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Slovak Army 1939-1944, Invasion Into Poland And Russia.

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  • Slovak Army 1939-1944, Invasion Into Poland And Russia.

    Slovak Army 1939-1944 photos (Invasion into Poland and the USSR)

    http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums...d-and-the-USSR

  • #2
    LOTS of good photos!

    I recall that a Slovak or a Croatian Regiment was destroyed at Stalingrad.

    What became of the Slovak Army after 1942?

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    • #3
      This last section of this clip shows Slovakian troops entering the Ukraine in July 1941. I also have a clip somewhere of Slovakian troops involved in the recapture of Rostov in July 1942.


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      • #4
        Originally posted by Exorcist View Post
        LOTS of good photos!

        I recall that a Slovak or a Croatian Regiment was destroyed at Stalingrad.

        What became of the Slovak Army after 1942?
        Hi Exocist, here is a good link that will show you...ray.. http://www.czechpatriots.com/csmu/battalion.php

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        • #5
          Pics're good but movie can't harm:



          Slovakian Army invadeing Poland in 1939.
          "[...]

          While Brittania's Huns with their long-range guns
          Sailed in through the foggy dew.


          [...]"

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          • #6
            Slovak vs Hungary Border War Mar 1939

            "Subsequent to the Vienna award, on March 22-23, 1939 Hungarian troops moved westward (stopping just east of Snina). The first village to be occupied was Ubla, surprising and capturing a company of the 16th infantry Regiment of the Slovak Army. They attacked a line from Velky Bereznyj to Ulic and from Vysne Nemecke to Sobrance. the Slovak Army attempted to repel this invasion with two Army groups, "Stakcin" and "Michalovce." By March 25, the Slovak Army had assembled 15,000 troops in Michalovce. The Slovak Army counter attacked, the Hungarians held, and then the Hungarian Army proceeded with another counter attack. The stalemate just outside of Stakcin remained for the duration of the War. Hungary annexed this Slovakia territory to Hungary without diplomatic agreement. Generally speaking, the north-south border ran from Poland in the north to the new south-east corner near Velke Kapusany, pushing eastward approximately 20 Km"

            Robert
            For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman

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            • #7
              I heard a little about that war a long time ago- I think it was the last air-war between Bi-planes.

              The last of the 'splendid little wars".

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              • #8
                From what I have read the Air War part was the most intense part of the war. IIRC there were some other engagement between biplanes after that. Ill have to look and see . Robert

                The Air War

                "However, prior to this, the Slovaks were forced to defend their country just after declaring independence as the Hungarians were intent on incorporating Ruthenia (a.k.a Carpatho-Ukraine), which had itself declared independence from Slovakia when Slovakia did the same from Czecho-Slovakia, as well as more of Slovakia than they had gotten from the First Vienna Award of 1938. The revanchist Hungarians hoped to conquer both and restore the pre-1918 Kingdom of Hungary's northern border.
                The Hungarians attacked Slovakia proper on 23 March 1939 after occupying Ruthenia against minor resistance. The SVZ could only muster some 20+ B-534/Bk-534 fighters and 20-odd S-328 observation aircraft to oppose the invasion. Even those numbers were generous given the struggle to create the SVZ. But a number of Czechs volunteered to delay their departure to defend Slovakia which proved crucial to the ability of the SVZ to put aircraft in the air, even if the results were less than satisfactory.
                The Slovaks flew a number of reconnaissance and attack sorties over the advancing Hungarians on the first day at a cost of two escorting B-534s shot down and five additional aircraft damaged by anti-aircraft fire.
                The first aerial encounters occurred the next day as the Slovak aircraft were intercepted by Hungarian Fiat CR.32bis biplane fighters. These didn't go well for the SVZ as it lost five B-534s and two S-328s shot down and a number of additional aircraft damaged. The Slovaks claimed 2 CR.32s shot down, but the Hungarians claimed zero aircraft lost for nine shot down. The truth will probably never be known.
                The Hungarians stopped their advance on the 25th of March after Germany's guarantee of Slovakia's borders became effective, but some 400 square miles of southern Slovakia were ceded to Hungary."

                http://web.archive.org/web/200712100.../Slovakaf.html
                Last edited by JCFalkenbergIII; 08 Apr 10, 01:58.
                For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman

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