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  • "Sticky Bombs"

    It turns out that the original "sticky bomb" that was introduced by the British in early WWII was completely different from what Steven Spielberg had shown us in Saving Private Ryan. I don't know if you remember, but in the film the American soldiers used socks stuffed with TNT and coated with grease.

    The British design was produced on a large scale in ordnance factories and looked like an oversize stick grenade. The explosive was nitroglycerin, very thick, honey-consistency, contained within a soft bladder at the end of the stick. The bladder was coated with an extraordinarily tenacious glue. This bomb could literally stick to the soldier's pants or battle dress if not handled carefully and couldn't be pulled off, so extraordinary care had to be taken with live/armed bombs.

    Before shipping to the units the bladders were encased in protective metal shells because otherwise they could stick to anything they touched. Those shells fell off as soon as the pin was pulled immediately prior to launch.

    The goal was to break the bladder upon impact on the tank hull so that the thick nitroglycerin syrup could pour over the tank immediately prior to detonating. This produced the best results.

    A very interesting, if awkward concept .

    Last edited by MonsterZero; 13 Mar 10, 01:05.

    "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
    --Frederick II, King of Prussia

  • #2
    Originally posted by MonsterZero View Post
    It turns out that the original "sticky bomb" that was introduced by the British in early WWII was completely different from what Steven Spielberg had shown us in Saving Private Ryan.
    You don't say.

    The British had a huge variety of hand held Grenades for AT work after the battle of France. There's a couple of Versions of the sticky Bomb you mention above. The No68 AT Grenade (a primitive HEAT warhead in 1940) and the No 73 Thermos Grenade. And of course the ever famous Gammon bomb (which isn't too far removed from what SPR did). Two types of No76 "grenade" (although I do think that description might be pushing it a little).

    PS: Look what I found while Googling to check my facts:
    http://met.open.ac.uk/group/jwl/hg_manual/01.htm
    Winnie says
    ---------------------------------
    "He fell out of a Gestapo car, over a bridge, and onto a railway line. Then was run over by the Berlin Express.

    It was an Accident."
    Herr Flick.

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    • #3
      It should be noted that the No 74 grenade, the infamous 'sticky bomb', was never used in combat by regular units of the British army. Its only known operational use was by partisans as a demolition device in Europe.

      source: The Encyclopedia of Infantry Weapons Of WW2 by Ian V. Hogg
      Last edited by redcoat; 13 Mar 10, 10:29.

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      • #4
        It works very well in Compagny of Heroes.

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        • #5
          Yeah, it was a problem when those guys would remove the cover and it would stick to them as they threw it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by MonsterZero View Post
            It turns out that the original "sticky bomb" that was introduced by the British in early WWII was completely different from what Steven Spielberg had shown us in Saving Private Ryan. I don't know if you remember, but in the film the American soldiers used socks stuffed with TNT and coated with grease.

            The British design was produced on a large scale in ordnance factories and looked like an oversize stick grenade. The explosive was nitroglycerin, very thick, honey-consistency, contained within a soft bladder at the end of the stick. The bladder was coated with an extraordinarily tenacious glue. This bomb could literally stick to the soldier's pants or battle dress if not handled carefully and couldn't be pulled off, so extraordinary care had to be taken with live/armed bombs.

            Before shipping to the units the bladders were encased in protective metal shells because otherwise they could stick to anything they touched. Those shells fell off as soon as the pin was pulled immediately prior to launch.

            The goal was to break the bladder upon impact on the tank hull so that the thick nitroglycerin syrup could pour over the tank immediately prior to detonating. This produced the best results.

            A very interesting, if awkward concept .

            i'll tell you one thing (if its not a fairy tale) I'm bloody glad we didn't have 'em!!
            'By Horse by Tram'.


            I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
            " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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            • #7
              never seen this sticky, thx for info

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              • #8
                Originally posted by histo View Post
                never seen this sticky, thx for info


                Sticky bombs came to a sticky end when the Jerries started making tanks from the same steel as the 'protective metal shell' of the bombs!

                The long toll of the brave
                Is not lost in darkness
                Over the fruitful earth
                And athwart the seas
                Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                Unquenchable forever.

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                • #9
                  Yup, the army rejected it but Winnie liked it and some were issued to the Home Guard.

                  One of the stupidest weapons ever made.
                  Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

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                  • #10
                    Can any of our scholars put to rest the question of the sticky bombs in SPR?
                    Last edited by Listy; 15 Mar 10, 14:13.
                    Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

                    That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Rojik View Post
                      Can any of our scholars put to rest the question of the sticky bombs in SPR?
                      Have a look at Gammon Bombs. Also one does have to ask how a blast on the wheel would knacker the tracks.

                      PS: Bugger, wrong button! Quote is right next to Edit... Sorry.
                      Winnie says
                      ---------------------------------
                      "He fell out of a Gestapo car, over a bridge, and onto a railway line. Then was run over by the Berlin Express.

                      It was an Accident."
                      Herr Flick.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Rojik View Post
                        Can any of our scholars put to rest the question of the sticky bombs in SPR?
                        The closest allied weapon to the weapon used in SPR is as Listy mentioned the Gammon bomb, which was a cloth bag in which you put in as much high explosive as you required. However, it wasn't sticky and it had an impact fuse not a time fuse, so it wasn't the weapon used in SPR.

                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gammon_bomb

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                        • #13
                          French resistance have made some stinky bombs with smelling cheese but germans loved them... with champagne.

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