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Panzer Grenadier's Importance at Kursk.

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  • Panzer Grenadier's Importance at Kursk.

    The unsung heroes of Kursk were the German Panzergrenadiers, who had to go through the Russian's defensive lines and create the Schwehrpunkt for the tanks. Otherwise getting off their vehicles and taking time to bust through the defenses with explosives, flamethrowers and assualt weapons. They also did this at a manic pace and managed to keep up with the tanks.
    Does anyone out there agree that the Panzergrenadiers deserve as much credit as the tank battles?
    The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both are transformed. -Carl Jung

    Hell is other people. -Jean-Paul Sarte

  • #2
    Re: Panzer Grenadier's Importance at Kursk.

    Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom
    The unsung heroes of Kursk were the German Panzergrenadiers, who had to go through the Russian's defensive lines and create the Schwehrpunkt for the tanks. Otherwise getting off their vehicles and taking time to bust through the defenses with explosives, flamethrowers and assualt weapons. They also did this at a manic pace and managed to keep up with the tanks.
    Does anyone out there agree that the Panzergrenadiers deserve as much credit as the tank battles?
    The Germans were the first to use armor in conjunction with motorized infantry and artillery. The Panzergrenadiers were an integral part of that success.
    Lance W.

    Peace through superior firepower.

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    • #3
      Re: Panzer Grenadier's Importance at Kursk.

      Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom
      The unsung heroes of Kursk were the German Panzergrenadiers, who had to go through the Russian's defensive lines and create the Schwehrpunkt for the tanks. Otherwise getting off their vehicles and taking time to bust through the defenses with explosives, flamethrowers and assualt weapons. They also did this at a manic pace and managed to keep up with the tanks.
      Does anyone out there agree that the Panzergrenadiers deserve as much credit as the tank battles?
      It is surely true that armor rarely achieves success with infantry support. Without their "protectors", tanks would be wide open to concentrated anti-tank weapons. The Wehrmacht was the first force to attempt combined arms operations, and were well rewarded for their efforts. Though they would adopt this concept much later, the Soviets did nothing of the sort at Kursk, instead largely depending on their defensive lines.
      Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
      (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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      • #4
        Re: Panzer Grenadier's Importance at Kursk.

        Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom

        Does anyone out there agree that the Panzergrenadiers deserve as much credit as the tank battles?
        Absolutely !

        They were instrumental in the German combat doctrine of WW II; not only at Kursk, but throughout the war.
        Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

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        • #5
          Re: Re: Panzer Grenadier's Importance at Kursk.

          Originally posted by Tigersqn
          Absolutely !

          They were instrumental in the German combat doctrine of WW II; not only at Kursk, but throughout the war.
          They were especially important since most of them were guided by SS General Kurt "Panzermeyer" Meyer.:bowdown:
          VonMoltke

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          • #6
            Just a quick note on combined arms. The Germans were the first to use - but not the first to theorize and create. The Russians were several years ahead in the mid 30's based of Triandafilov and Tukachevsky's ideas of mobile warfare and deep battle (derived from Britain). The problem is that the Purges of 37 and 38 removed the creative edge of the officer corps - and no one understood how to use these formations. For more info consult Mary Habeck's work "Storm of Steel" which compares the evolution of German and Soviet mobile/tank doctrine.

            I agree with the idea that PG's (but so was the ordinary landser) were crucial to the success. I would extend it to any operation which they participated in. The German method of designing Kampfgruppen (battle groups) and getting Infantry, arty, and tanks to work together was a key to their overall capabilities.
            "Give a soldier an anvil, just a hunk of metal, and drive him out into the desert and leave him. In two weeks - when you go to get him, the anvil will be broken."
            General Creighton Abrams on the need for a soldier proof tank.

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            • #7
              Re: Panzer Grenadier's Importance at Kursk.

              Originally posted by BarcelonaBlom
              The unsung heroes of Kursk were the German Panzergrenadiers, who had to go through the Russian's defensive lines and create the Schwehrpunkt for the tanks. Otherwise getting off their vehicles and taking time to bust through the defenses with explosives, flamethrowers and assualt weapons. They also did this at a manic pace and managed to keep up with the tanks.
              Does anyone out there agree that the Panzergrenadiers deserve as much credit as the tank battles?
              Yes. But we need to realize that the German Army even in 1945 was still mainly horse drawn instead of being completely motorized. The US Army was the one that was 99.9% motorized. :bowdown:


              Cheers!




              Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

              "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

              What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

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              • #8
                Good point. I think that Kursk tends to glorify German tankers (particularly in light of recent casualty figures which show the Germans did not lose anywhere near as many tanks as originally suspected) at the expense of the landser and the panzergrenadier. The landser is left as the poor cousin not only on the battlefield but in historical accounts as well.
                "Give a soldier an anvil, just a hunk of metal, and drive him out into the desert and leave him. In two weeks - when you go to get him, the anvil will be broken."
                General Creighton Abrams on the need for a soldier proof tank.

                Comment

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