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World War II Camoflauge:.....The Art of Concealment

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  • World War II Camoflauge:.....The Art of Concealment

    Make sure you check out the very bottom picture.

    On the right are definitely P-38's.

    I am unsure what the tail sections of the planes on the left are, but I simply have no idea what the 4 engine job is in the center.

    http://www.eatliver.com/i.php?n=2350&source=rss
    Last edited by Duke William; 18 Sep 07, 23:09.

  • #2
    The closest I can think of for a Lockheed miliatry aircraft (would have to be, since this was a wartime pic) is the C-69, which became the famous Constellation airliner after the war.

    Tricycle gear, four engines, and the tail configuration (looks like it has the central vertical fin, which would be a dead giveaway)

    -Tim

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Duke William View Post
      Make sure you check out the very bottom picture.

      On the right are definitely P-38's.

      I am unsure what the tail sections of the planes on the left are, but I simply have no idea what the 4 engine job is in the center.

      http://www.eatliver.com/i.php?n=2350&source=rss
      Great post Der Dook, they certainly did a thorough job concealing it, just hope they dont have windy days down there!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 88L71 View Post
        The closest I can think of for a Lockheed miliatry aircraft (would have to be, since this was a wartime pic) is the C-69, which became the famous Constellation airliner after the war.

        Tricycle gear, four engines, and the tail configuration (looks like it has the central vertical fin, which would be a dead giveaway)

        -Tim
        Despite the split tail configuration, I have flown on a Constellation Airliner back in my younger days, and I am inclined to disagree with you on the identification of that plane.

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        • #5
          Wow, incredible pictures!

          This seems a little OTT though - as impressive as it is. I mean, what were the chances that the continental USA would come under air attack anyway? And if it was a real danger, couldn't the factory have been moved out of range (sort of like how the Soviets moved all their heavy industry out of range of German bombers)?

          Sorry if this seems like a daft question...

          Dr. S.
          Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

          www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

          www.tabletown.co.uk

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          • #6
            Nice find DW!!


            Originally posted by Doctor Sinister View Post
            This seems a little OTT though - as impressive as it is. I mean, what were the chances that the continental USA would come under air attack anyway? And if it was a real danger, couldn't the factory have been moved out of range (sort of like how the Soviets moved all their heavy industry out of range of German bombers)?

            Sorry if this seems like a daft question...

            Dr. S.
            Propaganda stunt?
            Wolster

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