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Record price paid for a WWII Victoria Cross.

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  • Record price paid for a WWII Victoria Cross.

    A Victoria Cross awarded to an RAF airman in WWII has been auctioned - for (get this) 235,000.00.

    A link:

    Record price for Victoria Cross



    Dr. S.
    Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

    www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

    www.tabletown.co.uk

  • #2
    Lots of money thats for sure, but what a story on why it was awarded. Crawling out on the wing of a bomber, very brave.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, it was pretty extreme. Hats off to the man awarded the medal, but I still dunno why it went for so much - it's not like the bravery or the kudos gets transferred to the new owner.

      Hey-ho.

      Dr. S.
      Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

      www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

      www.tabletown.co.uk

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Record price paid for a WWII Victoria Cross.

        Originally posted by Doctor Sinister
        A Victoria Cross awarded to an RAF airman in WWII has been auctioned - for (get this) 235,000.00.

        A link:

        Record price for Victoria Cross



        Dr. S.
        Dr S.,

        You are the master of British arcania!!!!!!:thumb:

        A very interesting story.
        Lance W.

        Peace through superior firepower.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Record price paid for a WWII Victoria Cross.

          Originally posted by Doctor Sinister
          A Victoria Cross awarded to an RAF airman in WWII has been auctioned - for (get this) 235,000.00.

          A link:

          Record price for Victoria Cross



          Dr. S.
          It's sad that when a hero or his family is forced to put a medal up for sale.

          Cheers!


          Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

          "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

          What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Re: Record price paid for a WWII Victoria Cross.

            Originally posted by RStory
            It's sad that when a hero or his family is forced to put a medal up for sale.

            Cheers!


            Exactly. I am disappointed that the medal will not stay in the family and was sold off to a collector I'm assuming.
            http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

            Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

            Comment


            • #7
              It would be a shame if the family HAD to sell it.
              I agree about the comment about Doctor S. ...........keeping us informed over here!

              At least the guy awarded this medal didnt throw his "ribbons" over the Capitol wall......like somebody whose name rhymes with "Kerry" did. ..........

              Mark
              Deo Vindice
              Si vis pacem, para bellum. (If you want peace, prepare for war.)

              Comment


              • #8
                I have my Grandfather's WWI medals. An M.C. and DSO with bar.
                Also 1915 Star + General Service medals.

                I had them valued about 20 years ago. They were worth about 400. 00 pounds then.

                They could have been worth more but the originals were lost in a fire and these are replacements.
                http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Wolfe Tone
                  I have my Grandfather's WWI medals. An M.C. and DSO with bar.
                  Also 1915 Star + General Service medals.

                  I had them valued about 20 years ago. They were worth about 400. 00 pounds then.

                  They could have been worth more but the originals were lost in a fire and these are replacements.
                  But the sentimental/historical value to you and your family is probably incalculable - yes?

                  Dr. S.
                  Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

                  www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

                  www.tabletown.co.uk

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    About 12 years ago my father lost all his Korean War medals in a fire. My brother, who was in the military at the time, managed to procure some replacements for him. They are now mounted under glass at my parent's house.
                    I couldn't even imagine selling them..............ever.
                    Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tigersqn
                      About 12 years ago my father lost all his Korean War medals in a fire. My brother, who was in the military at the time, managed to procure some replacements for him. They are now mounted under glass at my parent's house.
                      I couldn't even imagine selling them..............ever.
                      Same with my dad's. He didn't have many medals except the Air Force Commendation medal, but he did have a Combat Infantryman's Badge and his campaign medals. None of which are for sale or rent.

                      Cheers!

                      Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

                      "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

                      What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Doctor Sinister
                        But the sentimental/historical value to you and your family is probably incalculable - yes?

                        Dr. S.
                        Absolutely. I would never part with them.
                        http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm a true believer that medals, when awarded, must remain with the recipient and when he passes on, to his family and so on. Never sell a medal, it's part of the family's history.
                          http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

                          Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dannybou
                            I'm a true believer that medals, when awarded, must remain with the recipient and when he passes on, to his family and so on. Never sell a medal, it's part of the family's history.
                            Absolutely right. The sad thing is that veterans often sell them just so they can have enough money to carry on with life when thgeir families are the ones who should be honouring them by assisting where they can. If I were a veteran and I had to sell my medals, I think I'd start to wonder why I bothered putting my life on the line in the first place for such a society.

                            Dr. S.
                            Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

                            www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

                            www.tabletown.co.uk

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I know how you feel. My Grandpa's medals are many, and although he seems to play down his own heroics in WWII, I know he did some amazing things there.

                              Can't remember all the medals he has, but his Silver star and bronze star are the two major ones, plus a purple heart, and a batch of others.

                              He was a doctor/surgeon with the Big Red One, and served with the artillery regiment if im not mistaken, so heroics were not very prevalent, but he still served in Africa, Italy, Normandy, and the Battle of the Buldge where he was under the scope of a german sniper when he met his brother in another unit, who told him that after the war when they met that the reason he didn't shoot him was because he was under orders not to cause any alarm before the German attack, which was a few days later.

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