Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Best Admiral of WWII?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Best Admiral of WWII?

    Who was it?
    "It is a fine fox chase, my boys"

    "It is well that war is so terrible-we would grow too fond of it"

  • #2
    I will start off the bidding with Yamamoto.

    Pruitt
    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
      I will start off the bidding with Yamamoto.

      Pruitt
      Midway doesn't count? Nimitz out-maneuvered him there. Or maybe U.S. codebreaking takes something away from him.
      "It is a fine fox chase, my boys"

      "It is well that war is so terrible-we would grow too fond of it"

      Comment


      • #4
        The code breaking is why I have him rated higher than Nimitz and Halsey.

        Pruitt
        Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

        Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

        by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
          I will start off the bidding with Yamamoto.

          Pruitt
          I think the one big argument against Yamamoto that I have is the seemingly systemic Japanese trait of overly complicated plans.

          Anyway, I'll see your Yamamoto and raise you one Fleet Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham.

          Cunningham had a pretty exciting war, even considering his peers:
          • Attacking the ships of a former ally
          • Conducting the first aerial attack on ships in harbor, at Taranto, something the Japanese took note of
          • Winning a good old fashioned gunnery duel at Cape Matapan
          • Conducting an evacuation, at Crete
          • Covering the Malta convoys
          • Conducting an invasion, during Operation Torch
          I mean, that kind of covers the full range of operational types an admiral could expect to deal with, doesn't it?

          Comment


          • #6
            Admiral Raymond Spruance may well have been the best admiral of the war, especially the naval war in the Pacific. He was not an aviator nor a 'carrier' admiral, yet it was he who overwhelmingly won the pivotal battle of Midway, destroying the Japanese naval air arm and its veteran pilots who could not be replaced.
            We are not now that strength which in old days
            Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
            Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
            To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

            Comment


            • #7
              I would say Nimitz, who was also in my view the most successful theater commander of the war, of any branch of service.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Massena View Post
                Admiral Raymond Spruance may well have been the best admiral of the war, especially the naval war in the Pacific. He was not an aviator nor a 'carrier' admiral, yet it was he who overwhelmingly won the pivotal battle of Midway, destroying the Japanese naval air arm and its veteran pilots who could not be replaced.
                I'm thinking Spruance too, at least as far as OTCs and task force commanders go.

                Nimitz was brilliant, but I'm not sure how many of his ideas came from King. If any one individual decided to attack the Solomons and Cental Pacific as simultaneously as possible, then they deserve a lot of credit.

                "It is a fine fox chase, my boys"

                "It is well that war is so terrible-we would grow too fond of it"

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm not so sure about Yamamoto. His strategy seems to have been to draw the Americans into a fleet engagement as soon as possible and wipe them out. He failed: he lost at Midway, and Ghormely and Halsey beat him piecemeal in the Solomons.
                  "It is a fine fox chase, my boys"

                  "It is well that war is so terrible-we would grow too fond of it"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nimitz
                    ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
                    IN MARE IN COELO

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      nimitz
                      Oh Sure The Old Man's Off His Rocker If Grampa Says He's Dead He Must Be Alive
                      Grampa Simpson

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is not my personal view, but "Military History Quarterly" named the Best admiral from ww2 as...……………

                        Karl Doenitz....

                        Yep....no kidding.

                        I'm voting for Ray Spruance, not just for his handling of the carrier fleet, but for keeping out of the way of the interferences of King, and managing to drown out Macarthur's propaganda machine by proving the essential wisdom of the Navy strategy.

                        Could Japan have been defeated by bypassing the Phillippines altogether as Nimitz, Halsey, King and Spruance all seemed to feel?

                        The invasion of the Phillipines and Peleliu seemed to be in response to Macarthur's ideas rather than anyone else.

                        Just how vital was the Phillipines to the Japanese? Their admirals seemed to feel that it meant something, hence their response to the Leyte Landings, but could these forces have been put to better use by supporting at Okinawa instead?

                        They certainly tried their best at the Marshall, but the "Turkey Shoot" seemed to indicate that their carrier strike force was not as ready for action as they first supposed.

                        I dunnow…..

                        But Ray Spruance is my pick, anyway.....who cares about Doenitz or the otherwise great publication of MHQ?
                        My Articles, ALMOST LIVE, exclusive to The Armchair!

                        Soviet Submarines in WW2....The Mythology of Shiloh....(Edited) Both Sides of the Warsaw Ghetto
                        GULAG Glossary....Who Really Killed The Red Baron?....Pearl Harbor At 75
                        Lincoln-Douglas Debates

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          How about Admiral Sir Bertram Ramsay? He brought about the 'miracle' of Dunkirk, was Eastern Task Force Commander for Operation Husky, and was Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Naval Expeditionary Force for Overlord (Operation Neptune). As he had retired from the Royal Navy in 1938, I submit that he did rather well, all things considered.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Massena View Post
                            Admiral Raymond Spruance may well have been the best admiral of the war, especially the naval war in the Pacific. He was not an aviator nor a 'carrier' admiral, yet it was he who overwhelmingly won the pivotal battle of Midway, destroying the Japanese naval air arm and its veteran pilots who could not be replaced.
                            I vote for Nimitz.

                            The Battle of Midway was already won, the dive bombers of VB-3, VB-6, and VS-6 having already worked their mischief on Akagi, Kaga, and Soryu, and VS-5 scouts sent out on Fletcher’s order had already found Hiryu by the time Spruance took the lead after Fletcher’s (who, in case no one noticed, was in overall command) flagship, Yorktown, was disabled. One can readily see who was in charge of what simply by looking at Spruance’s after-action report, which was submitted through Fletcher as ComTF-17 to CinCPac. Of course,one should not forget that that Fletcher’s other hat was ComCruPac which meant that Spruance, by virtue of HIS other hat as ComCruDiv5, worked for Fletcher. Fletcher never relinquished overall command, he merely signaled that he would conform to Spruance’s movements since Spruance still had operational carriers and Fletcher did no longer. For those who understand how these things work, conforming to movements is not the same thing as relinquishing command. And, of course, there's the minor matter of Fletcher at the time being some 40 -odd numbers ahead of Spruance in seniority . . . can't get rid of that.

                            The decision, and the right one, made by Spruance to temporarily withdraw to the east as darkness came on after recovering the afternoon Hiryu strikes was the most important decision he made on 4 June. Otherwise the handling of TF-16 strikes over the course of June 4th was botched on several levels by the staff he inherited from Halsey, notably by his chief of staff, Browning. The lack of control, coordination, information, and direction of operations between the staff aboard Enterprise and the Hornet was abysmal.
                            Last edited by RLeonard; 15 Jun 20, 21:23.
                            hmmm . . . I wonder what THIS button does . . . uh oh

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Henry Kent Hewitt.

                              Pruitt
                              Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                              Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                              by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X