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Why didn't Japan attack Russia?

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  • Why didn't Japan attack Russia?

    I'm posting this question here, because it was something that came to my mind as I read some article about the absence of strategic coordination between Germany and Japan.

    So I was wondering, in 1941/2, after sucessfuly invading Manchuria and conquering most of northern and eastern China, why didn't Japan attacked -or simulated some imminent attack- against Russia, in order to take some pressure off the German Eastern Front?

    I can see that Russia was not a priority for Japan, who was looking for acessible raw-materials and readily available processing facilities, of which the western countries' colonies were better "equipped" but surely, the could at least threat to attack, no?

    So, what am I missing here? Was it just something that slipped the Axis Powers' collective mind or is there some good reason for that to have happen?
    JERRY:Vomitting is not a deal breaker. If Hitler had vomitted on Chamberlain, Chamberlain still would have given him Czechoslovakia.

    GEORGE:Chamberlain...you could hold his head in the toilet, he'd still give you half of Europe

    "Seinfeld"

  • #2
    Re: Why didn't Japan attack Russia?

    Originally posted by Pirimeister
    So, what am I missing here? Was it just something that slipped the Axis Powers' collective mind or is there some good reason for that to have happen?
    No the Germans did everything but beg the Japanese to attack. What you are not adding into the thought is that the Japanese had fought a major campaign (1938, I think) against the Soviet Union and Zuikov handed them their head back on a platter.

    2nd, the Soviets spys in Japan lead by Richard Sorge would have known if the Japanese were bluffing.

    If there was one country the Japanese were said to be afraid of it was the Soviet Union.

    Cheers!



    Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

    "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

    What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

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    • #3
      Look up the Khalkhin-Gol Battle (Nomonhan to the Japanese). Basically the Japanese and Russians tangled in the middle of nowhere - and the Japanese got their arses handed to them.

      After that, they wanted nothing to do with the Reds. Besides, there was very little to gain in the short term by invading the vast wasteland of Siberia. They had other concerns elsewhere.
      Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

      I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

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      • #4
        Like Mr. King said, the Japanese were interested in expanding their empire in terms of valuable assets, the Siberian end of Russia contains little in the manner of valuables.
        "War is the extension of politics by other means." - "On War" Carl Von Clauswitz

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        • #5
          I wasn't aware of that japanese fear regarding Russia. So much for that "fearless Samurai" rethoric...

          I thought they were still wearing their "I've been in the Tsushima Strait battle and all I got was this lousy t-shirt" t-shirts proudly.

          Thanks to all who took their time to explane!
          Cheers!
          JERRY:Vomitting is not a deal breaker. If Hitler had vomitted on Chamberlain, Chamberlain still would have given him Czechoslovakia.

          GEORGE:Chamberlain...you could hold his head in the toilet, he'd still give you half of Europe

          "Seinfeld"

          Comment


          • #6
            The 1904-05 War gave them confidence in the 38-39 War. This confidence was soon eroded by the Khalkin and Lake Khasan battles. Russia, however, never trusted the Japanese and kept a sizeable portion of their army in the east waiting for the Japanese to attack. This was the safest duty in the Soviet Army!!
            "Give a soldier an anvil, just a hunk of metal, and drive him out into the desert and leave him. In two weeks - when you go to get him, the anvil will be broken."
            General Creighton Abrams on the need for a soldier proof tank.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tetsuko47
              The 1904-05 War gave them confidence in the 38-39 War. This confidence was soon eroded by the Khalkin and Lake Khasan battles. Russia, however, never trusted the Japanese and kept a sizeable portion of their army in the east waiting for the Japanese to attack. This was the safest duty in the Soviet Army!!
              Till they got transferred to the Moscow Front for the big winter counter attack.


              Cheers!



              Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

              "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

              What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

              Comment


              • #8
                At that time Japan was already at war with China. It's almost dangerous to continue a war on two fronts!!
                Peter Williams

                "We're not lost private, we're in Normandy"-

                Lt. Richard Winters 101st 506 pir

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                • #9
                  While the Germans were treaty-obligated to aid Japan in the event of war against the United States, Japan was under no such obligation in the event of Germany and the USSR tangling.

                  The USSR didn't help much in that theater either, until right at the very end...

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                  • #10
                    Most of the troops who participated in that offensive were in Siberia. The Far East, Central Asian, and (1st and 2nd) Far Eastern Fronts all maintained most of their troops for the duration. Even after the armored divsion was abandoned in the first weeks of the war you can still find them in the Far East.
                    "Give a soldier an anvil, just a hunk of metal, and drive him out into the desert and leave him. In two weeks - when you go to get him, the anvil will be broken."
                    General Creighton Abrams on the need for a soldier proof tank.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      So was there any palpable advantage gained by Gemany and Japan in signing a treaty? I can only see it as a kind of "we have the same enemies, so I guess we're allies" situation.

                      Essential it was merely a political (and I'm not even sure on this) arragement? :quest:
                      JERRY:Vomitting is not a deal breaker. If Hitler had vomitted on Chamberlain, Chamberlain still would have given him Czechoslovakia.

                      GEORGE:Chamberlain...you could hold his head in the toilet, he'd still give you half of Europe

                      "Seinfeld"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Why didn't Japan attack Russia?

                        Originally posted by Pirimeister
                        I'm posting this question here, because it was something that came to my mind as I read some article about the absence of strategic coordination between Germany and Japan.

                        So I was wondering, in 1941/2, after sucessfuly invading Manchuria and conquering most of northern and eastern China, why didn't Japan attacked -or simulated some imminent attack- against Russia, in order to take some pressure off the German Eastern Front?

                        I can see that Russia was not a priority for Japan, who was looking for acessible raw-materials and readily available processing facilities, of which the western countries' colonies were better "equipped" but surely, the could at least threat to attack, no?

                        So, what am I missing here? Was it just something that slipped the Axis Powers' collective mind or is there some good reason for that to have happen?
                        They did, briefly and half-heartedly, most notably at Khalkin-Gol, one of Zhukov's early battles. Apparently, they were somewhat overtaken by the terrain, climate, and Russian tactics.
                        Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
                        (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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                        • #13
                          Between Japan and Germany the Tripartite Pact was exclusively a political contract. Italy gained much more from Germany. Japan never really assisted wither of the main European beligerents either.

                          Japan flirted briefly with Russia in the 38-39 campaign, but never aided Germany in Russia.

                          The Tripartite was signed in 1940 after the Japanese experience with Zhukov and they knew they were not going to "go north" anytime soon.
                          "Give a soldier an anvil, just a hunk of metal, and drive him out into the desert and leave him. In two weeks - when you go to get him, the anvil will be broken."
                          General Creighton Abrams on the need for a soldier proof tank.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RStory
                            Till they got transferred to the Moscow Front for the big winter counter attack.


                            Cheers!



                            Weren't most of the troops that counter attacked at Stalingrad and surrounded Paulus' 6th Army from the Siberian Front?
                            Lance W.

                            Peace through superior firepower.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Lance Williams
                              Weren't most of the troops that counter attacked at Stalingrad and surrounded Paulus' 6th Army from the Siberian Front?
                              The Siberian Front soldiers went to Moscow and took part in the great winter counter-offensive that relieved the city,

                              Cheers!



                              Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

                              "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

                              What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

                              Comment

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