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  • Blitz Street..

    Interesting documentary presented by Baldrick of 'Blackadder' fame. The stories of the survivors stole the show as they rightly do in these kind of programmes.
    The two 'bombs' landing on Blitz Street were spectacular, truth be told it's pretty much wrecked after two hits by relatively small bombs. They'll have to save the V2 explosion till last or the only thing left will be rubble!

    http://www.channel4.com/programmes/blitz-street
    The long toll of the brave
    Is not lost in darkness
    Over the fruitful earth
    And athwart the seas
    Hath passed the light of noble deeds
    Unquenchable forever.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
    Interesting documentary presented by Baldrick of 'Blackadder' fame. The stories of the survivors stole the show as they rightly do in these kind of programmes.
    The two 'bombs' landing on Blitz Street were spectacular, truth be told it's pretty much wrecked after two hits by relatively small bombs. They'll have to save the V2 explosion till last or the only thing left will be rubble!

    http://www.channel4.com/programmes/blitz-street
    I watched this. It was pretty good. We should be making our AFV's from that milk bottle . Those who watched the program will know what I mean .
    How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
    Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
      Interesting documentary presented by Baldrick of 'Blackadder' fame. The stories of the survivors stole the show as they rightly do in these kind of programmes.
      The two 'bombs' landing on Blitz Street were spectacular, truth be told it's pretty much wrecked after two hits by relatively small bombs. They'll have to save the V2 explosion till last or the only thing left will be rubble!

      http://www.channel4.com/programmes/blitz-street
      Hi Von, would like to see that,makes me think of my wife who told me that her street in Fulham was completely obliterated in one night killing amongst others her teenage brother.
      'By Horse by Tram'.


      I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
      " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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      • #4
        Mispost
        Last edited by Post Captain; 20 Apr 10, 13:02.
        Never Fear the Event

        Admiral Lord Nelson

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
          Interesting documentary presented by Baldrick of 'Blackadder' fame. The stories of the survivors stole the show as they rightly do in these kind of programmes.
          The two 'bombs' landing on Blitz Street were spectacular, truth be told it's pretty much wrecked after two hits by relatively small bombs. They'll have to save the V2 explosion till last or the only thing left will be rubble!

          http://www.channel4.com/programmes/blitz-street
          Its an interesting point is that. My grandad served from the outbreak of war in 1939 right through to Korea in the Royal Navy but he couldn't remember with any clarity any of the incidents (apart from one, extremely disturbing incident that he witnessed in 1940 when he was 15 and even then it was only as a "snapshot")

          A recent experiment conducted jointly by the Open Uni, Manchester Police and the BBC, showed just how incredibly bad we are at remembering incidents with any degree of clarity. It's made me wonder, how much of what's remembered is acurate and how much is what the person believes they remember, without any duplicity or intention to deceive?

          I think the most honest account of the second world war I've read must be the Forgotten Soldier, simply because he admits that his memories are fragmented and cloudy.

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          • #6
            Did they give any indication on the amount of punishment the Anderson Shelter could take?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Canuckster View Post
              Did they give any indication on the amount of punishment the Anderson Shelter could take?

              I think the Anderson would probably protect the occupants from near misses and falling rubble fairly well being partly below ground level, only partly from bomb blast, I say only partly because their was no protection in the entrance way and a bomb exploding in direct line with that, the blast could quite probably (if a near miss) kill everyone inside! But still a better defence than nothing at all.
              'By Horse by Tram'.


              I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
              " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Canuckster View Post
                Did they give any indication on the amount of punishment the Anderson Shelter could take?

                There's an Anderson shelter in one of the gardens, so far it'e been well shielded from bomb damage by the buildings. Seeing as how they've built one I'm sure it'll get a searching going over before the Blitz ends.

                The long toll of the brave
                Is not lost in darkness
                Over the fruitful earth
                And athwart the seas
                Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                Unquenchable forever.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
                  I think the Anderson would probably protect the occupants from near misses and falling rubble fairly well being partly below ground level, only partly from bomb blast, I say only partly because their was no protection in the entrance way and a bomb exploding in direct line with that, the blast could quite probably (if a near miss) kill everyone inside!
                  Now that you mention it lcm I don't think I've ever seen a picture of the shelter buttoned up, always assumed that they used a sheet of corrugated metal as a door. Strange they didn't use something to protect the entrance.

                  But still a better defence than nothing at all.
                  That's what I always thought but perhaps there were actually better spots in the house ie. under the stairwell?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Von Richter View Post


                    There's an Anderson shelter in one of the gardens, so far it'e been well shielded from bomb damage by the buildings. Seeing as how they've built one I'm sure it'll get a searching going over before the Blitz ends.

                    When they do cover the subject, please post the results, I'd be quite interested to know how it fared.

                    Not sure when they will air it over here. Can look at pictures but unfortunately the site blocks all the vids from those outside the country.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Canuckster View Post
                      Now that you mention it lcm I don't think I've ever seen a picture of the shelter buttoned up, always assumed that they used a sheet of corrugated metal as a door. Strange they didn't use something to protect the entrance.



                      That's what I always thought but perhaps there were actually better spots in the house ie. under the stairwell?
                      I saw a few but never ever saw one with any kind of door on it. Perhaps as you say there may have been some sort of closure for them but I have a feeling not. Stair wells were used in some cases, my Mum always said that if it got real bad the coal cellar under the stairs in the scullery which was the basement of their house would be the place but fortunately where they lived was lucky.( Somehow I always had difficulty imagining my Dad climbing into the coal cellar!!)
                      'By Horse by Tram'.


                      I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                      " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
                        I saw a few but never ever saw one with any kind of door on it. Perhaps as you say there may have been some sort of closure for them but I have a feeling not. Stair wells were used in some cases, my Mum always said that if it got real bad the coal cellar under the stairs in the scullery which was the basement of their house would be the place but fortunately where they lived was lucky.( Somehow I always had difficulty imagining my Dad climbing into the coal cellar!!)

                        Ours had a corragated iron (tin) door that shut just like the garden gate, with a latch....but as I said before it was cold, damp, the earwigs crept in amd very uncomfortable...we slept in it one night and that was enough for my mother who declared "if she was going to die it would be in her own bed" so back to the house we went and the chickens moved into our shelter.....somethings you remember for ever.......

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bow View Post
                          Ours had a corragated iron (tin) door that shut just like the garden gate, with a latch....but as I said before it was cold, damp, the earwigs crept in amd very uncomfortable...we slept in it one night and that was enough for my mother who declared "if she was going to die it would be in her own bed" so back to the house we went and the chickens moved into our shelter.....somethings you remember for ever.......
                          Hi bow, it's good to talk to someone that can say I remember, just like me! Those that I recall because they were set a bit into the ground did not have room for a swinging gate but I suppose it was according to whatever space was allowed when the hole was being dug, Cheers, Lcm1.
                          'By Horse by Tram'.


                          I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                          " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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                          • #14
                            I saw it, I wondered what they made that milkbottle from, was it glued to the pavement. I have often seen milkbottles blown over by the wind, yet the blast from a 500kg bomb could not topple it.
                            War is less costly than servitude

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by kendrick View Post
                              I saw it, I wondered what they made that milkbottle from, was it glued to the pavement. I have often seen milkbottles blown over by the wind, yet the blast from a 500kg bomb could not topple it.
                              Ah, these cheap old Jerry bombs we've got stronger milk bottles!
                              'By Horse by Tram'.


                              I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                              " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                              Comment

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