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Lets Pay Our Respects To The D-day Vets

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  • Lets Pay Our Respects To The D-day Vets

    I SUGGEST THAT THIS THREAD WOULD BE FOR PEOPLE TO PAY THEIR RESPECTS TO THE MEN WHO PARTICIPATED IN D-DAY.
    IN EVERYONES OWN WAY.
    BE IT A BIT OF INTERESTING HISTORY.
    A STORY OF YOUR GRANDFATHER, OR ANYBODY YOU KNEW WHO HAS OR HAD A STORY ABOUT D-DAY.
    A POEM.
    A PHOTOGRAPH.
    OR ANYTHING THAT COMES TO MIND.
    PLEASE LET US KEEP THIS ONE RESPECTFUL, THE HUMOUR WITHIN GOOD TASTE, AND FREE OF DISPUTE.
    EVERY MAN OF EVERY NATION OF THE ALLIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE WAS A HERO, AND WE OWE OUR LIVES AS THEY ARE TO THEM.
    THIS THREAD IS FOR THEM.
    Last edited by 17poundr; 25 Feb 06, 07:15.
    "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

    If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

  • #2
    When visiting the WWII memorial yesterday I was struck by sadness looking at the gold stars lining the walls!!

    Thanks

    CURRAHEE
    Peter Williams

    "We're not lost private, we're in Normandy"-

    Lt. Richard Winters 101st 506 pir

    Comment


    • #3
      Here's a nice Canadian perspective...

      Brad

      Our Freedom Is Not Free
      By WALTER ROBINSON -- Ottawa Sun


      Tomorrow we will pause with heavy hearts for two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. to honour more than 1.7 million Canadian soldiers -- women and men -- who left our shores to serve in one (or both) of the two world wars, Korea and/or 40-plus peacekeeping missions since 1950.

      Canada entered World War I -- the war to end all wars -- at its outset in 1914. Upon signing of the armistice four years later on Nov. 11, 1918, more than 626,000 soldiers had served, 61,663 Canadians had given their lives and another 174,623 were wounded for our freedom.

      By the start of World War II in 1939, more than 58,000 Canadians had volunteered for armed service. By the end of the war -- six long years later -- in 1945, more than 1.1 million Canadians had served in our forces with another 42,042 paying the ultimate price from Europe to Hong Kong for our freedom and 54,414 coming home wounded and/or permanently disabled.

      26,000 served

      The Korean War saw 26,000 Canadians serve under the United Nations banner with 516 losing their lives in combat and 1,567 wounded. And we shouldn't forget the more than 118 deaths of Canadian peacekeepers -- including four friendly fire deaths and two landmine fatalities in Afghanistan in the last two years -- out of 100,000 soldiers who have served to keep and make the peace for over half a century.

      When we count the graves, 104,343 Canadians died over the last 85 years in defence of our freedom and way of life. Here's what this sacrifice, their sacrifice, means in a typical day -- each and every day -- of our lives.

      Your alarm clock goes off at 5:30 a.m. blaring out the latest tunes. Artists are free to record what they want; we have a plethora of station choices, thanks to their sacrifice.

      A quick stretch and out you go for a morning run. No armed guards on your street corner, no restricted zones in your neighbourhood, thanks to their sacrifice.

      After a shower and quick breakfast -- no food rations thanks to their sacrifice -- you top up your tank with gas. Again, no gas rations and the freedom to drive where you want and work for whom you want -- thanks to their sacrifice. Or if you take the bus to work, you sit with people of all colours from all over the world whom we welcome here -- thanks to their sacrifice.

      At the office you scan (well I do) the newspaper or channel-surf the TV and countless opinions are offered up for and against the latest corporate merger or analysis supporting this policy thrust or criticizing that politician -- thanks to their sacrifice.

      Over lunch you debate local politics with a colleague, pick up the latest bestselling paperback or simply soak up the late fall sun in quiet reflection in complete freedom with no fear of what you say, who might hear you or who may be watching -- thanks to their sacrifice.

