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Odd Question About World War II

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  • Odd Question About World War II

    Hello all. If any of you have a subscription or simply buy the magazine "World War II History" ( a bi-monthly magazine that is simply amazing in covering the history of WWII), and you have bought or received the January 2004 issue, might I direct you to page 38. On this page is a rather peculiar photo that contains something I've never really seen before: An American GI carrying an StG44. I find this strange mainly because the GI is not carrying any other weapons, is marching most likely to a battle, and because I've never heard of American (or any Allied soldier) picking up an StG44 and using it in place of their normal weapon. I imagine that it would be difficult to keep your supplies of ammo sufficient with a rather rare gun with rare ammo. The soldier is also NOT in a surrounded army, so he is not using it out of necessity. Does anyone know of how frequently the Allies used their opponent's weapons, or have any other input on this subject?
    Negative.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Polka Sheep
    Hello all. If any of you have a subscription or simply buy the magazine "World War II History" ( a bi-monthly magazine that is simply amazing in covering the history of WWII), and you have bought or received the January 2004 issue, might I direct you to page 38. On this page is a rather peculiar photo that contains something I've never really seen before: An American GI carrying an StG44. I find this strange mainly because the GI is not carrying any other weapons, is marching most likely to a battle, and because I've never heard of American (or any Allied soldier) picking up an StG44 and using it in place of their normal weapon. I imagine that it would be difficult to keep your supplies of ammo sufficient with a rather rare gun with rare ammo. The soldier is also NOT in a surrounded army, so he is not using it out of necessity. Does anyone know of how frequently the Allies used their opponent's weapons, or have any other input on this subject?
    I know that the 82nd Abn Div picked up and used Panzerfausts/panzershreiks as a matter of course.
    Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

    Comment


    • #3
      soldiers using enemy small arms they've picked up on the battlefield isn't anything unusual. On the eastern front, many German troops made extensive use of captured Russian submachineguns (its name eludes me at the moment) and the Russian put captured panzerfaust to use against their former owners. As far as ammo goes, I would think that it was probably just a matter of scavenging fallen or captured enemy troops and even wrecked and abandoned vehicles for ammo. Additionally, unless I'm mistaken, I think allied troops also used 7.92 rounds similar to those used by the STG44.
      -----------------------------------
      Sings we a song of wolves.
      Who smells fear and slays the coward.
      Sings we a song of man.
      Who smells gold and slays his brother
      .

      Comment


      • #4
        German had T-34 units, Americans collected German pistols (as I saw in Saving Private Ryan), if I am right Rumanian after changing side used German tanks, German used captured French and Check tanks, and if needed everyone used whatever he found...
        a brain cell

        Comment


        • #5
          Hello,

          The Luftwaffe even flew captured allied aircraft, among which P-47s as narrated in "Ordeal in the Vosges" (Pence, Petersen) where soldiers of 275th Infantry (70th ID) recall being straffed by P-47 wearing the black cross. The interesting thing is that these P-47s were apparently flown not only for test purposes but also as operational aircraft (even at the risk of a happy-trigger Flak).

          http://www.luftwaffe-experten.co.uk/republic.html
          http://members.aol.com/dheitm8612/capture.htm

          Nemo

          Comment


          • #6
            Polka Sheep wrote:
            The soldier is also NOT in a surrounded army, so he is not using it out of necessity. Does anyone know of how frequently the Allies used their opponent's weapons, or have any other input on this subject?

            Don't think I covered this point in my last post.

            Often times troops will take weapons that they consider superior or much better than the weapons they were originally equipped with. The German troops I mentioned earlier took Russian submachineguns due to their reputation of almost never jamming.

            The same reason is probably why the GI in your photo took the STG44, as it was a much better weapon (being after all the grand daddy of the M16 and AK 47) combining the automatic fire capabilities of a submachine gun with the accuracy and stopping power of a rifle while still being considerably lighter than an MG.
            Last edited by Wolfleader; 18 Nov 03, 05:46.
            -----------------------------------
            Sings we a song of wolves.
            Who smells fear and slays the coward.
            Sings we a song of man.
            Who smells gold and slays his brother
            .

            Comment


            • #7
              In a French magazine about the Battle of the Ardenne there is a picture showing a captured Konigtiger driven by GI's (from the Kg Peiper).

              LaPalice.
              Monsieur de La Palice est mort
              Mort devant Pavie.
              Un quart d'heure avant sa mort
              Il était encore en vie...

              Comment


              • #8
                I've seen quite a bit of photos of GI's rummaging through knocked out heavy panzers but never of one where they were driving it around.

                I wonder if that means that somewhere in the world there is a fully functional King Tiger tank.
                -----------------------------------
                Sings we a song of wolves.
                Who smells fear and slays the coward.
                Sings we a song of man.
                Who smells gold and slays his brother
                .

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Wolfleader
                  I've seen quite a bit of photos of GI's rummaging through knocked out heavy panzers but never of one where they were driving it around.

                  I wonder if that means that somewhere in the world there is a fully functional King Tiger tank.
                  That would be a hell of a souvenir to bring back from the war wouldn't it ?

                  Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hooray Daddy's home

                    Did you bring me something nice daddy!! Like a helmet or or a Luger or or....

                    No son....

                    ....I brought you something better.

                    *Faint metalic rumbling noise can be heard outside.*

                    -----------------------------------
                    Sings we a song of wolves.
                    Who smells fear and slays the coward.
                    Sings we a song of man.
                    Who smells gold and slays his brother
                    .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tigersqn
                      That would be a hell of a souvenir to bring back from the war wouldn't it ?

                      On the weekend on a program on military history I spoke to some people who are battlefield researcher, and they said there were 2 knocked out Tiger in Hungary after WWII. These were left in a training field. After 1990 Americans got the field to practice and after that the Tigers disappeared.

                      So if you see someone driving Tiger in the USA it is possible it is from Hungary.
                      a brain cell

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by laszlo.nemedi
                        On the weekend on a program on military history I spoke to some people who are battlefield researcher, and they said there were 2 knocked out Tiger in Hungary after WWII. These were left in a training field. After 1990 Americans got the field to practice and after that the Tigers disappeared.

                        So if you see someone driving Tiger in the USA it is possible it is from Hungary.
                        Who do we call to return them?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Priest
                          Who do we call to return them?
                          Ministry of defense?
                          a brain cell

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Wolfleader
                            I wonder if that means that somewhere in the world there is a fully functional King Tiger tank.
                            Hello,

                            The Saumur tank museum has completely restored a Königtiger (including the engine). It is doubtful however that would make the tank "fully functional" - no details as to the extent of the restoration is given, so there is no way to tell if, for instance, this King Tiger is able to simply move on its tracks.

                            Here is the link anyway :
                            http://www.musee-des-blindes.asso.fr...s/p2guerre.htm
                            (french version only)

                            Nemo

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for all the replies. I guess he just found it a supeior weapon, as was said before.

                              I'm well aware that the Germans on the Eastern Front sometimes ditched their MP40's for the Russian PPSh-41 SMG, one of the best submachine guns of all time, and the gun that became the trademark of the Russian soldier during the war.
                              Negative.

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