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Best raids of WW 2

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  • Best raids of WW 2

    Yes I know, what should parameters be. I dunno, ingenuity, effect, ( meaning measureable damage to the enemy), & least loss of life to the participants. A top 5 list perhaps.

    Heavy water in Norway comes to mind

    Guns of Navarone

    Lofoten islands

    One against the Japanese I'll have to look for, ships sunk by men in canoes.

    Italian frogmen at Gibralter, ( I hope that qualifies).

    Similiar attempt against Tirpitz

    Well, that's 6.

    Desert Rats did some damn fine ones as well.

  • #2
    - Rescue of Mussolini
    - Raid on St Nazaire
    - Sinking of the HMS Valiant & Queen Elizabeth in Alexandria harbour by Italian frogmen
    Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

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    • #3
      One against the Japanese I'll have to look for, ships sunk by men in canoes
      Are you thinking of the one in Goa, India?

      HP
      Last edited by Half Pint John; 15 Aug 07, 03:08.
      "Ask not what your country can do for you"

      Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

      youíre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by tigersqn View Post
        - Rescue of Mussolini
        - Raid on St Nazaire
        - Sinking of the HMS Valiant & Queen Elizabeth in Alexandria harbour by Italian frogmen

        All three of these should be high on the list.

        St Nazarie had the most impact IMO.

        HP
        "Ask not what your country can do for you"

        Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

        youíre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Half Pint View Post
          Are you thinking of the one in Gao, India?

          HP
          No, I think he's thinking of Operation Jaywick, an Australian special ops (Z Unit) canoe attack on the Singapore harbor on 26 Sep '44.

          BTW, did Guns of Navarone actually happen? I think it's a work of fiction.

          I will add the raid on Bruneval.
          Last edited by Ogukuo72; 15 Aug 07, 03:13.

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          • #6
            The raid on Goa in India was very sucussful with little blood shed.

            Seems to have been lost to history even though there was a movie made with many well known stars.

            HP
            "Ask not what your country can do for you"

            Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

            youíre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Ogukuo72 View Post
              No, I think he's thinking of Operation Jaywick, an Australian special ops (Z Unit) canoe attack on the Singapore harbor on 26 Sep '44.

              BTW, did Guns of Navarone actually happen? I think it's a work of fiction.

              I will add the raid on Bruneval.
              The Z Unit attack is lost in the fuzzies of memory(mine). IIRC they used fold boots for the attack, canvas and wood.

              I was of the same opinion on Navarone.

              HP
              "Ask not what your country can do for you"

              Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

              youíre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

              Comment


              • #8
                The movie took quite a bit of dramatic license, complete with a James Bond-like British intelligence officer and an exotic femme fatale.

                But the raid did happen, and the raiders really were retired British soldiers and businessmen, and they really did infiltrate Goa harbor in a rickety coastal freighter. There really were three German merchant vessels interned in Goa (along with an Italian one), and one had a powerful transmitter on board that was sending U-boats signals about Allied merchant traffic. The Axis vessels, believing that they were about to be seized, scuttled their boats.

                This was a case of the facts being stranger than fiction.

                To read about the little known raid, there's an excellent book:
                "Boarding Party: The Last Action of the Calcutta Light Horse (Bluejacket Books)"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Half Pint View Post
                  The Z Unit attack is lost in the fuzzies of memory(mine). IIRC they used fold boots for the attack, canvas and wood.

                  I was of the same opinion on Navarone.

                  HP
                  That's the one! They travelled to the Riau on a coastal craft, then launched from the island when tide conditions were favorable. Those Australians were remarkably brave chaps and did a fair bit of damage on Japanese shipping.

                  On a side note, the Japs launched reprisals on the population of Singapore and on the POWs. And when the Z Unit tried a second operation that failed, the captured Australian soldiers were summarily executed.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ogukuo72 View Post
                    The movie took quite a bit of dramatic license, complete with a James Bond-like British intelligence officer and an exotic femme fatale.

                    But the raid did happen, and the raiders really were retired British soldiers and businessmen, and they really did infiltrate Goa harbor in a rickety coastal freighter. There really were three German merchant vessels interned in Goa (along with an Italian one), and one had a powerful transmitter on board that was sending U-boats signals about Allied merchant traffic. The Axis vessels, believing that they were about to be seized, scuttled their boats.

                    This was a case of the facts being stranger than fiction.

