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Best General of WWII?

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  • Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
    Do you think Eisenhower sending his supplies and fuel to Montgomery might have influenced this as well?

    Pruitt
    This 'supplies and fuel to Montgomery' is a fairytale invented to excuse the poor command performance of the US 12th AG.
    If Montgomery had've got the supplies and fuel he requested and expected, Market Garden would have succeeded.

    If you want to find an almost criminal waste of Allied supply assets in a critical period look no further than the move of General JCH Lee's COMZ from tented luxury in Normandy to palatial extravagance in Paris during the first two weeks of September 1944
    https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA...istics2-2.html

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    • Originally posted by Gooner View Post

      This 'supplies and fuel to Montgomery' is a fairytale invented to excuse the poor command performance of the US 12th AG.
      If Montgomery had've got the supplies and fuel he requested and expected, Market Garden would have succeeded.
      Market Garden failed because of lack of supplies? That's the first time I hear this one, and I don't believe the argument 'holds ground'.

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      • That's a new argument. Is it the airborne forces that were apparantly out-of-supply .or XXX Corps ?
        "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
        Samuel Johnson.

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        • Originally posted by BELGRAVE View Post
          That's a new argument. Is it the airborne forces that were apparantly out-of-supply .or XXX Corps ?
          Not new at all. Neither the airborne forces nor XXX Corps were short of supply. XII Corps and VIII Corps were.

          Remember that Monty had signalled Ike "The large-scale operations by Second Army and the Airborne Corps northwards towards the Meuse and Rhine cannot now take place before 23 Sep. at the earliest and possibly 26 Sep." whereupon Bedell Smith promised 21st Army Group 500 tons a day by road and 500 tons a day by air

          David Belchem, then acting CoS 21st AG

          "The US convoys diverted to supply Second British Army did not begin to reach Brussels until 16 September. When the British offensive began on 17 September, 8 British Corps was still without sufficient transport and stores to enable it to advance: it was not until 19 September that its leading division moved north. On the eastern flanl 12 British Corps was away north on time, but as in the case of 8 Corps, it proved impossible to provide the customary scale of medium and heavy artillery [or tank] support to accompany it.
          The conclusion is that had the Supreme Commander made a very clear decision on 10th September, and had he imposed it upon his subordinates at all levels the result of the Arnhem operation might have been very different. The greater strength of ground forces which could have been made available, would have accelerated the capture of Nijmegen and carried reinforcements through to Arnhem in time."

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          • Originally posted by KapetanBrina View Post
            Market Garden failed because of lack of supplies?
            No, 21st Army Group lacked the supplies and this was one of the chain of events that led to Market Garden not succeeding.

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            • By "new" I meant new to me.
              "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
              Samuel Johnson.

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              • Originally posted by The Purist View Post
                . Patton was the darling of the US press every bit as much as Montgomery was fawned over by the British papers.
                Monty had very good press in The USA. It was partly because of this the US Generals were so ready to castigate him in Jan 1945.

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                • Originally posted by The Purist View Post

                  Regardless, they were no longer capable of stopping 1st US Army (later, 3rd Army) to the west from breaking free and driving into Brittany and around their centre and left. With German 7th Army exhausted and depth of the front penetrated the remaining reserves were no longer capable of successfully intervening. All the German reserves could do was block the British and Commonwealth armour from closing the trap from the north for another week or so.
                  Bradly thought otherwise. That is why he forbade Patton trying to 'cut off' the retreating Germans.
                  Also the Germans were attacking the flank of the 'British' pincer that was trying to close the gap. German Units outside the pocket were attacking west to help the trapped units escape.

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