      Back to work for an all-afternoon conference call hashing out the latest corporate strategy with reps in three other cities with no fear of being bugged or shut down by the authorities -- thanks to their sacrifice.

      Thanks to their sacrifice

      Back to the burbs it's time to get the kids from school, drop them at basketball practice or the local music group, catch up on a few missed calls ... all before dinner -- thanks to their sacrifice.

      After dinner and getting the kids to bed you're off to the local community association meeting planning a new playground or local charity fundraiser -- thanks to their sacrifice.

      Then late in the evening you spend some quiet time with your wife, husband or partner or by yourself before calling it a night and flaking out or plowing into that paperback you bought at lunch or reflecting on your day in quiet prayer to whatever you call your God -- thanks to their sacrifice.

      By all means, tomorrow, please remember them. And try to remember them every day ... indeed the conduct of your daily lives -- both good and bad, such is the nature of freedom -- is in one sense a testament to their sacrifice.

      And before you go to bed tonight, spare a few thoughts for the families of 3,678 soldiers stationed across the globe in ongoing missions. These missions include 229 contributing to the fight against terrorism in and around the Middle East and four operations personnel in Tampa; 1,996 soldiers in Afghanistan, including members of JTF2; 1,192 soldiers in Bosnia-Herzegovina; 232 forces personnel in the Golan Heights, Cyprus, Jerusalem and the Sinai; and 25 Canadians in Africa including the Congo, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Senegal.

      These women and men -- both living and dead -- represent the best that our country has to offer because of their historic and ongoing living sacrifice.

      In April 1915, 1,000 Canadians died from poison gas -- the first instance of its use in the history of war -- at the second battle of Ypres in Belgium. This was the catalyst which led Dr. John McCrae to write his epic poem In Flanders Fields.

      Let's collectively pray that future events never again inspire another poem like it and never forget: Our freedom is not free.
      "We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free."- Ronald Reagan at the D-Day Anniversary

      http://www.imagestation.com/picture/...7/fe0df62e.jpg

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't believe that anyone could articulate our feelings better than Ronald Reagan. Here are the two speeches that he gave on the D-Day anniversaries...

        God bless all who gave their lives on that day and to their families who lost loved ones. We cannot express our gratitude enough.

        Brad

        ______________________________________


        Ronald Reagan -- Pointe de Hoc, Normandy, June 6, 1984 (The 40th anniversary of D-Day)
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        We're here to mark that day in history when the Allied peoples joined in battle to reclaim this continent to liberty. For four long years, much of Europe had been under a terrible shadow. Free nations had fallen, Jews cried out in the camps, millions cried out for liberation. Europe was enslaved, and the world prayed for its rescue. Here in Normandy the rescue began. Here the Allies stood and fought against tyranny in a giant undertaking unparalleled in human history.

        We stand on a lonely, windswept point on the northern shore of France. The air is soft, but forty years ago at this moment, the air was dense with smoke and the cries of men, and the air was filled with the crack of rifle fire and the roar of cannon. At dawn, on the morning of the 6th of June 1944, 225 Rangers jumped off the British landing craft and ran to the bottom of these cliffs. Their mission was one of the most difficult and daring of the invasion: to climb these sheer and desolate cliffs and take out the enemy guns. The Allies had been told that some of the mightiest of these guns were here and they would be trained on the beaches to stop the Allied advance.

        The Rangers looked up and saw the enemy soldiers -- at the edge of the cliffs shooting down at them with machine-guns and throwing grenades. And the American Rangers began to climb. They shot rope ladders over the face of these cliffs and began to pull themselves up. When one Ranger fell, another would take his place.
        When one rope was cut, a Ranger would grab another and begin his climb again. They climbed, shot back, and held their footing. Soon, one by one, the Rangers pulled themselves over the top, and in seizing the firm land at the top of these cliffs, they began to seize back the continent of Europe. Two hundred and twenty-five came here. After two days of fighting only ninety could still bear arms.

