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Defecting Allied Pilots

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  • Defecting Allied Pilots

    I heard that there was a Czechoslovak pilot by the name of Augustin Preucil that went over to the Germans. He was in the pre-war Czech Air Force. After the German Occupation he tried to go to Poland. he was captured by the Gestapo and aggreed to spy for them. He "escaped" to Poland again with the help of the Gestapo.He became a member of the Czech Air Force in exile in Poland , France and then Great Britain. He became a member of 310 Squadron. As a member of the 55 OTU he defected with his Hurricane in 1941. The Polish pupil with him thought he crashed in the sea. He flew to Belgium. The Gestapo in Prauge got information from him on the Czech pilots in Great Britain. He was later executed as a traitor in 1947.And I know that some Slovaks and Rumainians switched sides to the Soviets and the Italians to the Allies. Any other Allied pilots or aircrew go over to the Germans or Soviets? IIRC there was a MiG-3 that was flown by a Ukrainian defector to Melitopol airport in December 1941. It was eventually repossessed by the Soviets (by then Rumanian allies) in September, 1944. Not exactly defecting but there is also the story of Vladimir Krisko. He first served in the Czechoslovakian Air Force. Then flew in the Slovak Air Force serving on the Eastern Front against the Soviets.He then flew against the USAAF in Slovakia. In Aug 44 he joined the Anti-German Slovak National Uprising and flew against the Germans. After the collapse of the uprising he stayed in Slovakia and served with the partisans till the Soviets arrived. Post-war he served again in the Czechoslovakian Air Force. He was later removed because he had fought against the Soviets. At least two Rumanian pilots defected to the Germans after Romania switched sides in 1944. On March 25, 1945, Aurelian Barbici and Virgil Angelescu flew their Bf 109s to the Luftwaffe base at Trentschin, encouraged by an appeal to defect from a German propaganda radio broadcast. Barbici retuned to Rumania after the war, claiming that he had been shot down and taken prisoner.
    Were there any other Allied pilots that defected to the other side? Also Did any Axis Planes or aircrew fly to neutral countries to be interned? Robert
    Last edited by JCFalkenbergIII; 01 Mar 10, 16:21.
    For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman

  • #2
    Its hard to belive that some allied pilots would fly fro the enemy. Though as in most wars there will be somebody who swiches sides.
    In this world nothing is certain but death and taxes
    - Benjamin Franklin, U.S. statesman, author, and scientist

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Booy View Post
      Its hard to belive that some allied pilots would fly fro the enemy. Though as in most wars there will be somebody who swiches sides.
      There was Second Lieutenant Martin James Monti, USAAF . Though as far as I know he never flew against the US.

      Martin James Monti (Born 1910) US Airman, who enlisted in the USAAF as a pilot and was at the rank of second lieutenant when he defected to Germany, taking his P-38 Lightning aircraft {#44-23725 used by KG 200 as "T9+MK") and landing at Milan on October 13,1944. Monti gave propaganda speeches on German radio, using the alias "Martin Wiethaupt", but was regarded as a poor broadcaster and little used.


      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_James_Monti

      http://www.justicelearning.org/justi...neEventID=1877

      "http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=310Second Lieutenant Martin James Monti (born 1910 in St Louis of an Italian-Swiss father and German mother) went AWOL Oct 1944, travelled from Karachi to Naples (through Cairo and Tripoli) where he stole a F-4 or F-5 photographic reconnaissance aircraft (photo recon version of the P-38) and flew to Milan. There he surrendered, or rather defected, to the Germans and worked as a propaganda broadcaster (as Martin Wiethaupt) before entering the Waffen-SS as a SS-Untersturmführer in SS-Standarte Kurt Eggers. At the end of the war he went south to Italy where he surrendered to US forces (still wearing his SS uniform) claiming that he had been given the uniform by partisans. He was charged with desertion and sentenced to 15 years hard labour. This sentence was soon commuted and Monti rejoined the US Air Corps, but in 1948 he was discharged and picked up by the FBI. He was now charged with treason and sentenced to 25 years the following year. He was paroled in 1960."

