt that we still have within us the ability to survive if needs be.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Fodder76 View Post
                              You must be around the same age my grandad would be if he was still alive. He was serving in the RN as a boy in 1939 (he had been given a choice by a magistrate, prison or Navy) at the age of 14. By the age of 19 he was an acting Petty Officer and had seen action in the Med, North Atlantic, the Med again then Northern Europe as a Commando. I've never been able to comprehend that. Oh yeah, then Korea on the Unicorn.

                              It messed him up for a long time, saw things no 15 year old should have to see.

                              I don't necessarily think though that his, and your, generation were the greatest, (no offence intended) just that they had to overcome the greatest tribulations. I don't doubt that we still have within us the ability to survive if needs be.
                              Yes of course you have, it is reminding me of a saying of my mums, 'Needs must when the Devil drives'. Which I assume meant that under pressure you will show your ability! Re: your Grandad, the R.N. had their own Commando's. Also there was no messing with the lads on 'Boys Service' during the war, I know a bloke who was manning a 'PomPom' gun on the Arctic convoys at the age of 16!!
                              'By Horse by Tram'.


                              I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                              " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X