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A Small part of War

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  • A Small part of War

    http://www.fortstanton.com/Internment%20Camp.htm\\


    Fort Stanton: The Internment Camp

    In December 1940, a group from the United States Department of Justice visited the Fort Stanton Marine Hospital with an eye toward using a portion of the grounds to solve a particularly difficult diplomatic situation. They were searching for a temporary location to house over 400 distressed German sailors living in the Unites States as result of being trapped behind a British blockade at the outbreak of World War II. As a neutral nation at the time, the United States allowed the German sailors temporary refuge, and sought a way to return the non-combatant sailors to Germany. As a nation at war, England would not allow German men of military age to return to Germany in fear that they would join the Nazi military. Thus, finding safe passage across the Atlantic or Pacific for the distressed seaman proved difficult. Though the German sailors were not considered prisoners of war, in part because the Unites States was not at war, the men were considered detainees and not subject to the same types of discipline as prisoners. The presence of German sailors in American cities however, often roused anti-German sentiment among the local population – thus creating the need to find an isolated place until a political or diplomatic solution for their return to Germany could be found.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Columbus_(1924)



    A story the I first heard of this evening on German TV. I found it very interesting and thought I would share this little peice of the War with you.
    Last edited by Half Pint John; 28 May 10, 17:00.
    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

    you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

  • #2
    I couldn't get the links to work. Were they detained for the duration or did some make it back to Germany before December 1941? And, since they were detained before the U.S. was at war with Germany, would they cease to be detainees and become POW'S after December 41 if they were still being held?

    Interesting story.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by llkinak View Post
      I couldn't get the links to work. Were they detained for the duration or did some make it back to Germany before December 1941? And, since they were detained before the U.S. was at war with Germany, would they cease to be detainees and become POW'S after December 41 if they were still being held?

      Interesting story.
      Sorry about the link. I just tried it and it doesn't work for me either. Try a Google of Ft Stanton NM. You most likely well have to check a couple different links that they give to come up wit the story.

      Yes, for the duration but as civilians they were not pow's but were treated as such. Meaning well treated in this case. None made it back to Germany until about 46.

      Just to add some meat, they were first brought to Ellis Island in NYC then later transferred to Angel Island in SF, buy train. Until our entry into the war the were warmly welcomed along the route and while in SF. The were allowed weekly 'liberty' to visit SF and were well received, until Dec 7th. With the animosity after Dec 7th it was decided to move them to a more remote location, Ft Stanton. There the Captain held them under tight control with ship board discipline. They built up the camp into a pretty comfortable location, including a swimming pool, which was the only one in the area. Post war the locals used it into the 60's.

      Under the GC pows were to get the same rations us the military holding pow's. This was true of these prisoners as well. They got chocolate while the local kids did not. This made for some trading between the two different groups. After the war some stayed on in the US but most went home. A couple returned to the US and stayed.

      They were all later moved to Ft Lincoln NE and most worked in logging camps. This was after some die hard Nazi's had become inmates. IIRC these were mostly prisoners taken in NA. Among the crew it seems like most of them were just German seamen with little political interest.
      "Ask not what your country can do for you"

      Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

      you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the info.

        Comment

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