        Behind me is a memorial that symbolizes the Ranger daggers that were thrust into the top of these cliffs. And before me are the men who put them there. These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs. These are the champions who helped free a continent. These are the heroes who helped end a war.

        Gentlemen, I look at you and I think of the words of Stephen Spender's poem. You are men who in your 'lives fought for life...and left the vivid air signed with your honor'...

        Forty summers have passed since the battle that you fought here. You were young the day you took these cliffs; some of you were hardly more than boys, with the deepest joys of life before you. Yet you risked everything here. Why? Why did you do it? What impelled you to put aside the instinct for self-preservation and risk your lives to take these cliffs? What inspired all the men of the armies that met here? We look at you, and somehow we know the answer. It was faith, and belief; it was loyalty and love.

        The men of Normandy had faith that what they were doing was right, faith that they fought for all humanity, faith that a just God would grant them mercy on this beachhead or on the next. It was the deep knowledge -- and pray God we have not lost it -- that there is a profound moral difference between the use of force for liberation and the use of force for conquest. You were here to liberate, not to conquer, and so you and those others did not doubt your cause. And you were right not to doubt.

        You all knew that some things are worth dying for. One's country is worth dying for, and democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man. All of you loved liberty. All of you were willing to fight tyranny, and you knew the people of your countries were behind you.

        Address at the U.S.-French Ceremony at Omaha Beach on the 40th Anniversary of D-Day.


        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        President Ronald Reagan, June 6, 1984. Normandy, France.
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        We stand today at a place of battle, one that 40 years ago saw and felt the worst of war. Men bled and died here for a few feet of - or inches of sand, as bullets and shellfire cut through their ranks. About them, General Omar Bradley later said, "Every man who set foot on Omaha Beach that day was a hero."

        Some who survived the battle of June 6, 1944, are here today. Others who hoped to return never did. "Someday, Lis, I'll go back," said Private First Class Peter Robert Zannata, of the 37th Engineer Combat Battalion, and first assault wave to hit Omaha Beach. "I'll go back, and I'll see it all again. I'll see the beach, the barricades, and the graves."

        Those words of Private Zanatta come to us from his daughter, Lisa Zanatta Henn, in a heart-rending story about the event her father spoke of so often. "In his words, the Normandy invasion would change his life forever," she said. She tells some of his stories of World War II but says of her father, "the story to end all stories was D-Day."

        "He made me feel the fear of being on the boat waiting to land. I can smell the ocean and feel the sea sickness. I can see the looks on his fellow soldiers' faces-the fear, the anguish, the uncertainty of what lay ahead. And when they landed, I can feel the strength and courage of the men who took those first steps through the tide to what must have surely looked like instant death."

        Private Zannata's daughter wrote to me, "I don't know how or why I can feel this emptiness, this fear, or this determination, but I do. Maybe it's the bond I had with my father. All I know is that it brings tears to my eyes to think about my father as a 20-year old boy having to face that beach."

        The anniversary of D-Day was always special to her family. And like all the families of those who went to war, she describes how she came to realize her own father's survival was a miracle: "So many men died. I know that my father watched many of his friends be killed. I know that he must have died inside a little each time.
        But his explanation to me was, `You did what you had to do, and you kept on going." When men like Private Zannata and all our Allied forces stormed the beaches of Normandy 40 years ago they came not as conquerors, but as liberators. When these troops swept across the French countryside and into the forests of Belgium and Luxembourg they came not to take, but to return what had been wrongfully seized. When our forces marched into Germany they came not to prey on a brave and defeated people, but to nurture the seeds of democracy among those who yearned to bee free again.

        We salute them today. But, Mr. President [Francois Mitterand of France], we also salute those who, like yourself, were already engaging the enemy inside your beloved country-the French Resistance. Your valiant struggle for France did so much to cripple the enemy and spur the advance of the armies of liberation. The French Forces of the Interior will forever personify courage and national spirit. They will be a timeless inspiration to all who are free and to all who would be free.

