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Wreck of WWII aircraft carrier USS Wasp discovered in the Coral Sea

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  • Wreck of WWII aircraft carrier USS Wasp discovered in the Coral Sea

    The wreck of World War II aircraft carrier USS Wasp has been discovered in the Coral Sea more than 70 years after the ship was sunk during the Guadalcanal campaign.

    Wasp was spotted on the seabed by experts from the vessel RV Petrel, which is part of a research organization set up by the late billionaire Paul Allen.

    The carrier was escorting Marine reinforcements to Guadalcanal when she was hit by four torpedoes fired by the Japanese submarine I-19 on Sept. 15, 1942. Of the ship’s 2,162-strong crew, 176 were killed in the attack.
    https://www.foxnews.com/tech/wreck-o...-the-coral-sea
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

  • #2
    Wow wow wow!

    This is the best looking wreck ever, it landed right side up and its not all rotten or anything!

    14,000 feet, is that deeper than Titanic? Is that why it looks so good?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Phaing View Post
      Wow wow wow!

      This is the best looking wreck ever, it landed right side up and its not all rotten or anything!

      14,000 feet, is that deeper than Titanic? Is that why it looks so good?
      A lot depends on the local sub surface environment for example how much dissolved oxygen is in the water? Levels can vary considerably depending on location and depth. If it is low then there can be a dead area where there is little or no marine life and corrosion is also much reduced (no rust for example). Underwater surveys in the Black Sea have discovered dead areas in which 3000 year old wrecks dating back to the age of the Greek heros still survive. There are dead areas in all the oceans. If you want to preserve a ship for a really long time forget about dry docks etc - sink it in a dead zone
      Last edited by MarkV; 22 Sep 19, 04:58.
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Phaing View Post
        Wow wow wow!

        This is the best looking wreck ever, it landed right side up and its not all rotten or anything!

        14,000 feet, is that deeper than Titanic? Is that why it looks so good?
        Carriers often land upright. Must be something about the hydrodynamics of that shape falling through water. For one thing, no massive superstructure and heavy gun turrets to make it turn turtle as it goes under.

        Yes, it's a little deeper that TITANIC at around 12,500 or so, but a lot less deep than many.
        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

          Carriers often land upright. Must be something about the hydrodynamics of that shape falling through water. For one thing, no massive superstructure and heavy gun turrets to make it turn turtle as it goes under.

          Yes, it's a little deeper that TITANIC at around 12,500 or so, but a lot less deep than many.
          As I understand it the large area of the flight deck creates a turbulent wake as the carrier falls through the water and this hydraulic drag both slows the descent and stabilises it
          Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
          Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MarkV View Post

            A lot depends on the local sub surface environment for example how much dissolved oxygen is in the water? Levels can vary considerably depending on location and depth. If it is low then there can be a dead area where there is little or no marine life and corrosion is also much reduced (no rust for example). Underwater surveys in the Black Sea have discovered dead areas in which 3000 year old wrecks dating back to the age of the Greek heros still survive. There are dead areas in all the oceans. If you want to preserve a ship for a really long time forget about dry docks etc - sink it in a dead zone
            I saw an interview with Robert Ballard a year or so ago where he described undersea microbes that actually consume steel, and their waste products make it appear that the steel is melting, almost dripping from the rails.



            Here a more detailed description of the little critters.

            Scientists at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada, collected samples of the R.M.S. Titanic's icicle-like rust formations, called rusticles, in 1991.

            Although the formations were teaming with life, nobody had identified the specific microbes on the ship, instead grouping them into broad categories such as bacteria or fungi.

            So Henrietta Mann and then graduate student Bhavleen Kaur, now of the Ontario Science Centre, decided to isolate and identify one species of bacteria from the mess of microscopic life-forms.

            The one they chose turned out to be a new species, which the pair dubbed Halomonas titanicae. The bacteria is part of a family that had never been seen before in waters as deep as those in which the Titanic sits, about 2.4 miles (3.8 kilometers) below the surface, Kaur said. . . . .

            Some experts hope to preserve the wreck by killing the metal-munching bacteria and shielding the boat from currents, allowing tourists and documentary filmmakers to visit Titanic for years to come.

            But "letting it proceed with its deterioration is also a learning process," Kaur said. "If we stop and preserve it, then we stop the process of degradation."

            Ultimately, such deep-dwelling, metal-eating microbes could teach engineers how to protect offshore oil rigs or dispose of other ships.

            "New Bacteria Found on Titanic; Eats Metal," by Rachel Kaufman, National Geographic, 12 Dec 2010
            More dope is available here and here. I'm no microbiologist, but these little suckers appear quite fascinating. The region in which the Wasp sank must not host these microbes.
            I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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            • #7
              Back in the early '70s the next WASP (CVS-18) was berthed on the other side of the pier from us in Quonset Point NAS in RI.
              They sent divers down to check the hull and one of them entered a hole on the starboard side and came out on the port side. Not long after that a fleet tug towed her away for scrapping.
              ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
              IN MARE IN COELO

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              • #8
                Originally posted by slick_miester View Post

                I saw an interview with Robert Ballard a year or so ago where he described undersea microbes that actually consume steel, and their waste products make it appear that the steel is melting, almost dripping from the rails.



                Here a more detailed description of the little critters.



