Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Classic fighter duels - Spitfire V vs FW190A

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by Kurt Knispel View Post

    That quote appears in Caldwell's book JG-26 Top Guns of the Luftwaffe.
    Thank you. In any case, that is his view and it nicely sums up the issue. I remember reading his description of the very complex envelope of fighters, layered in space and time, that was meant to both protect the dozen bombers and to be able to overcome the German attackers. The amazing thing is that while the Germans sometimes were content with biting at the heels of the British phalanx, picking down a fighter or two from the rear and/or most vulnerable positions, it was not uncommon for the best German pilots to see an opening in the defense, after the initial attacks by some other German fighters, and to dive down onto the bombers. Notwithstanding the disproportionate British advantage in numbers.

    Michele

    Comment


    • #47
      I recall reading in 'Wing Leader' that Johnny Johnson nearly got killed by one of the 'best German pilots'. The Jerry jinked right through the Wing formation who couldn't pot him without hitting their mates, and nobbled Johnson's wingman. Johnson was convinced the Hun had singled him out as the formation leader.
      The author of 'The Big Show' relates, that even as late as 1945 and in his Hawker Tempest, he legged if he came up agin one of the 'best German pilots'.


      The long toll of the brave
      Is not lost in darkness
      Over the fruitful earth
      And athwart the seas
      Hath passed the light of noble deeds
      Unquenchable forever.

      Comment


      • #48
        It is widely known that Adolf Galland, one of the best Luftwaffe pilots and commander of 3./JG 26 during the BOB had some pretty derogatory remarks in his personal memoirs "The First and the Last" about the way the Luftwaffe was utilized by various "higher ups" in the German command. I do not have the book as the versions available now in reprint and kindle edit the book almost in half. I do know Galland had conversations with Hitler numerous times. It has been said that he predicted the demise of the Luftwaffe in 1941 based on how it was being used. I would like to get my hands on an original copy but the cost is astronomical.

        Galland was convinced that the late war Me-262 should be used to intercept the daylight bombers and, in the following video, he talks about this and many other subjects. He was of the opinion that the Me-262, if he was given 100 of them as bomber interceptors, could destroy at least 200 bombers each day while breaking up their formations making them more vulnerable and in tandem with piston engine fighters which would attack the bombers escorts. I think this would have been the death knell for the American bombers and their crews, who were given the task of daylight bombing. Thank god Goring and Hitler were dumb and insisted on using the Me-262 as a bomber. They did relent later to Galland's wishes but it was to late by this time and even then gave him only enough of the Me-262's for a single squadron.


















        Theo mir ist die munition ausgegangen ich werde diesen ramman auf wiedersehen uns in walhalla

        Comment


        • #49
          In March 1941, the Stab and 1./JG 26 were the first Luftwaffe combat units to receive the new BF 109F-1. Every aspect of the original airframe had been examined with an eye for improving aerodynamic efficiency. The cowling was made symmetrical and was faired into a large rounded spinner. The radiators were recessed farther into the wings and incorporated a boundary layer bypass. The horizontal tail was relocated and cantilevered to eliminate its external brace. The wingtips were rounded. The tail wheel was made retractable. All the control surfaces were redesigned, as was the super charger air intake. The new engine intended for the BF 109F, the Daimler Benz 601-E was not ready, and the F-1 and F-2 retained the DB 601-M used in the BF109E-7. Using the same engine, the new model was superior to the old in maximum speed, rate of turn, initial climb, climb rate at altitude, and diving speed. Most important, its overall performance at altitude was improved.

          The most common British fighter in early 1941, the Spitfire 2, was markedly inferior to the BF109F-2. The new Spitfire 5 was at best an even match for the German fighter. The Germans retained their superiority in the climb, the dive, and the zoom climb from a dive, which meant that they could join and break off combat at will. The British Hurricanes and Spitfires could out-turn any German fighter, but all German pilots knew this, and their rule was "one pass and away." The confidant and experienced JG 26 pilots were about to begin their most successful period of the war and the Focke Wulf 190 was already being tested.
          Theo mir ist die munition ausgegangen ich werde diesen ramman auf wiedersehen uns in walhalla

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Kurt Knispel View Post
            ...