        Today, in their memory, and for all who fought here, we celebrate the triumph of democracy. We reaffirm the unity of democratic people who fought a war and then joined with the vanquished in a firm resolve to keep the peace.

        From a terrible war we learned that unity made us invincible; now, in peace, that same unity makes us secure. We sought to bring all freedom-loving nations together in a community dedicated to the defense and preservation of our sacred values. Our alliance, forged in the crucible of war, tempered and shaped by the realities of the post-war world, has succeeded. In Europe, the threat has been contained, the peace has been kept.

        Today, the living here assembled-officials, veterans, citizens-are a tribute to what was achieved here 40 years ago. This land is secure. We are free. These things are worth fighting and dying for.

        Lisa Zannata Henn began her story by quoting her father, who promised that he would return to Normandy. She ended with a promise to her father, who died 8 years ago of cancer: "I'm going there, Dad, and I'll see the beaches and the barricades and the monuments. I'll see the graves, and I'll put flowers there just like you wanted to do. I'll never forget what you went through, Dad, nor will I let any one else forget. And, Dad, I'll always be proud."

        Through the words of his loving daughter, who is here with us today, a D-Day veteran has shown us the meaning of this day far better than any President can. It is enough to say about Private Zannata and all the men of honor and courage who fought beside him four decades ago: We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free.

        Thank you.

        ------------------
        "We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free."- Ronald Reagan at the D-Day Anniversary

        http://www.imagestation.com/picture/...7/fe0df62e.jpg

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Viper 10
          Here's a nice Canadian perspective...

          Brad

          Our Freedom Is Not Free
          By WALTER ROBINSON -- Ottawa Sun


          Tomorrow we will pause with heavy hearts for two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. to honour more than 1.7 million Canadian soldiers -- women and men -- who left our shores to serve in one (or both) of the two world wars, Korea and/or 40-plus peacekeeping missions since 1950.

          Canada entered World War I -- the war to end all wars -- at its outset in 1914. Upon signing of the armistice four years later on Nov. 11, 1918, more than 626,000 soldiers had served, 61,663 Canadians had given their lives and another 174,623 were wounded for our freedom.

          By the start of World War II in 1939, more than 58,000 Canadians had volunteered for armed service. By the end of the war -- six long years later -- in 1945, more than 1.1 million Canadians had served in our forces with another 42,042 paying the ultimate price from Europe to Hong Kong for our freedom and 54,414 coming home wounded and/or permanently disabled.

          26,000 served

          The Korean War saw 26,000 Canadians serve under the United Nations banner with 516 losing their lives in combat and 1,567 wounded. And we shouldn't forget the more than 118 deaths of Canadian peacekeepers -- including four friendly fire deaths and two landmine fatalities in Afghanistan in the last two years -- out of 100,000 soldiers who have served to keep and make the peace for over half a century.

          When we count the graves, 104,343 Canadians died over the last 85 years in defence of our freedom and way of life. Here's what this sacrifice, their sacrifice, means in a typical day -- each and every day -- of our lives.

          Your alarm clock goes off at 5:30 a.m. blaring out the latest tunes. Artists are free to record what they want; we have a plethora of station choices, thanks to their sacrifice.

          A quick stretch and out you go for a morning run. No armed guards on your street corner, no restricted zones in your neighbourhood, thanks to their sacrifice.

          After a shower and quick breakfast -- no food rations thanks to their sacrifice -- you top up your tank with gas. Again, no gas rations and the freedom to drive where you want and work for whom you want -- thanks to their sacrifice. Or if you take the bus to work, you sit with people of all colours from all over the world whom we welcome here -- thanks to their sacrifice.

          At the office you scan (well I do) the newspaper or channel-surf the TV and countless opinions are offered up for and against the latest corporate merger or analysis supporting this policy thrust or criticizing that politician -- thanks to their sacrifice.