      http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=310
      For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman

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      • #4
        "The Germans had an advantage over the Slovaks in that they were semi-prepared for resistance while the Slovaks had to move prematurely. Much of the Air Force Group defected to the Soviets on 31 August. Notably they included the two Gustavs, the two surviving Bf 109Es, four B-534s, one Bk-534, and seven S-328s, but a few remained behind."

        http://web.archive.org/web/200712100.../Slovakaf.html

        I had heard too that a Soviet pilot defected in a Yak-9 to Switzerland. He was handed back to them postwar. Robert
        Last edited by JCFalkenbergIII; 02 Mar 10, 20:25.
        For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JCFalkenbergIII View Post
          There was Second Lieutenant Martin James Monti, USAAF . Though as far as I know he never flew against the US.

          Martin James Monti (Born 1910) US Airman, who enlisted in the USAAF as a pilot and was at the rank of second lieutenant when he defected to Germany, taking his P-38 Lightning aircraft {#44-23725 used by KG 200 as "T9+MK") and landing at Milan on October 13,1944. Monti gave propaganda speeches on German radio, using the alias "Martin Wiethaupt", but was regarded as a poor broadcaster and little used.
          Man why defect in late 1944 when the war was pretty clearly going against the axis.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Booy View Post
            Its hard to belive that some allied pilots would fly fro the enemy. Though as in most wars there will be somebody who swiches sides.
            Depends on the circumstances...and during war, especially when your country is under enemy occupation, ANYTHING can happen. The stakes could have been anything...could have been money, maybe their lives, maybe the lives of their family even.

            So another question would be...if an enemy power was in control of your country, and their agents held guns to your family's heads, what would you do to save them?
            You'll live, only the best get killed.

            -General Charles de Gaulle

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            • #7
              Originally posted by asterix View Post
              Depends on the circumstances...and during war, especially when your country is under enemy occupation, ANYTHING can happen. The stakes could have been anything...could have been money, maybe their lives, maybe the lives of their family even.

              So another question would be...if an enemy power was in control of your country, and their agents held guns to your family's heads, what would you do to save them?
              Well certainly that certainly didn't apply to Second Lieutenant Martin James Monti . Robert
              For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman

              Comment


              • #8
                I know that some Slovaks and Romainians switched sides to the Soviets and the Italians to the Allies. Any other Allied pilots or aircrew go over to the Germans or Soviets? Also Did any Axis Planes or aircrew fly to neutral countries to be interned? IIRC there was a MiG-3 that was flown by a Ukrainian defector to Melitopol airport in December 1941. It was eventually repossessed by the Soviets (by then Rumanian allies) in September, 1944. Not exactly defecting but there is also the story of Vladimir Krisko. He first served in the Czechoslovakian Air Force. Then flew in the Slovak Air Force serving on the Eastern Front against the Soviets.He then flew against the USAAF in Slovakia. In Aug 44 he joined the Anti-German Slovak National Uprising and flew against the Germans. After the collapse of the uprising he stayed in Slovakia and served with the partisans till the Soviets arrived. Post-war he served again in the Czechoslovakian Air Force. He was later removed because he had fought against the Soviets. At least two Rumanian pilots defected to the Germans after Romania switched sides in 1944. On March 25, 1945, Aurelian Barbici and Virgil Angelescu flew their Bf 109s to the Luftwaffe base at Trentschin, encouraged by an appeal to defect from a German propaganda radio broadcast. Barbici returned to Rumania after the war, claiming that he had been shot down and taken prisoner.

                Robert
                For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman

                Comment


                • #9
                  Looks like so far more Axis pilots and crew were the ones to defect. Robert
                  For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman

                  Comment

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