            The most common British fighter in early 1941, the Spitfire 2, was markedly inferior to the BF109F-2. The new Spitfire 5 was at best an even match for the German fighter. The Germans retained their superiority in the climb, the dive, and the zoom climb from a dive, which meant that they could join and break off combat at will. The British Hurricanes and Spitfires could out-turn any German fighter, but all German pilots knew this, and their rule was "one pass and away." The confidant and experienced JG 26 pilots were about to begin their most successful period of the war and the Focke Wulf 190 was already being tested.
            Fine, but when you quote at length from an author, please credit him. Put the text in "" and add the author's name (Donald Caldwell in this case). We hate it when people don't do this.
            Michele

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Michele View Post

              We hate it when people don't do this.
              We hate it when people tell us what to hate...
              you speak for yourself mate.



              The long toll of the brave
              Is not lost in darkness
              Over the fruitful earth
              And athwart the seas
              Hath passed the light of noble deeds
              Unquenchable forever.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Von Richter View Post

                We hate it when people tell us what to hate...
                you speak for yourself mate.

                I am speaking for myself.
                By "we" in fact I did not mean "we members of this forum". I meant "we authors", and all the authors that I know, including myself, hate this. Now, of course the authors that I know are a minuscule sample of all the authors in the world, but it's 100% with me on this.

                But just for the conversation's sake, would you find it fair if a poster here posted some text as if it were his, while actually it's a quote from someone else's work?
                Michele

                Comment


                • #53
                  Settle down, folks.
                  We are not here to discuss forum behaviors.
                  Back to the topic, please.

                  ACG Staff
                  "England expects that every man will do his duty!" (English crew members had better get ready for a tough fight against the combined French and Spanish fleets because that's what England expects! However, Scotland, Wales and Ireland appear to expect nothing so the Scottish, Welsh and Irish crew members can relax below decks if they like!)

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Some years ago I posted a thread-starter entitled Why were Western allied ace scores so much higher in WWI than WW2?

                    It's OP run thus:
                    "The highest ‘scores’ of the leading Western allied aces from Britain / Commonwealth (Prattle, Johnson, Malan, Finucane) and the USA Bong, Mcguire, Gabriski) in WW2 were in the low thirties to forty+.

                    This was way lower than the top allied ‘scorers’ in WWI (Fonck, Mannock, Bishop, Guynemer, Nungesser, Collishaw, McCudden etc)


                    But given that there were far more aircraft ‘around’ in overall terms if you will, in WW2 than WWI this seems a little odd.

                    In addition many of the leading aces in WWI operated for relatively short periods 1917-18, 1916-17 for example.

                    The leading German WW2 aces (Hartman, Barkhorn, Nowtony etc) had very high ‘scores’ (well claims at least) up to the mid three hundreds but this was largely due to long stretches fighting the early to mid WW2 Soviet Air Force which had poor pilot training, inferior aircraft and faulty air-combat doctrines until it overcame all these in late 43 – early 44.
                    Non-the-less the Germans also claimed some high scores against the WW2 Western allies as well (Hans Marseille for example).

                    The whole issue is off course bound up in the way I and WW2 ‘played out’."


                    I provided my thoughts on why a bit later.
                    What do newer posters think.
                    Regards lodestar

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      The above post had nothing to do with the thread topic but seems to be an attempt to revive a long dormant thread. Stick to the topic you picked and stop this constant attempt to revive your old threads. Your penchant for self promotion grows tiresome .
                      Prepare to see further posts of this type mysteriously disappear
                      ACG Staff

                      Comment

                      Latest Topics

                      Collapse

                      Working...
                      X