          Over lunch you debate local politics with a colleague, pick up the latest bestselling paperback or simply soak up the late fall sun in quiet reflection in complete freedom with no fear of what you say, who might hear you or who may be watching -- thanks to their sacrifice.

          Back to work for an all-afternoon conference call hashing out the latest corporate strategy with reps in three other cities with no fear of being bugged or shut down by the authorities -- thanks to their sacrifice.

          Thanks to their sacrifice

          Back to the burbs it's time to get the kids from school, drop them at basketball practice or the local music group, catch up on a few missed calls ... all before dinner -- thanks to their sacrifice.

          After dinner and getting the kids to bed you're off to the local community association meeting planning a new playground or local charity fundraiser -- thanks to their sacrifice.

          Then late in the evening you spend some quiet time with your wife, husband or partner or by yourself before calling it a night and flaking out or plowing into that paperback you bought at lunch or reflecting on your day in quiet prayer to whatever you call your God -- thanks to their sacrifice.

          By all means, tomorrow, please remember them. And try to remember them every day ... indeed the conduct of your daily lives -- both good and bad, such is the nature of freedom -- is in one sense a testament to their sacrifice.

          And before you go to bed tonight, spare a few thoughts for the families of 3,678 soldiers stationed across the globe in ongoing missions. These missions include 229 contributing to the fight against terrorism in and around the Middle East and four operations personnel in Tampa; 1,996 soldiers in Afghanistan, including members of JTF2; 1,192 soldiers in Bosnia-Herzegovina; 232 forces personnel in the Golan Heights, Cyprus, Jerusalem and the Sinai; and 25 Canadians in Africa including the Congo, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Senegal.

          These women and men -- both living and dead -- represent the best that our country has to offer because of their historic and ongoing living sacrifice.

          In April 1915, 1,000 Canadians died from poison gas -- the first instance of its use in the history of war -- at the second battle of Ypres in Belgium. This was the catalyst which led Dr. John McCrae to write his epic poem In Flanders Fields.

          Let's collectively pray that future events never again inspire another poem like it and never forget: Our freedom is not free.
          I'm actually....... speechless. Coming from a newspaper. Couldn't have said it any better. I will post this in my office tonight for all to see and read.
          http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

          Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

          Comment


          • #6
            The Final Inspection



            The soldier stood and faced his God
            Which must always come to pass
            He hoped his shoes were shining
            Just as brightly as his brass

            "Step forward now you soldier,
            How shall I deal with you?
            Have you always turned the other cheek,
            And to my church have you been true?"

            The soldier squared his shoulders and said,
            "No Lord, I guess I ain't,
            Because those of us who carry guns,
            Can't always be saints

            "I've had to work most Sundays
            And at times my talk was tough
            And sometimes I've been violent
            Because the streets were awfully rough"

            But I never took a penny,
            That wasn’t mine to keep
            Though I worked a lot of overtime
            When the bills just got to steep,

            And I never passed a cry for help
            Although, at times I shook with fear
            And sometimes, God forgive
            I've wept unmanly tears

            I know I don't deserve a place
            ]Among the people here
            That never wanted me around
            Except to calm their fears

            If you have a place for me here O' Lord
            It needn't be so grand
            I've never expected, or had so much
            But if you don't I'll understand"

            There was a silence all around the throne
            Where the Saints had often trod
            As this soldier waited quietly
            For the judgment from his God

            "Step forward now you soldier,
            You've borne your burdens well
            Walk peacefully on Heaven's streets,
            You've done your time in Hell"

            To all those who have served;
            "We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free."- Ronald Reagan at the D-Day Anniversary

            http://www.imagestation.com/picture/...7/fe0df62e.jpg

            Comment


            • #7
              Sorry to post so many times. I hope that some of these touch your hearts (as they have mine).

              Brad

              _____________________________________

              Another Canadian perspective...

              America- The Good Neighbor
              TRIBUTE TO THE UNITED STATES

              America: The Good Neighbor.