                More dope is available here and here. I'm no microbiologist, but these little suckers appear quite fascinating. The region in which the Wasp sank must not host these microbes.
                Slick, if MarkV is talking about 3,000 year old wrecks and dead zones, he's referring to the absence of wood consuming "toredos" i.e. wood eating sea worms in these zones, thus preserving wooden ships. Right? He's clearly not referring to iron oxidizing or reducing bacteria and deep ocean MIC i.e. "microbially induced corrosion" of iron, steel, manganese etc. Some of the latter prefer living in areas of high salinity and don't require much if any oxygen, like the dead zones he refers to. Science is just coming to grips with these critters.
                "I am Groot"
                - Groot

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                • #9
                  Ballard...the guy who claimed that TITANIC hit bottom at 100 knots or more.

                  Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I remember reading somewhere that they found some old ships on the floor of some of the great lakes. They thought that the thermoclines and lack of oxygen preserved them pretty well.
                    ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
                    IN MARE IN COELO

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jose50 View Post
                      I remember reading somewhere that they found some old ships on the floor of some of the great lakes. They thought that the thermoclines and lack of oxygen preserved them pretty well.
                      The anaerobic water is the key, plus colder temperatures. Most of the very deep ocean wrecks, such as the WASP, are in far greater shape than the TITANIC. I wonder at times whether the high sulphur content alleged in the TITANIC's metal has anything to do with iron-eating extremophobe bacteria.
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Marmat View Post

                        Slick, if MarkV is talking about 3,000 year old wrecks and dead zones, he's referring to the absence of wood consuming "toredos" i.e. wood eating sea worms in these zones, thus preserving wooden ships. Right? He's clearly not referring to iron oxidizing or reducing bacteria and deep ocean MIC i.e. "microbially induced corrosion" of iron, steel, manganese etc. Some of the latter prefer living in areas of high salinity and don't require much if any oxygen, like the dead zones he refers to. Science is just coming to grips with these critters.
                        No I am referring to the lack of free oxygen as I said
                        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jose50 View Post
                          I remember reading somewhere that they found some old ships on the floor of some of the great lakes. They thought that the thermoclines and lack of oxygen preserved them pretty well.
                          https://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.1284755

                          Hamilton's War of 1812 shipwrecks 'an archeologist's dream'


                          CBC News

                          Posted: December 05, 2012
                          Last Updated: December 12, 2012



                          The Hamilton and the Scourge — two wooden ships from the War of 1812 — are aging well at the bottom of Lake Ontario, according to surveyors who have been studying the wrecks.

                          The American schooners, which sank in 1813, lie 90 metres below the surface of the lake, about 10.5 kilometres off Port Dalhousie. The ships have been owned by the City of Hamilton since 1980, but a partnership with Parks Canada allows surveyors to map out every inch of the boats.


                          "One of the things you have to do in order to safely do archeological work is to see it on a map," said Michael McAllister, Hamilton’s coordinator for the survey project. The figurehead on the bow of the schooner Hamilton, which sank in Lake Ontario in 1813. (Courtesy City of Hamilton)
                          Using the latest technology, the entire site was mapped out over the course of several years, allowing experts to better determine how risky it would be to take next steps, like recovering artifacts.

                          "We have no plans, but we need to know the risks to prudently move forward," McAllister said.

                          The team also wanted to get detailed images of the wrecks because they're being colonized by a relative of the zebra mussel. A layer of mussels could eventually cover the ships.

                          The results of the mapping survey were presented last week at the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa by Jonathan Moore, senior underwater archaeologist for Parks Canada. He said the mapping process gave researchers a precise understanding of the positioning, size and details of the ships.

                          "It was very rewarding work. We were using really advanced technology," Moore said.

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                          That technology included sonar imaging, which bounces sound waves off the surface of the ships to map out their size and shape.

                          "Much like an echo-sound or a fish finder," Moore explained, but more sophisticated and with much higher resolution. Remarkable preservation

                          Pushed into service for the U.S. Navy during the War of 1812, the Hamilton and the Scourge were originally merchant ships.
                          'They were in a remarkably good state of preservation. They are basically an archeologist’s dream.' —Jonathan Moore, underwater archaeologist
                          When a sudden squall struck just after midnight on Aug. 8, 1813, the ships went down and have remained at the bottom of Lake Ontario ever since.

                          When first discovered in the 1970s, the ships were upright, intact and had many of the original instruments still in the same positions they would have been in when the ships sank. All of these elements remain in good condition today according to the latest survey results.

                          "They were in a remarkably good state of preservation," Moore said. "They are basically an archeologist’s dream."

                          Lake Ontario, as many people know, is cold, dark and murky. Though many of the surveying techniques overcome this by using technology such as sonar to chart the wrecks, Moore explained, careful planning is still necessary to spot the ships in dark water and to capture good images.

                          "It’s dark because there is no natural light penetrating down that deep, but you can overcome that with artificial light," he said.

                          As for the murkiness — caused by stirred-up bits of sediment — technology can help there, too. The team deployed probes that measure water clarity and found that springtime was the best season to view the ships, according to Moore. Naval history

                          The site of the wrecks is designated as one of two underwater National Historic Sites in Ontario.

                          This means the ships are protected, and diving is prohibited unless an archeological licence is obtained. There is a radar surveillance system in place to monitor the site and to prevent unauthorized divers from trying to sneak a peek.

                          Amateur maritime enthusiasts will have to settle for the detailed mapping and photography collected by the survey, at least until further exploration, and a possible excavation, can take place. So far, there aren’t any firm plans to bring parts of the ships to the surface, according to Moore. It’s in the hands of the City of Hamilton, he explained.

                          But, if the city wants to take further steps in exploration, Moore is more than happy to do the job.

                          "We’re talking with the city all the time," he said. "It’s been a very, very positive and fruitful collaboration." A sonar image taken directly above the wreck shows the body of the Scourge on the floor of Lake Ontario. (Courtesy City of Hamilton)
                          "I am Groot"
                          - Groot

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