                    To read about the little known raid, there's an excellent book:
                    "Boarding Party: The Last Action of the Calcutta Light Horse (Bluejacket Books)"
                    Wiki has an article and ref to the same book.

                    HP
                    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

                    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

                    youíre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Otto Skorzeny


                      Originally posted by tigersqn View Post
                      - Rescue of Mussolini
                      Yeah, the Rescue of Mussolini is a classic Special Operation Raid. Otto Skorzeny is one my personal favorites.

                      September 4, 1943; 8 of the 12 fully-manned DFS 230 Gliders that set out landed in Gran Grasso..., the following is from "Kommando" by J. Lucas

                      "One after the other the machines touched down and raced along the boulder-strewn ground, their braking 'chutes streaming behind them. Skorzeny's machine halted only fifteen or twenty yards from the hotel's main door, He raced up the slope and into the foyer, kicked and Italian radio-operator (and his set) out of action, found and liberated the Italian leader. From touch down to liberation had taken less than 4 minutes. The next step was to bring the Facsist leader to Hitler's HQ. It has never been established why Skorzeny did not use the funicular down into the valley whence he could have organized a fast convoy to the aerodome. Instead, his flamboyant gesture was a masterpeice of propaganda: he flew Mussolini from the Gran Grasso in a light Fiesler Storch."

                      This was Skorzeny's first Commando Operation....
                      Last edited by Paul Mann III; 15 Aug 07, 04:06.
                      "This life..., you know, "the life." Youíre not gonna get any medals, kid. This is not a hero business; you donít shoot people from a mile a way. You gotta stand right next to them... blow their heads off."

                      BoRG

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by P.V. Mann III View Post
                        Yeah, the Rescue of Mussolini is a classic Special Operation Raid. Otto Skorzeny is one my personal favorites.

                        September 4, 1943; 8 of the 12 fully-manned DFS 230 Gliders that set out landed in Gran Grasso..., the following is from "Kommando" by J. Lucas

                        Oe after the other the machines touched down and raced along the boulder-strewn ground, their braking 'chutes streaming behind them. Skorzeny's machine halted only fifteen or twenty yards from the hotel's main door, He raced up the slope and into the foyer, kicked and Italian radio-operator (and his set) out of action, found and liberated the Italian leader. From touch down to liberation had taken less than 4 minutes. The next step was to bring the Facsist leader to Hitler's HQ. It has never been established why Skorzeny did not use the funicular down into the valley whence he could have organized a fast convoy to the aerodome. Instead, his flamboyant gesture was a masterpeice of propaganda: he flew Mussolini from the Gran Grasso in a light Fiesler Storch.

                        This was Skorzeny's first Commando Operation....
                        In addition, Skorzeny squeezed himself into the Storch together with Mussolini, the result of which the plane was so overweight that it dropped in attitude as it flew off the plateau and only regained attitude with some difficulty.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          For Operation Jaywick against the Japanese see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Jaywick


                          On September 2 the Krait left Exmouth Gulf and departed for Singapore. The team's safety depended on maintaining the disguise of a local fishing boat. The men stained their skin brown with dye to appear more Asiatic and were meticulous in what sort of rubbish they threw overboard, lest a trail of European garbage lead arouse suspicion. After a relatively uneventful voyage the Krait arrived off Singapore on September 24. That night six men left the boat and paddled 50 kilometres to establish a forward base in a cave on a small island near the harbour. On the night of September 26 they paddled into the harbour and placed limpet mines on several Japanese ships before returning to their hiding spot.


                          In the resulting explosions, the limpet mines sank or seriously damaged four Japanese ships, comprising over 39,000 tons between them. The commandos waited until the commotion over the attack had subsided and then returned to the Krait, which they reached on October 2. The return to Australia was mostly uneventful, except for a tense incident in the Lombok Strait when the ship was closely approached by a Japanese patrol boat; however the Krait was not challenged. On October 19, the ship and crew arrived safely back at Exmouth Gulf.

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                          • #14
                            I think he's thinking of Operation Jaywick,

                            Yah, that's it. Read a book on it long ago. Quite a story. Followup not so successful as I recall.

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                            • #15
                              the guns of navarone is total fiction ... there is no island called it ...

                              as to great raid bruneval 1942 ...
                              attack on rommels HQ
                              tobruk 1942 ..
                              owner of the yahoo group for WW1 ,WW2 and Modern TO&Es
                              (Tables of organisation & equipment or Unit of action )

                              http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOandEs/

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