              Widespread but only partial news coverage was given recently to a remarkable editorial broadcast from Toronto by Gordon Sinclair, a Canadian television commentator. What follows is the full text of his trenchant remarks as printed in the Congressional Record:

              "This Canadian thinks it is time to speak up for the Americans as the most generous and possibly the least appreciated people on all the earth.

              Germany, Japan and, to a lesser extent, Britain and Italy were lifted out of the debris of war by the Americans who poured in billions of dollars and forgave other billions in debts. None of these countries is today paying even the interest on its remaining debts to the United States.

              When France was in danger of collapsing in 1956, it was the Americans who propped it up, and their reward was to be insulted and swindled on the streets of Paris. I was there. I saw it.

              When earthquakes hit distant cities, it is the United States that hurries in to help. This spring, 59 American communities were flattened by tornadoes. Nobody helped.

              The Marshall Plan and the Truman Policy pumped billions of dollars into discouraged countries. Now newspapers in those countries are writing about the decadent, warmongering Americans.

              I'd like to see just one of those countries that is gloating over the erosion of the United States dollar build its own airplane. Does any other country in the world have a plane to equal the Boeing Jumbo Jet, the Lockheed Tri-Star, or the Douglas DC10? If so, why don't they fly them? Why do all the International lines except Russia fly American Planes?

              Why does no other land on earth even consider putting a man or woman on the moon? You talk about Japanese technocracy, and you get radios. You talk about German technocracy, and you get automobiles.

              You talk about American technocracy, and you find men on the moon - not once, but several times - and safely home again.

              You talk about scandals, and the Americans put theirs right in the store window for everybody to look at . Even their draft-dodgers are not pursued and hounded. They are here on our streets, and most of them, unless they are breaking Canadian laws, are getting American dollars from ma and pa at home to spend here.

              When the railways of France, Germany and India were breaking down through age, it was the Americans who rebuilt them. When the Pennsylvania Railroad and the New York Central went broke, nobody loaned them an old caboose. Both are still broke.

              I can name you 5000 times when the Americans raced to the help of other people in trouble. Can you name me even one time when someone else raced to the Americans in trouble? I don't think there was outside help even during the San Francisco earthquake.

              Our neighbors have faced it alone, and I'm one Canadian who is damned tired of hearing them get kicked around. They will come out of this thing with their flag high. And when they do, they are entitled to thumb their nose at the lands that are gloating over their present troubles. I hope Canada is not one of those."

              Stand proud, America!
              "We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free."- Ronald Reagan at the D-Day Anniversary

              http://www.imagestation.com/picture/...7/fe0df62e.jpg

              Comment


              • #8
                Here is some background on this radio broadcast and the author.

                Brad

                ____________________________

                The True Story of how “The Americans” came to be and the magnificent events that followed its original broadcast
                ~~~o~~~
                On June 5, 1973, Gordon Sinclair sat up in bed in Toronto and turned on his TV set. The United States had just pulled out of the Vietnamese War which had ended in a stalemate – a war fought daily on TV, over the radio and in the press. The aftermath of that war resulted in a world-wide sell-off of American investments, prices tumbled, the United States economy was in trouble. The war had also divided the American people, and at home and abroad it seemed everyone was lambasting the United States.

                He turned on his radio, twisted the dial and turned it off. He picked up the morning paper. In print, he saw in headlines what he had found on TV and radio - the Americans were taking a verbal beating from nations around the world. Disgusted with what he saw and heard, he was outraged!

                At 10:30, on his arrival at CFRB to prepare his two pre-noon broadcasts, he strode into his office and “dashed-off” two pages in 20 minutes for LET’S BE PERSONAL at 11:45 am, and then turned to writing his 11:50 newscast that was to follow. At 12:01 pm, the script for LET’S BE PERSONAL was dropped on the desk of his secretary who scanned the pages for a suitable heading and then wrote “Americans”” across the top and filed it away. The phones were already ringing.

                Gordon Sinclair could not have written a book that could have had a greater impact in the world than his two-page script for THE AMERICANS. A book should have been written on the events that followed. But, no one at CFRB, including Sinclair himself, could have envisioned the reaction of the people of the United States - from presidents - state governors - Congress – the Senate - all media including TV, radio, newspapers, magazines - and from the “ordinary” American on the street. Nor, could have the Canadian government - stunned by the response to
                what has come to be regarded as one of Canada’s greatest public relations feats in the history of our relations with the United States of America.

                But, how did Sinclair’s tribute to Americans reach them? It had been swept across the United States at the speed of a prairie fire by American radio stations - first, a station in Buffalo called and asked to be fed a tape copy of the broadcast with permission to use - both freely given. Nearby American stations obtained copies from Buffalo or called direct. By the time it reached the Washington, DC area, a station had superimposed Sinc’s broadcast over an instrumental version of BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER, and was repeating it at fixed times several times-a-day.
                Congressmen and Senators heard it. It was read several times into the Congressional Record. Assuming that it was on a phono (33 1/3 rpm), Americans started a search for a copy. CFRB was contacted. To satisfy the demand, CFRB started to make arrangements with AVCO, an American record company, to manufacture and distribute it as a “single”.

                As they were finalizing a contract that would see all royalties which would normally be due Gordon Sinclair be paid (at his request) to the American Red Cross. Word was received that an unauthorized record, using Sinclair’s script but read by another broadcaster, was already flooding the US market. (Subsequently, on learning that this broadcaster had agreed to turn over his royalties to the Red Cross, no legal action was taken).

                Sinclair’s recording of his own work (to which Avco had added a stirring rendition of THE BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC) did finally reach record stores, and sold hundreds of thousands of copies, but the potential numbers were depressed by the sale of the infringing record. Other record producers and performers (including Tex Ritter) obtained legal permission to make their own versions. In Ritter’s case, because of the first-person style of the script, Tex preceded his performance with a proper credit to Sinclair as the author. The American Red Cross received millions of dollars in royalties, and Gordon Sinclair was present at a special ceremony acknowledging his donation.

                Advertisers using print media contacted CFRB for permission to publish the text in a non-commercial manner; industrial plants asked for the right to print the script in leaflet form to handout to their employees. Gordon Sinclair received invitations to attend and be honoured at many functions in the United States which, by number and due to family health problems at the time, he had to decline. However, CFRB newscaster Charles Doering, was flown to Washington to give a public reading of THE AMERICANS to the 28th National Convention of the United States Air Force Association, held September 18, 1974 at the Sheraton Park Hotel. His presentation was performed with the on-stage backing of the U.S. Air Force Concert Band, joined by the 100-voice Singing Sergeants in a special arrangement of The Battle Hymn of the Republic. 8 years after the first broadcast of THE AMERICANS, U.S. President Ronald Reagan made his first official visit to Canada. At the welcoming ceremonies on Parliament Hill, the new President praised “the Canadian journalist who wrote that (tribute)” to the United States when it needed a
                friend. Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau had Sinclair flown to Ottawa to be his guest at the reception that evening.
                Sinc had a long and pleasant conversation with Mr. Reagan. The President told him that he had a copy of the record of THE AMERICANS at his California ranch home when he was governor of the state, and played it from time to time when things looked gloomy. On the evening of May 15th, 1984, following a regular day’s broadcasting, Gordon Sinclair suffered a heart attack. He died on May 17th. As the word of his illness spread throughout the
                United States, calls inquiring about his condition had been received from as far away as Texas. The editorial in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune of May 28th was typical of the reaction of the United
                States news media - A GOOD FRIEND PASSES ON.

                U.S. President Ronald Reagan: “I know I speak for all Americans in saying the radio editorial Gordon wrote in 1973 praising the accomplishments of the United States was a wonderful inspiration. It was not only critics abroad who forgot this nation’s many great achievements, but even critics here at home. Gordon Sinclair reminded us to take pride in our nation’s fundamental values.”

                Former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau: “Gordon Sinclair’s death ends one of the longest and most remarkable careers in Canadian Journalism. His wit, irreverence, bluntness and off-beat views have been part of the media landscape for so long that many Canadians had come to believe he would always be there.”

                Following a private family service, two thousand people from all walks of life filled Nathan Phillips Square in front of Toronto’s City Hall for a public service of remembrance organized by Mayor Art Eggleton. Dignitaries joining him on the platform were Ontario Lieutenant-Governor, John Black Aird; the Premier of Ontario, William Davis; and Metro Chairman Paul Godfrey. Tens of thousands more joined them through CFRB’s live broadcast of the service which began symbolically at 11:45 - the regular time of Sinc’s daily broadcast of LET’S BE PERSONAL.
                As Ontario Premier William Davis said of him “The name GORDON SINCLAIR could become the classic definition of a full life.”
                "We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free."- Ronald Reagan at the D-Day Anniversary

                http://www.imagestation.com/picture/...7/fe0df62e.jpg

                Comment


                • #9
                  Here's my tribute, because sometimes words aren't enough.

                  Dr. S.
                  Attached Files
                  Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

                  www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

                  www.tabletown.co.uk

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                  • #10
                    thankyou

                    thankyou from my heart, I dont know what time the Canadian memorial will be in Finland but I will give those men a silent moment of my own.
                    and the speech, made me speechless. I got all misty eyed now.
                    and will have to stop.


                    here is my thought.

                    Those men in the flower of their youth came from over the atlantic, or just across the channell, but they came, they could have chosen to stay, It would have been easy, and without all the horror and mutilation, and seeing your friend bleed to death.
                    But they came, and right now, on this internet site, we are reaping the fruits of their sacrifice.
                    How I love those men.
                    Amen.
                    Last edited by 17poundr; 25 Feb 06, 07:15.
                    "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

                    If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

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                    • #11
                      Remember the Allies who fell on that day, but don't forget about the Germans as well.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by nreese21
                        Remember the Allies who fell on that day, but don't forget about the Germans as well.
                        Yes you're right.
                        http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

                        Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

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                        • #13
                          my most humble thanks to the veterans of D-Day!
                          God bless!

                          Robert Capra, photographer:
                          Attached Files
                          All your ACG posts are belong to us!

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                          • #14
                            to the airmen that fought on d-day (all nations).

                            This poem is for the airmen, and para's and glider tug pilots, basically anybody that flew in the air on that day.
                            It was written by a Canadian fighter pilot during the battle of britain, who tragically died shortly after writing it. So it is a powerful piece of ww2 memorabilia.
                            And I think it a fitting poem for all those who served in the air of europe, especially on d-day( and I respect those german airmen too), who made a low level attack just with two planes! what courage. Infact, they flew so low on their approach to the beach, that on return (walther kuprinsky, I think, sorry if i spelt his name wrong), the pilot noticed the ends of his propeller were bended, thats how low he flied! He had been touching the ground with his prop! Now that was courage.
                            This I wanted to say to the relative of Field Marshall Rommel.
                            But, back to the subject.
                            The poem is called: 'An airmans extacy'.

                            Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
                            And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
                            Sunward I have climbed and joined the tumbling mirth
                            Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things
                            You have not dreamed of - wheeled and
                            Soared and swung
                            High in the sunlit silence. Hovering there,
                            I've chased the shouting wind along,
                            And flung
                            My eager craft through footless halls of air.
                            Up, up the long, delirious, burning blue
                            I've topped the windswept heights with easy grace
                            Where never lark, or even eagle flew.
                            And, while with silent, lifting mind I've trod
                            the high untrespassed sanctity of space,
                            Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.
                            Last edited by 17poundr; 25 Feb 06, 07:15.
                            "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

                            If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

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                            • #15
                              Semper Fi! Carry On! :armed:


                              (Even though there were no marines on D-Day)

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